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From this set of critical stories emerges a timely confession from marginalized imagined communities at the physical and metaphorical Mexican-American border. These hybrid storytellers create a multivalence of experiences and genres. Composers of this ground-breaking collection draw readers into an affective connection with the borderlands, offering critical examinations of legal status, gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, social class, family, and health. Additionally, creative representations across genres explore notions of geography, vulnerability, suffering, trauma, pain as well as joy, healing, and love. By posing questions about loss of innocence, they incite new literary and visual spaces for fusing together fragments of the remains of land, body, and/or being, all the while creating a site of fresh confessions where critical stories are illuminated collages assembled together from within la línea.

Contributors are: Kiri Avelar, Irving Ayala, Carmella J. Braniger, Roxana Fragoso Carrillo, Marisa V. Cervantes, Guadalupe Chavez, Julio Enríquez-Ornelas, Liliana Conlisk Gallegos, Verónica Gaona, Andrea Gómez, Filiberto Mares Hernández, Víctor M. Macías-González, Carol Mariano, Ana Silvia Monzón Monterroso, Juana Moriel-Payne, Rachel Neff, Jumko Ogata-Aguilar, José Olivarez, Isabela Ortega, Paul Pedroza, Jorge Omar Ramírez Pimienta, Raphaella Prange, Felipe Quetzalcoatl Quintanilla, Erica Reyes, Fidel García Reyes, Lizbeth De La Cruz Santana and Santiago Vaquera-Vasquez.
The Teaching Gender series publishes monographs, anthologies and reference books that deal centrally with gender and/or sexuality. The books are intended to be used in undergraduate and graduate classes across the disciplines. The series aims to promote social justice with an emphasis on feminist, multicultural and critical perspectives.
This book is an introduction to the role played by Spanish formal education in providing feminist pedagogies to adolescents and young people, throughout the first two decades of the 21st century. The images of Spanish feminist protests in recent years, with a considerable presence of young girls but also boys, have spread around the world. But what is their relationship with gender-based inequalities? What is the role of formal education in their understanding of social reality? The authors combine a sociological and historical analysis of the social and educational changes that have taken place in Spanish youth during these decades, with a pedagogical orientation towards practice.
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What does it mean to be a young Muslim American woman in the US educational system? This book answers this question by presenting the counter-narratives of 15 young women. These accounts debunk prevalent stereotypes and biases, and reveal an educational climate marked by Islamophobia. Through these overall educational experiences, readers are able to explore the role of family, faith-based education, the mosque, and community in these women’s lives.

The social and academic learning opportunities showcase instances of both inclusion and marginalization which lead students to experience a double consciousness. What this study ultimately shows is that these students experience the dichotomous pull of religious and cultural values as they navigate their intersectional identities.
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This book examines themes from adult students in higher education: dispositional characteristics, situational barriers to academic success, and how institutional policy and procedures create obstacles for these non-traditional learners. While much has been written in the peer-reviewed literature about adult students, a commonly missing perspective is that of the students. In this book, adult learners write about their own conditions and contexts, bringing to light the gaps in institutional support for this growing community.

The rich narratives, case studies, and comprehensive reviews within chapters highlight the unique implications faced by this student population, and provide first-hand accounts on which institutions can acknowledge, value, and facilitate change for an evolved, equitable, and elevated educational experience.

Contributors are: Lucas Allen, Sandra Becker, Keith Burn, Adele Chadwick, Kathleen Clarke, Daniel Cleminson, Geremy Collom, Amy De Jaeger, Natalie Dewing, Lori Doan, Eli Duykers, Susan E. Elliott-Johns, Angelina Evans, Melanie Extance, Margaret Greenfields, Leahann Hendrickse, Troy Hill, Sophie Karanicolas, Rahul Kumar, Cobi Ladner, Beth Loveys, Dorothy Missingham, Barbara A.Nicolls, Katia Olsen, Sarah O'Shea, Julie Podrebarac, Carmen Rodríguez de France, Rebecca Rochon, Selina Sharma, Nicola Simmons, Matthew Slater, Sherrie Smith, Cathy Snelling, Cathy Stone, Ashleigh Taylor, Preeti Vayada, Monica Wice and Sinead Wright.
Queer studies is an extensive field that spans a range of disciplines. This volume focuses on education and educational research and examines and expounds upon queer studies particular to education fields. It works to examine concepts, theories, and methods related to queer studies across PK-12, higher education, adult education, and informal learning.

The volume takes an intentionally intersectional approach, with particular attention to the intersections of white supremacist cisheteropatriachy. It includes well-established concepts with accessible and entry-level explanations, as well as emerging and cutting-edge concepts in the field. It is designed to be used by those new to queer studies as well as those with established expertise in the field.
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Who am I? Where did I come from? What is a family? How do families of choice develop?

