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In der international ausgerichteten Reihe "Encounters between Judaism and Christianity" erscheinen wissenschaftliche Arbeiten zu Konstituierungs- und Differenzierungsprozessen jüdischer und christlicher Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart. Die Einzelbände behandeln exegetisch-hermeneutische, historische, systematische, kulturwissenschaftliche und zeitgeschichtliche Aspekte des Themenfeldes in der Verantwortung der einzelnen Fachdisziplinen und zugleich in fächerübergreifender Perspektive. Ein besonderes Augenmerk der Studien gilt den religiösen und kulturellen Kontaktpunkten und Reibungsflächen zwischen Judentum und Christentum, deren wissenschaftliche Betrachtung dem gegenseitigen Verständnis nach einer langen Geschichte kirchlicher Judenfeindschaft neue Impulse zu geben vermag.

The internationally focused series Encounters between Judaism and Christianity publishes studies on the processes of formation and differentiation of Jewish and Christian religion past and present. SJC-volumes deal with exegetical-hermeneutical, historical, systematic, cultural-historical and contemporary issues according to the standards of the individual disciplines and from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Particular attention is paid to the areas both of cultural interaction and of friction between Judaism and Christianity. After a long history of ecclesiastical hostility against Jews and after the experiences of the 20th century the scholarly examination of these topics can provide new impulses for improving mutual understanding.
Volume Editors: and
"Das Frankfurter Neue Testament (FNT) ist die erste deutsche Übersetzung der Bibel, die sich konsequent am Griechischen des 1. Jahrhunderts orientiert, ohne Rücksicht auf kirchlich-konfessionelle Hörgewohnheiten zu nehmen. Das FNT vereint philologische Präzision mit theologischer Fachkompetenz. Möglichst nah am Original erschließt diese Übersetzung neue Sichtweisen auf scheinbar Vertrautes und führt so zu einem faszinierenden Leseerlebnis.

Editionsplan:
Bd. 1: Die Johannesapokalypse, mit einem Essay zur Übersetzungstheorie, Januar 2020
Bd. 2: Die Evangelien nach Matthäus und Markus, mit einem Essay zum Koinegriechisch neutestamentlicher Schriften, 2021
Bd. 3: Das Evangelium nach Johannes und die drei Johannesbriefe, mit einem Essay zur Frage eines „Corpus Johanneum“, 2022
Bd. 4: Das Evangelium nach Lukas und die Apostelgeschichte, mit einem Essay zum Beitrag der neutestamentlichen Schriften zur kollektiven Identitätsbildung, 2023
Bd. 5: Briefe des Apostels Paulus: Römerbrief, Erster und Zweiter Korintherbrief, Galaterbrief, Philipperbrief, Erster Thessalonicherbrief, Philemonbrief, mit einem Essay zu Antagonismen in den paulinischen Briefen, 2024
Bd. 6: Neutestamentliche Briefliteratur: Epheserbrief, Kolosserbrief, Zweiter Thessalonicherbrief, Erster und Zweiter Timotheusbrief, Titusbrief, Hebräerbrief, Jakobusbrief, Erster und Zweiter Petrusbrief, Judasbrief, mit einem Essay zur sogenannten Pseudepigraphie, 2025

Lesung der Johannesapokalypse: Peter Schröder, Ensemblemitglied am Schauspiel Frankfurt, liest die Johannesapokalypse, neu übersetzt von Stefan Alkier und Thomas Paulsen.
Hier können Sie die Videos bei YouTube anschauen.
Series Editors: and
Brill’s Studies in Systematic Theology is a series in constructive theology, treating traditional doctrinal loci in the light of contemporary concerns. It has a strong interest in the theological engagement with Scripture, as well as the creative rereading of significant historical theologians. It includes monographs by both new and established scholars, as well as edited volumes.
Theology in Practice extends the horizons of practical theology. It promises to enrich the intellectual discourse and supply material of interest to academic professionals and graduate students. It will feature developments in the theories of practice, experience, culture, and action that define the discipline, while also attending to the close study of lived faith. Its authors will range from senior scholars presenting mature research to young scholars pursuing promising fresh avenues. The series is also open to edited volumes on emerging topics. Its audiences will be practical theologians and other interested scholars in established and emerging geographical, institutional, and religious contexts.
Theology in Practice aims to explore and reconstruct the centers and margins of practical theological discourse. The series will be marked by interdisciplinary conversations with related fields, such as feminist, liberation, or systematic/constructive theologies, while also exploring new domains, such as comparative/interreligious, sexual, postcolonial, post-Christian, and critical racial-ethnic studies. Concerned with ministry and religious leadership, it will address multiple expressions of Christianity, fostering the development of cognate research in other religions and in secular formations that take practice, action, and performance as central concerns.
Salo W. Baron was considered the greatest Jewish historian of the twentieth century. He laid the ground work for how Jews perceive themselves and are perceived by others. The present series publishes new perspectives in the research on the Jewish experience of both distinguished and aspiring scholars who continue Salo Baron’s work. Contributions to the series focus on the relationship of Jews and non-Jews and perceptions and understandings of Judaism, including but not limited to the history, culture, religion, and institutions of the Jewish people, as well as on their persecution.
Author:
During the Second Temple period (516 BCE–70 CE), Jews became reticent to speak and write the divine name, YHWH, also known by its four letters in Greek as the tetragrammaton. Priestly, pious, and scribal circles limitted the use of God’s name, and then it disappeared. The variables are poorly understood and the evidence is scattered. This study brings together all ancient Jewish literary and epigraphic evidence in Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek to describe how, when, and in what sources Jews either used or avoided the divine name. Instead of a diachronic contrast from use to avoidance, as is often the scholarly assumption, the evidence suggests diverse and overlapping naming practices that draw specific meaning from linguistic, geographic, and social contexts.
Classification is an inherent feature of all societies. The distinction between Jews and non-Jews has been a major theme of Western society for over two millennia. In the middle of the twentieth century, dire consequences were associated with being Jew ish. Even after the Shoah, the labelling of Jews as “other” continued. In this book, leading historians including Michael Brenner, Elisheva Carlebach and Michael Miller illuminate the meaning of Jewishness from pre-modern and early-modern times to the present day. Their studies offer new perspectives on constructing and experiencing Jewish identity.
A Study of the Reformed Scholastic Theologians William Twisse (1578–1646) and John Owen (1616–1683)
The seventeenth century Reformed Orthodox discussions of the work of Christ and its various doctrinal constitutive elements were rich and multifaceted, ranging across biblical and exegetical, historical, philosophical, and theological fields of inquiry. Among the most contested questions in these discussions was the question of the necessity of Christ’s satisfaction. This study sets that “great controverted point,” as Richard Baxter called it, in its historical and traditionary contexts and provides a philosophical and theological analysis of the arguments offered by two representative Reformed scholastic theologians, William Twisse and John Owen.