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Author: Seyfullah Hasar
Examining the legality of foreign military intervention in internal conflicts with the consent of the government, this book gives and analyses a to-the-point account of post-Cold War State practice with more than 45 incidents of such interventions on a scale neglected in current scholarship. Owing to this account, it also manages to engage in peripheral aspects of the subject overlooked in the literature, such as the impact of an ineffective arms embargo on a consensual intervention, or the consequences of the invocation by an intervening State of both consent and its right to self-defence. The book also examines, among others, the issue of the legal legitimacy and recognition of governments, the rules that can considerably constrain the scope of consensual interventions under certain circumstances, and the challenging and under-addressed implications of consensual interventions for the crime of aggression.
This book examines the importance of international criminal law in promoting and defending human rights as well as its relationship with law and international politics. It highlights criminal cases at the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunals for Rwanda, the International Criminal Court, and the International Crimes Tribunal of Bangladesh. The book considers human rights approaches to crimes from a theoretical and practical perspective, analyses various crimes under international law, and examines the application, implementation and enforcement of international criminal law.

This book will serve as an important reference for students, teachers, scholars and lawyers specialising in international human rights, international criminal law and international humanitarian law.
The Legal Regulation of Environmental Crime - The International and European Dimension provides a comprehensive analysis of the international and EU legal regimes for tackling environmental crime. The book includes an in-depth analysis of the major international conventions as they relate to the regulation of environmental crime (CITES, Basel, MARPOL) and provides a holistic overview of the evolution and content of EU law in the field of environmental crime, covering substantive criminal law harmonisation, judicial cooperation and the role of EU criminal justice bodies and agencies (Europol, Eurojust and the EPPO) in fighting environmental crime. Further, the book addresses key recent policy and legislative developments in the field and offers a timely contribution to legal reform in view of the publication of new proposals on legislation on environmental crime at EU level.
War crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and the crime of aggression (so-called ‘core crimes’) often could not be committed without financial assistance. This book examines the basis for individual criminal liability under international law for persons who finance core crimes. Despite the need for clear rules, neither international courts nor scholars agree upon whether or not, or under what circumstances, such liability exists.
To determine the minimum standard of liability, this work analyses the legal rules relating to complicity, both under international criminal law and domestically in twenty selected jurisdictions in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, North America and Oceania. The aim of these analyses is to determine whether there are general principles of law recognised by the community of States regarding the minimum standard of liability for aiders and abettors.
This book proposes a comparative framework for assessing legal rules relating to complicity, and it advances a normative claim as to how legal rules should be structured concerning the criminal responsibility of individuals who finance the commission of core crimes.
The analysis of the applicable international law and the comparative analysis of national jurisdictions lead to the conclusion that, currently, the minimum standard of knowledge for aiding and abetting is active knowledge. However, the author argues that this standard should be revised to include wilful blindness. Regarding the intent requirement, the analyses find that dolus eventualis is included in the definition of intent.
This book comprehensively covers the entire scope of conflicting rights and duties of the fighting parties and international humanitarian relief actors in non-international armed conflicts, namely from the moment of the initiation of international humanitarian relief actions till their authorisation and throughout the consecutive stages of the delivery of relief. From the practice of frontline humanitarian negotiations, this book reconceptualizes how those rights and duties are coming into being and how compliance with agreements on humanitarian access and other international humanitarian law and international human rights norms can be ensured and/or their normativity can be strengthened.
Belligerents’ Detention Practices in Afghanistan, Syria and Ukraine
Author: Jelena Plamenac
Winner of the 2022 Francis Lieber Prize

This book explores how States and armed groups deprive us of liberty in armed conflict. Intriguing insights into original field records of internal laws and first-hand testimonies by fighters and humanitarians reveal hidden patterns of belligerents’ controversial behaviours in relation to three complex aspects of security detention in non-international armed conflict that remain unsettled in international law – permissible grounds, procedural guarantees, and transfer standards. As you flip through the pages of this fascinating book, you will gain a new understanding of where the boundary of unlawful confinement lies between local and international law and why we need a new international legal framework to protect us from arbitrariness in the warring parties’ decision to detain.

This book has won the 2022 Francis Lieber prize, awarded at ASIL, for the best monograph published on the law of armed conflict.
Genocide, Civil War, and the Transformation of International Law
Listen to the podcast with Philip Drew and Bruce Oswald

In Rwanda Revisited: Genocide, Civil War, and the Transformation of International Law, the contributing authors seek to recount, explore, and explain the tragedy that was the Rwanda genocide and the nature of the international community’s entanglement with it. Written by people selected for their personalized knowledge of Rwanda, be it as peacekeepers, aid workers, or members of the ICTR, and/or scholarship that has been clearly influenced by the genocide, this book provides a level of insight, detail and first-hand knowledge about the genocide and its aftermath that is clearly unique. Included amongst the writers are a number of scholars whose research and writings on Rwanda, the United Nations, and genocide are internationally recognized.

Contributors are: Major (ret’d) Brent Beardsley, Professor Jean Bou, Professor Jane Boulden, Dr. Emily Crawford, Lieutenant-General the Honourable Romeo Dallaire, Professor Phillip Drew, Professor Mark Drumbl , Professor Jeremy Farrall, Lieutenant-General John Frewen, Dr. Stacey Henderson, Professor Adam Jones, Ambassador Colin Keating, Professor Robert McLaughlin, Linda Melvern, Dr. Melanie O’Brien, Professor Bruce Oswald, Dr. Tamsin Phillipa Paige, Professor David J. Simon, and Professor Andrew Wallis.

This book was previously published as Special Issue of the Journal of International Peacekeeping, Volume 22 (2018), Issue 1-4 (published April 2020); with updated Introduction.
In this book academic and police officer Erik van de Sandt researches the security practices of cyber criminals. While their protective practices are not necessarily deemed criminal by law, the countermeasures of cyber criminals frequently deviate from prescribed bona fide cyber security standards. This book is the first to present a full picture on these deviant security practices, based on unique access to confidential police sources related to some of the world's most serious and organized cyber criminals. The findings of this socio-technical-legal research prove that deviant security is an academic field of study on its own, and will help a non-technical audience to understand cyber security and the challenges of investigating cyber crime.
Author: Yudan Tan
In The Rome Statute as Evidence of Customary International Law, Yudan Tan offers a detailed analysis of topical issues concerning the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court as evidence of customary international law. The 1998 Rome Statute has generated a great deal of scholarly interest. Providing a novel way of analysing the treaty-custom interactions, Yudan Tan examines the customary status of essential parts of the Rome Statute. Based on a flexible two-element identification approach, focusing more on opinio juris, Yudan Tan convincingly argues that provisions of the Rome Statute were partly declaratory of custom when adopted in 1998, and that they are also partly declaratory of custom at the present time.
History, lex lata and Developments de lege ferenda
Author: Kathrin Strobel
This book presents the first comprehensive study of international criminal jurisdiction over organized crime. Taking into account a broad range of profit-generating crimes, including human trafficking, migrant smuggling, drug trafficking, and illicit trade in arms and ammunition, Strobel draws a concise picture of who can be prosecuted for what under which circumstances by analysing the current legal framework as defined by the Rome Statute, and by discussing future developments that could further facilitate such prosecutions.
Whereas international criminal law in the strict sense has long been considered not to apply to organized crime, Strobel convincingly demonstrates that international criminal prosecutions hold underexploited potential to bring leaders of cartels and trafficking rings to justice.