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This series is discontinued.

Philosophy in Latin America is a special series of philosophical books that pertain to all areas of value inquiry in the region. Its goal is to introduce the core content of Latin American philosophy to English-speaking readers.
Historical Trajectories, Indigenous Cultures, Scholastic Thought, and Reception in History
The Transatlantic Las Casas demonstrates the vitality of Lascasian studies. An impressive ensemble of scholars spanning the fields of Latin American studies, philosophy, theology, anthropology, law, literary criticism, and ethnohistory illuminate the complex intellectual web surrounding the controversial figure of Bartolomé de las Casas.

This volume offers sophisticated explorations of colonial Latin American and early modern Iberian studies by Laura Ammon, Thomas Eggensperger, O.P., Natsuko Matsumori, Timothy A. McCallister, Luis Mora Rodríguez, David Thomas Orique, O.P., María Cristina Ríos Espinosa, Rady Roldán-Figueroa, Mario Ruíz Sotelo, Frauke Sachse, Rubén A. Sánchez-Godoy, John F. Schwaller, Garry Sparks, Vanina M. Teglia, Dwight E.R. TenHuisen, Paola Uparela, Ramón Darío Valdivia Giménez, Andrew L. Wilson, and Victor Zorrilla.
Views of the Cuban Communist Party on the Collapse of Soviet and Eastern European Socialism
In Cuba Was Different, Even Sandvik Underlid explores the views of Cuban authorities, official press, and Party members as they reflect back on the collapse of Soviet and Eastern European socialism. In so doing, he contributes to a better understanding as to why the Cuban system – often associated with Fidel Castro’s leadership – did not itself collapse. Despite the loss of its most important allies, key ideological referents, and even most of its foreign trade, Cuba did not embrace capitalism.

The author critically examines and analyzes the collapse of the USSR and Eastern Europe as reported in the Cuban Communist Party newspaper Granma, both as they unfolded and subsequently through the lens of additional interviews with individual Party members. This focus on Cuba’s Communist Party provides new perspectives on how these events were seen from Cuba and on the notable resilience of many party members.
Contesting Neo-Liberalism by Occupying Companies, Creating Cooperatives, and Recuperating Autogestión
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In Workers’ Self-Management in Argentina, Marcelo Vieta homes in on the emergence and consolidation of Argentina’s empresas recuperadas por sus trabajadores (ERTs, worker-recuperated enterprises), a workers’ occupy movement that surged at the turn-of-the-millennium in the thick of the country’s neo-liberal crisis. Since then, around 400 companies have been taken over and converted to cooperatives by almost 16,000 workers. Grounded in class-struggle Marxism and a critical sociology of work, the book situates the ERT movement in Argentina’s long tradition of working-class activism and the broader history of workers’ responses to capitalist crisis. Beginning with the voices of the movement’s protagonists, Vieta ultimately develops a compelling social theory of autogestión – a politically prefigurative and ethically infused notion of workers’ self-management that unleashes radical social change for work organisations, surrounding communities, and beyond.

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José Aricó and the New Latin American Marxism
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To speak of ‘Latin American Marxism’ is to announce a problem. To what extent can Marxism, a theoretical universe forged from nineteenth-century European experiences, also be productive for grasping other realities? How can we begin to make sense of the historical disconnection between that specific corpus of ideas and Latin America’s popular movements? Martín Cortés addresses these questions by considering the trajectory and works of José Aricó, who sought to rethink and disseminate in Spanish not only the works of Marx himself, but also those of foundational socialist thinkers such as Antonio Gramsci.
Guided by an interest in Marxism’s renovation, Cortés explores Aricó’s vital contributions to key topics in political theory, such as the nation, the state, the political subject, and hegemony.
In this important contribution to political theory, Massimo Modonesi develops the thesis that a Marxist theory of political action can be developed from the notion of antagonism, defined as a distinctive feature of struggle and of the political experience of insubordination. The author argues this central idea with close reference to the concept of class struggle. He advances a theoretical proposal based on the triad subalternity-antagonism-autonomy, as well as the uneven and combined character of the processes of political subjectification. At the center of this triad, the concept of antagonism stands out as a logical principle and the core of a Marxist theory of political action. At the same time, subalternism reappears frequently, as the counter-pole of antagonistic activation and autonomous practices, and as the root of what Antonio Gramsci calls ‘passive revolutions’.
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This book, winner of the 2007 Siglo XXI International Essay Prize, is unique in its approach to exile and offers remarkable insights into the subject. It discusses both human nature and the phenomenon of exile with depth and exactness from the combined perspectives of philosophy, morality, politics, anthropology, and history. After retracing the lessons learned through diverse experiences of exile from antiquity to modern times, it uses poetry as metatestimony to examine exile, subjectivity, and the many moral and political implications involved. The result is a series of thoughtprovoking connections between exile and the way we assume our lives.
Emblematics and the Brazilian Avant-Garde (1920-30s)
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In Antropofagia, Aarnoud Rommens shows how this Brazilian avant-garde movement (1920-30s) deconstructed early tendencies in the European vanguard. Through imaginative re-readings, the author reinterprets Antropofagia’s central texts and images as elements within an ever-changing, neo-baroque memory palace. Not only does the movement subvert established conceptions of the pre- and postcolonial; it is also a counter-colonial critique of verbal and visual literacy. To do justice to the dynamic between visibility and legibility, Rommens develops the inventive methodology of ‘emblematics’. The book’s implications are wide-ranging, prompting a revaluation of the avant-garde as a transmedial tactic for disrupting our reading and viewing habits.
The present studies on Brazilian modern art seek to specify some of the dominant contradictions of capitalism’s combined but uneven development as these appear from the global ‘periphery’. The grand project of Brasília is the main theme of the first two chapters, which treat the ‘ideal city’ as a case study in the ways in which creative talent in Brazil has been made to serve in the reproduction of social iniquities whose origins can be traced back to the agrarian latifundia. Further chapters scrutinise the socio-historical basis of Brazilian art, and develop, against the grain of the most prominent art historical approaches to modern Brazilian culture, a critical approach to the distinctly Brazilian visual language of geometrical abstraction. The book contends that, from the fifties up to today, formalism in Brazil has expressed the hegemony of the market.
Art History as Social Praxis: The Collected Writings of David Craven brings together more than thirty essays that chart the development of Craven’s voice as an unorthodox Marxist who applied historical materialism to the study of modern art. This book demonstrates the range and versatility of David Craven’s praxis as a ‘democratic socialist’ art historian who assessed the essential role the visual arts play in imagining more just and equitable societies. The essays collected here reveal Craven’s lifelong commitment to exposing interstices between western and non-western cultures by researching the reciprocating influences between First- and Third-World artists, critics and historians.