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Editor:
Brill's Series in Jewish Studies aims to publish new knowledge and deepen our understanding of Jews and Judaism, through the lens of their engagement with non-Jewish populations and cultures throughout history. This aim reflects the fact that not only Jewish experiences but also Jewish ideologies emerged, originally and consciously, in the context of and in relation to other communities, cultures and powers. Within these thematic parameters, the scope of the Series is limited neither to the Diaspora, nor to any period, method or discipline.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
The Brill Reference Library of Judaism presents research on fundamental problems in the study of the authoritative texts, beliefs and practices, events and ideas, of the Judaic religious world from the Hellenistic period to the present. Systematic accounts of principal phenomena characteristic of Judaic life, works of a theoretical character, accounts of movements and trends, diverse expressions of the faith, all will find a place in the series, alongside new translations of and commentaries on classical texts.

The series published an average of 3,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Scholarly monographs on topics in the iconography of Judaism.
Conference Proceedings of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College London
The IJS Studies in Judaica series is primarily devoted to the publication of annual conferences of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College London, although individual monographs are also welcome on any aspect of Jewish Studies and related disciplines. The volumes bring together, often for the first time, eminent scholars from different countries working in historical, literary, and linguistic research areas relevant to all periods of Jewish Studies, from antiquity to modernity. Examples of themes include biblical studies (within the ancient world), medieval Hebrew science, and history of Zionism, with the aim being to cover the latest trends in cutting-edge research in Jewish Studies in its broadest context.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Judaism and Christianity share much of a heritage. There has been a good deal of interest of late in this phenomenon, examining both this common heritage, as well as the elements unique to each religion. There has, however, been no systematic attempt to present findings relative to both Jewish and Christian tradition to a broad audience of scholars. It is the aim of this series to do just that.
Jewish and Christian Perspectives publishes studies that are relevant to both Christianity and Judaism. The series includes works relating to the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, the Second Temple period, the Judaeo-Christian polemic (from ancient to modern times), Rabbinical literature relevant to Christianity, Patristics, Medieval Studies and the modern period. Special interest is paid to the interaction between the religions throughout the ages. Historical, exegetical, philosophical and theological studies are welcomed as well as studies focusing on sociological and anthropological issues common to both religions including archaeology.
The series is published in co-operation with the Bar-Ilan University and the Schechter Institute in Israel, the Faculty of Catholic Theology of the Tilburg University and the Protestant Theological University in the Netherlands. It includes monographs and congress volumes in the English language, and is intended for international distribution on a scholarly level.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.

This series brings together contributions addressing the question of the unity versus conflict, closeness versus alienation, and convergence versus divergence entrenched in the infinite variety of collective identities illustrated by Jews in this era. The titles included investigate—each volume under its own angle—the principles, narratives, visions and commands which constitute in different places the essentials of Jewishness. As a rule, they ask whether or not one is still allowed to speak, at the beginning of this new century, of one—single and singular—Jewish People. Hence, this series is a podium for researchers of Judaism and the Jewish condition all over the world—from Israel to the United States, and from there to Argentina and Brazil as well as Russia, Ukraine or France, England and Germany. These investigations should yield an understanding of how far Judaism is still one while Jewishness is multifarious. The perspectives offered may draw from sociology and the social sciences as well as from history and the humanities in general. This series aspires to constitute a meeting point for them all. It will be of interest not only to scholars in Jewish Studies but also to anyone interested in the theory and practice of major phenomena of our time like transnational diasporas, the globalization of ethnicity, and present-day relations of religiosity and laicity which, in one way or another, are akin to the preoccupations of researchers in the field of Jewish identities.

The series published an average of four volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Karaite Judaism emerged in the 9th century—an exciting and challenging new stream of medieval Jewish identity and thought which challenged the notions of traditional rabbinic Judaism by rejecting, on the one hand, the sanctified tradition of Jewish oral law and the authority of the ancient Rabbis, while on the other hand re-centering on the text of Hebrew Bible as the sole source of Jewish religion. This Brill subseries, entitled Karaite Texts and Studies, edited by Meira Polliack (Tel-Aviv University) and Michael G. Wechsler (Moody Bible Institute, Chicago) serves as a locus of investigation into medieval Karaism, based on the testimony of its extensive written remains. The recent efflorescence of scholarship on Karaism has provided the impetus for the establishment of the Karaite Texts and Studies series which appears in association with Études sur le judaïsme medieval. The series focuses on the “Golden Age” of Karaism in the Near East (the 10th through 12th centuries) and it covers all genres of Karaite literature, written in Hebrew, Judaeo-Arabic, or other languages.
Editor:
The series is uniquely devoted to Judeo-Slavic studies. It covers all aspects of the history and culture of Jews in the Slavic world and the encounter between Jewish and Slavic cultures (including language, literature, and arts) from the Middle Ages to the present day. The series aims to provide a forum for the growing interest and research in the field across disciplines. It welcomes monographs, collected volumes, and editions of primary sources.

Submission Information:
Proposals may be submitted to Alexander Kulik (akulik@mscc.huji.ac.il) and should include a brief (up to one page) description including the following items: author(s)/editor(s) names with addresses and affiliations; tentative title; topic; scope; significance; research method; innovation; relation to/difference from similar publications; target audience; date of submission; and provisional table of contents (optional).

The series published an average of one volume per year for the last 5 years.