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Developing teacher education policies calls for a collaborative dialogue of teacher educators, student teachers, researchers, teachers, school heads and school boards, as well as policy makers at regional, national and European levels. The Teacher Education Policy in Europe Scientific Network (TEPE Network) focuses on improving the quality of teacher education in Europe. This aim is reached through careful comparison and analysis of teacher education practices in Europe, sharing of existing practices and outcomes of research on teacher education, and by discussing the implications of these outcomes for teacher education policies at faculty, institutional, regional, national and European level. Key Issues in Teacher Education: Policy, Research and Practice is a series of scholarly texts that inspires and facilitates this dialogue regarding teacher education as an ongoing process of professional development within the continuum of the teaching profession, from initial teacher education, through induction and on to continuing professional development throughout teacher careers. Such teacher education aims to support prospective, novice and experienced teachers to develop their professional capability in fostering the individual and collective learning needs of pupils and in creating and strengthening learning environments and school environments that are inclusive and democratic, that aim at equity and that are exemplary for an inclusive and democratic society. The coherence of the TEPE series is created by a common focus of each volume that is characterized by: • A comparative European (international) perspective cherishing diversity in perspectives and viewpoints; • Addressing the continuum of teacher education; • Bridging research, practice and policy; • With a focus on the implications for local, national or international policies, practices and research. Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the Series Editors, Maria Assunção Flores, Joanna Madalińska-Michalak, and Marco Snoek.
Comparative and International Education: A Diversity of Voices aims to provide a comprehensive range of titles, making available to readers work from across the comparative and international education research community. Authors will represent as broad a range of voices as possible, from geographic, cultural and ideological standpoints. The editors are making a conscious effort to disseminate the work of newer scholars as well as that of well-established writers.
The series includes authored books and edited works focusing upon current issues and controversies in a field that is undergoing changes as profound as the geopolitical and economic forces that are reshaping our worlds.
The series aims to provide books which present new work, in which the range of methodologies associated with comparative education and international education are both exemplified and opened up for debate. As the series develops, it is intended that new writers from settings and locations not frequently part of the English language discourse will find a place in the list.
The WCCES is an international organization of comparative education societies worldwide and is an NGO in consultative partnership with UNESCO. The WCCES was created in 1970 to advance the field of comparative education. Members usually meet every three years for a World Congress in which scholars, researchers, and administrators interact with colleagues and counterparts from around the globe on international issues of education.
The WCCES also promotes research in various countries. Foci include theory and methods in comparative education, gender discourses in education, teacher education, education for peace and justice, education in post-conflict countries, language of instruction issues, Education for All. Such topics are usually represented in thematic groups organized for the World Congresses. Besides organizing the World Congresses, the WCCES has a section in CERCular, the newsletter of the Comparative Education Research Centre at the University of Hong Kong, to keep individual societies and their members abreast of activities around the world.
The WCCES comprehensive website is http://www.wcces.com
As a result of these efforts under the auspices of the global organization, WCCES and its member societies have become better organized and identified in terms of research and other scholarly activities. They are also more effective in viewing problems and applying skills from different perspectives, and in disseminating information. A major objective is advancement of education for international understanding in the interests of peace, intercultural cooperation, observance of human rights and mutual respect among peoples.
The WCCES Series was established to provide for the broader dissemination of discourses between scholars in its member societies. Representing as it does Societies and their members from all continents, the organization provides a special forum for the discussion of issues of interest and concern among comparativists and those working in international education. The first series of volumes was produced from the proceedings of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies XIII World Congress, which met in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, 3–7 September, 2007 with the theme of Living Together: Education and Intercultural Dialogue.

The first series included the following titles:
Volume 1: Tatto, M. & Mincu, M. (Eds.), Reforming Teaching and Learning
Volume 2: Geo JaJa, M. A. & Majhanovich, S. (Eds.), Education, Language and Economics: Growing National and Global Dilemmas
Volume 3: Pampanini, G., Adly, F. & Napier, D. (Eds.), Interculturalism, Society and Education
Volume 4: Masemann, V., Majhanovich, S., Truong, N., & Janigan, K. (Eds.), A Tribute to David N. Wilson: Clamoring for a Better World

