Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 191 items for :

  • Social Justice x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
From this set of critical stories emerges a timely confession from marginalized imagined communities at the physical and metaphorical Mexican-American border. These hybrid storytellers create a multivalence of experiences and genres. Composers of this ground-breaking collection draw readers into an affective connection with the borderlands, offering critical examinations of legal status, gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, social class, family, and health. Additionally, creative representations across genres explore notions of geography, vulnerability, suffering, trauma, pain as well as joy, healing, and love. By posing questions about loss of innocence, they incite new literary and visual spaces for fusing together fragments of the remains of land, body, and/or being, all the while creating a site of fresh confessions where critical stories are illuminated collages assembled together from within la línea.

Contributors are: Kiri Avelar, Irving Ayala, Carmella J. Braniger, Roxana Fragoso Carrillo, Marisa V. Cervantes, Guadalupe Chavez, Julio Enríquez-Ornelas, Liliana Conlisk Gallegos, Verónica Gaona, Andrea Gómez, Filiberto Mares Hernández, Víctor M. Macías-González, Carol Mariano, Ana Silvia Monzón Monterroso, Juana Moriel-Payne, Rachel Neff, Jumko Ogata-Aguilar, José Olivarez, Isabela Ortega, Paul Pedroza, Jorge Omar Ramírez Pimienta, Raphaella Prange, Felipe Quetzalcoatl Quintanilla, Erica Reyes, Fidel García Reyes, Lizbeth De La Cruz Santana and Santiago Vaquera-Vasquez.
Integrating Research on Education and Citizenship in the Context of Migration
This interdisciplinary volume on The Challenge of Radicalization and Extremism: Integrating Research on Education and Citizenship in the Context of Migration addresses the need for educational researchers to place their work in a broader social and political context by connecting it to the current and highly relevant issue of extremism and radicalization. It is just as important for researchers of extremism and radicalization to strengthen their conceptual links with educational fields, especially with education for democratic citizenship, as for researchers in education to get more familiar with issues of migration. This book meets a current shortage of research that addresses these issues across subjects and disciplines to inform both scientific and professional stakeholders in the educational and social sectors.

The volume is divided into three parts. The first part, Foundations, provides fundamental research on radicalization and the rejection of democratic values. In the second part, Analysis of Preconditions within the Educational Context, key risk and protective factors against radicalization for young people are explored. Finally, the third part, Approaches for Prevention and Intervention, offers concrete suggestions for prevention and intervention methods within formal and informal educational contexts. The contributions show how new avenues for prevention can be explored through integrating citizenship education’s twofold function to assimilate and to empower.
Series Editor:
In this series, we are establishing a new tradition in the sociology of education. Like many fields, the sociology of education has largely assumed that the field develops through the steady accumulation of studies. Thomas Kuhn referred to this as ‘normal science.’ Yet normal science builds on a paradigm shift, elaborating and expanding the paradigm. What has received less attention are the works that contribute to paradigm shifts themselves. To remedy this, we will focus on books that move the field in dramatic and recognizable ways—what can be called breakthroughs.
Kuhn was analyzing natural science and was been less sure his ideas fit the social sciences. Yet it is likely that the social sciences are more subject to paradigm shifts than the natural sciences because the social sciences are fed back into the social world. Thus sociology and social life react to each other, and are less able separate the knower from the known. With reactivity of culture and knowledge, the social sciences follow a more complex process than that of natural science. This is clearly the case with the sociology of education. The multiplicity of theories and methods mix with issues of normativity—in terms of what constitutes good research, policy and/or practice.
Moreover, the sociology of education is increasingly global in its reach—meaning that the national interests are now less defining of the field and more interrogative of what is important to know. This makes the sociology of education even more complex and multiple in its paradigm configurations. The result is both that there is less shared agreement on the social facts of education but more vibrancy as a field. What we know and understand is shifting on multiple fronts constantly. Breakthroughs is to the series for works that push the boundaries—a place where all the books do more than contribute to the field, they remake the field in fundamental ways. Books are selected precisely because they change how we understand both education and the sociology of education.
Series Editor:
Critical Leaders and the Foundation of Disability Studies in Education aims to formalize the significance of early histories of understanding disability drawn from the scholarship of those who turned away from conventional status quo and pathologized constructs commonly accepted worldwide to explain disability in schools and society. The series begins with recognition of North American scholars including: Ellen Brantlinger, Lous Heshusius, Steve Taylor, Doug Biklen, and Thomas M. Skrtic. We will expand the series to include scholars from several international countries who likewise formed analyses that shaped the terrain for the emergence of critical perspectives that have endured and slowly given rise to the interdisciplinary field of Disability Studies in Education.

