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Why has early childhood science education taken so long to become established as a field of research inquiry? Why do we continue to blame early childhood and primary teachers for their lack of confidence and competence in science education? This book tackles these questions and more.

Grounded in cultural-historical theory, this book explores the development of the field through the eyes of the author. Over 30 years the contexts, the questions, and the foci of a generation of science education researchers are mapped. As the field develops, new concepts, models of teaching and new methods and methodologies are theorised and empirically supported, bringing forward uniqueness of science education for children in play-based settings.
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In this book, 23 contributors offer new insights on key issues in mathematics education in early childhood. The chapters cover all mathematics curriculum-related issues in early childhood (number, geometry, patterns and structures and mathematics in daily life). Special attention is given to teachers knowledge and innovative research issues such as quantifiers among young children.

Contributors are: Abraham Arcavi, Ruthi Barkai, Douglas H. Clements, Bat-Sheva Eylon, Dina Hassidov, Rina Hershkowitz, Leah Ilani, Bat-Sheva Ilany, Candace Joswick, Esther Levenson, Zvia Markovits, Zemira Mevarech, Joanne Mulligan, Sherman Rosenfeld, Flavia Santamaria, Julie Sarama, Juhaina Awawdeh Shahbari, Amal Sharif-Rasslan, Tal Sharir, Nora Scheuer, Pessia Tsamir, Dina Tirosh and Ana Clara Ventura.
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This is a collection of essays on China's new curriculum reforms in basic education, covering various aspects of the reforms ranging from education theory to classroom actitivity transofrmation, from teacher training to teaching quality evaluation. Prof. Zhong presents rich experiences in the reforms in the last decade as collisions between old ideas and new ones, marking the end of the Kairov Era pedagogy. This book discusses profound changes in China's basic education, propelled by both top-down designs and bottom-up innovations from grass-root teachers.
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During the Fifteen Year War, Japan's 'little citizens' were educated via a curriculum centering patriotic and militarist ideologies. Patriotic Pedagogy: How Karuta Game Cards Taught a Japanese War Generation, explores karuta, a poetry card game developed in this period as progressive early childhood pedagogy. As karuta became popular as an educational toy, educators and publishers soon noted karuta's engaging physical play and short slogans and poems made them ideal for conveying patriotic ideals to children.

Including reproductions of the images and translations of the poems, Kelly offers an analysis of the race, class and gender ideologies the cards conveyed, suggesting that these semingly innocuous children's toys were effective tools of a propagandist pedagogy.
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High-stakes standardized testing has a long history of exclusion, oppression, power, and control with deep roots in the landscape of American education. In this text, the events and circumstances that have forged the way of high-stakes testing are presented in a straightforward and accessible manner.

This history is essential to understanding our current realities of testing in the United States especially as they relate to marginalization and control of certain populations. Furthermore, a historical perspective provides a lens to consider high-stakes standardized testing critically; to unpack the purposes, benefits, and damages of this practice.
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Through this book, the author shares the nomadology of Alys-we searching for the Ideal School. Fed up with the System, traditional mainstream education directed by neoliberalism and high-stakes testing, Alys travelled to over 180 places of learning/schools in 23 countries that were educating differently. Through performative autoethnographic-we the author shares these embodied experiences in poems, vignettes, journaling and ethnodrama. Alys realised that the Ideal School is an oxymoron and she argues that schools and schooling, even within innovative education, are not the future for learning.

By developing the edge-ucation and sharing stories from the ‘gems’ that currently exist in places of learning/schools, there is the potentiality and hope for a paradigm shift. The book encourages everyone to become School Tourists themselves. Performing School Tourism is a mediation between creativity, arts, learning and teaching, leading to change as it helps shape the identity of those performing School Tourism and allows them to add these new experiences and understandings of the possibilities for education to the Earth-we, the collective consciousness of the world. Read this book to follow Alys’ journey as they share stories and trouble different innovative pedagogies (including Steiner Waldorf, Progressive, Democratic, and Montessori). The reader can choose their own adventure, following the rhizomatic multiple voices of Alys-we.
Education, Knowledge and Liberation for All Citizens
This book supports the formal education of all Indigenous children who live in different circumstances in different countries. It takes Indigenous philosophy as its starting point, while recognising that in many colonial and post-colonial circumstances, Indigenous knowledge, culture and language may not be valued. For this reason, Indigenous and non-Indigenous theorists and authors are included to demonstrate the recognised links between Indigenous and non-Indigenous understandings and practices of culture, knowledge and learning and therefore common approaches to formal education. Chapters are arranged in an integrated fashion to discuss contextual issues regarding global political and economic influences and the notion of what it means to participate fully in society.
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At Christmas 1936, Presbyterian children in New Zealand raised over £400 for an x-ray machine in a south Chinese missionary hospital. From the early 1800s, thousands of children in the British world had engaged in similar activities, raising significant amounts of money to support missionary projects world-wide. But was money the most important thing? Hugh Morrison argues that children’s education was a more important motive and outcome. This is the first book-length attempt to bring together evidence from across a range of British contexts. In particular it focuses on children’s literature, the impact of imperialism and nationalism, and the role of emotions.
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“I just cannot write” or “I am not a good writer” are familiar complaints from students in academia. Many of them claim they cannot express themselves clearly in written text, and their lack of this skill impedes them in their academic career. In this book, Nancy A. Wasser argues that teachers can help solve this when they start viewing writing not as secondary to reading, but as the equally important side of the same coin. Those who cannot read, will not be able to write.

Wasser explains how teaching and regular practicing of writing skills from an early age onwards helps children grow into students who are self-aware of their voices. By employing narrative as a process of learning to write and a way to read, teachers can teach children the art of writing, while also making children more aware of their own constructions of narrative. Combining the focus on individual and group expression in writing lessons, students can trace and reflect on their own life transformations through their writing process.

Good writers are not born that way, but made through effort and practice. Changes in curriculum may not only lead to better-expressed citizens, but also to more balance between teacher and children voices.
L’écolâtre cathédral en France septentrionale du ixe au xiiie siècle
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This book traces the history of one of the central actors in the transformation of the Western educational system between the 9th and 13th centuries: the cathedral schoolmaster. Originally responsible for running the episcopal school, this ecclesiastical official eventually became a true school administrator with a territorial monopoly and coercive powers, including in particular issuing ‘licentia docendi’ to masters under his jurisdiction. Using a wide range of sources and taking in thirty-nine dioceses in northern France, the study analyses the construction of the office from the Carolingian period, the place of the schoolmaster within the canonical community and in feudal society, and the institutionalisation of his function with the Gregorian Reform and the birth of universities.