The second series of volumes has been developed from the proceedings of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies XIV World Congress, which met in Istanbul, Turkey, 14–18 June, 2010 with the theme of Bordering, Re-Bordering and new Possibilities in Education and Society. This series includes the following titles, with further volumes under preparation:
Volume 1: Napier, D.B. & Majhanovich, S. (Eds.) Education, Dominance and Identity
Volume 2: Biseth, H. & Holmarsdottir, H. (Eds.) Human Rights in the Field of Comparative Education
Volume 3: Ginsburg, M. (Ed.) Preparation, Practice & and Politics of Teachers
Volume 4: Majhanovich, S. & Geo-JaJa, M.A. (Eds.) Economics, Aid and Education
Volume 5: Napier, D. B. (Ed.), Qualities of Education in a Globalised World

The third series of volumes has been developed from the proceedings of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies XV World Congress which met in Buenos Aires, Argentina, June 24-28, 2013 with the theme of New Times, New Voices. This series will include a number of volumes under preparation including:
Volume 1: Gross, Z. & Davies L. (Eds.) The Contested Role of Education in Conflict and Fragility
Volume 2: DePalma, R., Brook Napier, D. & Dze Ngwa, W. (Eds.) Revitalizing Minority Voices: Language Issues in the New Millennium
Volume 3: Majhanovich, S. & Malet, R. (Eds.) Building Democracy through Education on Diversity
Volume 4: Olson, J., Biseth, H. & Ruiz, G. (Eds.) Educational Internationalisation: Academic Voices and Public Policy
Volume 5: Acosta, F. & Nogueira, S. (Eds.) Rethinking Public Education Systems in the 21st Century Scenario: New and Renovated Challenges between Policies and Practices
Volume Editors: , , and
The world ecological system is marked by difference throughout. There is social difference with different identities, shifting and transmuting, being forged, and extra-human differences. All these have implications for intra human and human/non-human earth relations. This aspect is not always recognised and valorised. Education, though not an independent variable, still can be mobilised, together with other sources of potential transformation, to redress this situation marked by aggressions, micro and macro, inertia and indifference. It represents a number of immediate challenges for Adult Education. This compendium is intended as a useful resource in this regard. It maps out a kaleidoscope of myriad differences and suggests options for overcoming the various obstacles that stand opposed to those who seek fulfilment in the way they are discursively located. The obstacles are a dent on efforts to living in communion with the rest of the cosmos. The utopian view is that of different species living in harmony with each other. This book emphasises social/ecological justice, intersectionality and relationality as the targets for Adult Education in this relatively still new millennium.

Contributors are: Sharifah Salmah Binti Abdullah, Thi Bogossian, Lauren Bouttell, Lidiane Nunes de Castro, Anyela Nathalie Gomez Deantonio, Preeti Dagar, Raquel Galeano Giminez, Ksenija Joksimović, Kainat Khurshid, Robert Livingston, Peter Mayo, Sonia Medel, Yunah Park, Zainab Sa’id Sa’ad, Bonnie Slade, Gameli Kodzo Tordzro, Agnieszka Uflewska and Aisara Yessenova.
Volume Editors: and
India has one of the largest populations in the world with around 1.4 billion people. It also has a rich culture dating back over 10,000 years. Recently, scholars around the globe are showing increased interest in India and Indian students are actively involved in premier institutions in every region.

Adult Education in India is a ready reckoner for students, scholars, practitioners, and all others interested in the history of the development of adult education since India's ancient period to the present day. This volume addresses the activities of different adult educators like Raja Rammohan Roy, Iswarchandra Vidyasagar, Rabindranath Tagore, Dr. Bhim Rao Ambedkar and many more, contextualizing how they acted and influenced the cause of global adult education.