These questions permeate the pages of Scarecrow wherein a bisexual, nonbinary trans feminine person named Erin seeks to make sense of her life in relation to the places, people, and events she has seen and left behind over time. As the novel begins, Erin tells us that “39 funerals, 35 years, and too many lovers to bother remembering brought me to this point.” From this opening statement, Erin reflects on three-and-a-half decades of experiences growing up working class, white, and queer in the southeastern U.S.; navigating sexual, gender, classed, racial, and religious meanings and relationships; surviving varied types of love, trauma, kindness, and violence; and joining the upper-middle class world of the professoriate. As the novel progresses, she shows us how these experiences intertwine, create opportunities, and leave scars that together fashion who she has become over time and in relation to others.

Scarecrow could be utilized in the teaching of sociology, social psychology, Symbolic Interactionism, narrative, families, gender, sexualities, race, class, geography, biography, Southern Studies, LGBTQIA studies, trauma recovery, courses about aging and the life course, or of course, it could be read entirely for pleasure.
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The contributors to Amplified Voices, Intersecting Identities: First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power overcame deeply unequal educational systems to become the first in their families to finish college. Now, they are among the 3% of first-generation undergraduate students to go on to graduate school, in spite of structural barriers that worked against them.

These scholars write of socialization to the professoriate through the complex lens of intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social class.

These first-generation graduate students have crafted critical narratives of the structural obstacles within higher education that stand in the way of brilliant scholars who are poor and working-class, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, immigrant, queer, white, and women. They write of agency in creating defiant networks of support, of sustaining connections to family and communities, of their activism and advocacy on campus. They refuse to perpetuate the myths of meritocracy that reproduce the inequalities of higher education. In response to research literature and to campus programming that frames their identities around “need”, they write instead of agentive and politicized intersectional identities as first-generation graduate students, committed to institutional change through their research, teaching, and service.

Contributors are: Lamesha C. Brown, LaToya Brown, Altheria Caldera, Araceli Calderón, Marisa V. Cervantes, Joy Cobb, Raven K. Cokley, Francine R. Coston, Angela Gay, Josué R. López, Rebecca Morgan, Gloria A. Negrete-Lopez, Lisa S. Palacios, Takeshia Pierre, Alejandra I. Ramírez, Matt Reid, Ebony Russ, Jaye Sablan, Travis Smith, Phitsamay S. Uy, Jane A. Van Galen, Jason K. Wallace and Lin Wu.
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What if normative gender standards were legally enforced? How would our institutions inform and enforce these rules and regulations? What would be the consequences of failing to comply with gender expression standards? It’s in the midst of this maelstrom that we join Alex, our genderfluid and nonbinary protagonist who, during the thick of their adolescence, must navigate the choppy waters of lust, love, friendship, schooling, loss, and their city’s rigid – and perhaps lethal – gender expectations. In this world, Alex must constantly exchange their true self for safety and compliance, a relentless transaction from which they feel they never will escape. Can they navigate this slippery slope, alongside their patchwork community of friends and allies? Or is arrest and social persecution inevitable?

This novel is an honest and raw examination of queer lives. Gender Optics will illustrate, interrogate, and challenge the harmful products of binary hegemonic systems that all too often push gender variant folks to the fringes of society. While Gender Optics can be read purely for pleasure, it can also be used as supplemental reading for courses in critical theory, gender theory, gender and sexuality studies, LGBTQ studies, intersectionality, and arts-based research.
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Award-Winning Finalist! 2022 American Fiction Awards—Inspirational and Mystery/Suspense: Romantic Suspense
Winner, First Place! 2022 The BookFest Awards, Romance Urban, Women’s Thriller & Suspense, and Mystery, Thriller & Suspense
Winner! Independent Press Award 2022 Distinguished Favorites – Romantic Suspense
Winner of the 2022 International Impact Book Awards--Women's Fiction and Romance!

Twinkle follows Tess Lee and Jack Miller after two years of marriage. Tess is a wildly successful and world-famous novelist. Her inspirational books explore our innermost struggles and the human need to believe that there is light at the end of the tunnel. Jack is a federal agent. After spending decades immersed in a violent world, a residue remains. As they both heal from past trauma, their epic love, fostered by their ability to truly see one another, has brought them true happiness. However, when an anonymous threat is made against Tess’s life, everything changes. Will they learn to lean on each other, or will they fall apart into the darkness? Their friends are along for the ride: Omar, Tess’s sarcastic best friend, who calls her Butterfly; the female president of the United States, who Tess visits regularly to discuss politics and bake cookies; Joe, Jack’s friend from the Bureau, who understands the sacrifices he’s made; and Bobby, Jack’s younger friend, who never fails to lend a calming presence. Twinkle is a novel about the nature of doubt, the struggle to feel worthy of love, the relationship of the small part to the greater whole, and the ways in which love – from lovers, friends, or the art we experience – can help us move from trauma to healing and redemption. Written as unfolding action, Twinkle is a poignant novel that moves fluidly between melancholy, humor, and joy. It can be read entirely for pleasure, selected for book clubs, or used as supplemental reading in a variety of courses in communication, psychology, social work, sociology, or women’s studies/gender studies.