Critical Leaders and the Foundation of Disability Studies in Education is a sub-series to the book series Studies in Inclusive Education. The series and subseries have independent editorial teams that work closely together. For the volumes published in the main book series, please visit its webpage.
Series Editor:
On (De)Coloniality: Curriculum Within and Beyond the West is a beacon in the struggle against epistemicide and the colonialities of being, power, and knowledge. It attempts to bring to the fore an analysis that focuses on non-Western/non-Eurocentric epistemological frameworks. In a world that still struggles to see its own overt epistemological diversity, On (De)Coloniality is an open space in which to challenge epistemological fascism. It encourages curriculum scholars to engage in dialogues about non-Western/non-Eurocentric epistemologies within and beyond the Western Eurocentric platform. We invite ‘complicated conversations’ that dig into new avenues such as those of Itinerant Curriculum Theory (ICT), and, in so doing, introduce a new language that helps to open despotic epistemological canons, and dares to promote a different way of thinking and talking about the educational and curriculum phenomena.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by e-mail to the Aquisitions Editor, John Bennett.
Poetic Narratives for Racial Equity, Equality, Healing, and Freedom
What does it mean to be Black in America? In this book, Pierre W. Orelus uses his poetry to unpack this question, unmasking racism, sexism, and oppression in America. The 59 poems in this collection deal with a wide range of topics, from immigration to xenophobia, from Black pride to Black rage, from parenting to female empowerment.

Since the dawn of time, poetry and stories have been used to address social issues while inspiring at the same time deep, imaginary, and philosophical thoughts. This book combines poetry with short stories situated in very specific historical, racial, socio-economic, and cultural contexts to examine the existential experiences of Brown and Black people in the Americas, particularly in the United States of America, with systemic racism, voucher capitalism, xenophobia, and sexism, among other social wrongs.
Educational equity, inclusion, belonging, and justice are widely considered to be the most important civil rights challenge of the 21st century. Many HBCUs began in the 1800s as institutions to prepare Black teachers to teach in segregated America. Although their focus has expanded since their critical beginnings, HBCUs remain significant producers of African American teachers. Today, as the United States grapples with educational disparities, lack of diversity among education professionals, systemic racism, and the recent politically-inspired assaults on Critical Race Theory, we need HBCU leadership in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade education more than ever. Black College Leadership in PK–12 Education amplifies the research and perspectives of HBCU leaders, including four HBCU education deans, on how HBCUs help school districts optimize education for Black preschool, elementary and secondary students. Specific topics include HBCU teacher preparation, building HBCU and PK–12 partnerships, culturally responsive teaching, inclusive assessment practices, and HBCU leadership in STEM education. This book is ideal for school teachers and administrators who want to use HBCUs as a resource to improve education, as well as HBCU leaders who want to work more effectively with local school districts.
Winner of the 2022 AESA Critics' Choice Book Award

This book offers a critical perspective of the education of the Latinx populations around the world. Whether they are first-generation immigrants, new immigrants, or native born, the research presented in this book pulls from the authors’ personal experiences and their students’ experiences and their rich and diverse cultures to connect with and inspire those interested in learning about the reality of Latinx populations in the US and beyond.

The Latinx research described in this book aims at combatting deficit perspectives among educators and the public. It has taken on the task of highlighting the knowledges and experiences of Latinx students and their communities as strengths and resources to transform curriculum, teaching, and schooling. These chapters craft pedagogies and highlight initiatives that directly work against hegemonic and colonizing practices and schooling. As a result, this book critiques oppressive curriculum and instead recognizes the teacher as a critical actor.
Author:
This collection of essays incorporates some of the most important and longstanding foundational texts in education developed by the leading educational neo-Gramscian social theorist Peter McLaren. The volume provides a much necessary framework for understanding more precisely not only the historical and philosophical foundations for McLaren’s ideas, but even more importantly, it unpacks a clear understanding of the dynamics of ideological production framing the epistemicidal nature of capitalist schools.

The chapters provide state of the art approaches grounded in both Marxist social theory and ‘post-critical’ sensibilities. They show the unique opportunities provided by critical theoretical approaches towards revolutionary pedagogies which are crucial to address the current challenges one is facing locally, nationally, and internationally.

"Critical Theory: Rituals, Pedagogies and Resistance speaks to the current challenges we face as humanity, not only situating them historically, but also securitizing the role that our educational institutions, curriculum matrixes and teacher education programs have played in such social havoc. It provides crucial insights, not only to help a better understanding of the accomplishments produced by the critical educational and curriculum river in the struggle against the educational and curriculum epistemicide, but also to help explore alternative ways responsive to the world’s endless epistemological difference and diversity. While the future of our field needs to go beyond Peter McLaren’s intellectual thesaurus, it cannot certainly avoid going through him. The itinerant curriculum theory – and the ICTheorists – are conscious about that." – João M. Paraskeva, Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, University of Strathclyde
Volume Editors: , , and
This volume provides an exciting introduction to social wellbeing and different epistemological standpoints. Targeted at researchers, students, academics, policy makers, practitioners and activists, the volume allows stakeholders to collectively problematise and address marginalised populations’ social wellbeing, providing perspectives and applications from various disciplines such as education, health, public policy and social welfare. Chapters continue to debate social wellbeing within their disciplines, and challenges practitioners’ and researchers’ experience, particularly interactions between individual and social aspects of wellbeing. Contributors provide practical and academic discussions, drawing upon different cultural, historical, political and social paradigms, putting forward available empirical data.

Contributors are: Andrew Azzopardi, Amanda Bezzina, Trevor Calafato, Joanne Cassar, Marlene Cauchi, Carmel Cefai, Marilyn Clark, Maureen Cole, Katya De Giovanni, Melanie E. Demarco, Andreana Dibben, Ruth Falzon, Marvin Formosa, Natalie Kenely, Dione Mifsud, Brenda Murphy, Claudia Psaila, Sandra Scicluna, Anabel Scolaro, Miriam Teuma, Anna Maria Vella, Sue Vella and Carla Willing,