In more recent decades, as India’s economy has grown, and as the forces of industrialization, urbanization and globalization have become stronger in reshaping institutions; new ways of thinking about adult education have emerged. The idea of lifelong learning is now aligned to the requirements of the global knowledge economy. The focus on bare literacy is no longer considered sufficient, but only the first step towards preparing citizens to participate in the global market, to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes that enable them to become enterprising and entrepreneurs. The logic of the market has become dominant.
Rebalancing Power in the Co-Construction of Knowledge
Volume Editors: , , and
Establishing truly respectful, mutually beneficial, and equitable knowledge creation partnerships with diverse communities poses significant challenges for academia. Bridging Knowledge Cultures provides valuable insights into the dynamics involved and the obstacles encountered when attempting to establish meaningful research partnerships between different knowledge domains. This book goes beyond exploration by offering practical recommendations to overcome these challenges and forge effective collaboration between mainstream research institutions and community groups and organizations.
This book includes ten compelling case studies conducted by research and training hubs established through the global Knowledge for Change Consortium. These case studies encompass community-university research partnerships across various geographical locations, tackling a wide range of societal issues and acknowledging the wealth of knowledge created by local communities.
The overarching goal of this book is to inspire the next generation of researchers and professionals to embrace the richness of diverse perspectives and knowledge cultures. By advocating for the construction of "bridges" through practical approaches, the book encourages a shift from competition to collaboration in research. Ultimately, it aims to foster an environment where different forms of knowledge can intersect and thrive, leading to a more inclusive and comprehensive understanding of the world around us.
Volume Editors: and
This volume contributes to the advancement of comparative education in the world, more specifically in expanding understandings of the discourse of comparative education vis-à-vis educational transformation. Throughout the text, three critical elements that reflect comparative education as an open, inconclusive discourse come up: (1) There is sufficient pedagogical space for dissonance. It is always possible to compare one’s own authenticity with the epistemological position others hold dear and argue for. (2) The contributions in this book should not be read as absolute pieces of writing as that would undermine the flexible nature of education. It is important to point out that the opinions of the authors are temporary moments of attachment to persuasive claims. However, these claims are not cast in stone as new views continue to emerge from epistemological (re)positioning. (3) Our own reading of the book corroborates our interest in comparative education as a continuous discourse in the making. The contributions of scholars at the third symposium organized by WCCES provided a platform for them to pursue their knowledge interests. In addition, these interests have and will or ought never to be homogenous for that would be incommensurate with a defensible practice of comparative education.
Volume Editors: and
In the last decade, programming and computational thinking (CT) have been introduced on a large scale in school curricula and standards all over the world. In countries such as the UK, a new school subject—computing—was created, whereas in countries such as Sweden, programming was included in existing subjects, notably mathematics and technology education. The introduction of programming and CT in technology education implies a particular relationship between programming and technology. Programming is usually performed with technological artefacts—various types of computers—and it can also be seen as a specific branch of engineering.

This book analyses the background to and current implementation of programming and computational thinking in a Swedish school technology context, in relation to international developments. The various chapters deal with pertinent issues in technology education and its relation to computers and computing, for example, computational thinking and literacy, teachers’ programming competence, and computational thinking, programming, and learning in technology education. The book includes examples from educational research that could also be used as inspiration for school teaching, teacher education and curriculum development.
Over the past few decades, it has become increasingly frequent to come across the co-existence of multiple large-scale assessment surveys within national, subnational, or local settings. Despite the overlapping of tests, time, efforts, and economic resources invested in these “assessment assemblages”, much remains to be learned about their origins, development, tensions, frictions, outcomes, and challenges. Harmony and Cacophony in Large-scale Assessments in Education delves into these issues via a critical lens and offers a case in point against which readers can place their own situations. In other words, it serves as an empirically grounded thinking toolbox to help readers problematize emerging, ongoing, or upcoming challenges related to their large-scale assessment settings.
Reaching out into the rural English teaching and learning environment led to compiling these chapters that exemplify the possibilities and achievements of teachers worldwide. Often with overly large classes, isolation, and few resources, English instruction leads to extrinsic success for their students with future educational, professional, and economic outcomes. In other instances, the fruits of teachers’ labor become intrinsic motivators for learners who value learning and critical thinking. English in the international curriculum has perceived value for developing human and social capital, as indicated in these authors’ personal and professional journeys.

This volume was originally begun by Paul Chamness Iida, who sadly passed away in June 2021. The editors have done their best to complete this project as he envisioned and share this work in his honor.

Contributors are: Mary Frances Agnello, Md. Al Amin, Naoko Araki, Monica A. Baker, Xingtan Cao, Mary Coady, Florent Domenach, Lee E. Friederich, Arely Romero García, Maribel Villegas Greene, Janinka Greenwood, Dongni Guo, Paul Chamness Iida (deceased), Irham Irham, Munchuree Kaosayapandhu, Wuri P. Kusumastuti, Di Liang, Carla Meskill, Erin Mikulec, Piotr Romanowski, Leticia Araceli Salas Serrano, Fang Wang, Emilia Wąsikiewicz-Firlej, Jing Yixuan, Jing Zhiyuan and Dai Chang Zhi.