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What holds a society together, what makes it dissolve, and how is a society in crisis restored? These are the questions explored in this study, which brings the Serek ha-Yahad (IQS) into dialogue with mimetic theory. It thus aims to shed light on the forms of life and thought in the yahad, as well as on their underlying reason and purpose.
From the analysis emerges an image of a community that not only has a strong awareness of the mechanisms of violence, but also of its cure. Its hierarchical organization and strict regulations are motivated by a perceived dissolution of contemporary society. By subordinating personal desire to community discipline and by establishing a system of differentiation, the yahad seeks to provide a model of how a society ought to be functioning.
Hermeneutic Foundations of aš-Šāṭibī's Ethical Philosophy
Virtue and the Common Good: Hermeneutic Foundations of aš-Šāṭibī's Ethical Philosophy arose as a response to the urgent need for epistemological research on the hermeneutic foundations of Islamic ethical and moral theory that has resulted from the current period of upheaval in Islamic theology. Choosing a late-medieval work of legal theory, namely, Abū Isḥāq Ibrāhīm ibn Mūsā aš-Šāṭibī's (d. 790/1388) al-Muwāfaqāt, as the point of departure, locates this study's discussion methodologically and theoretically in the genealogical process of re-reading and reconstructing Islamic thinking in modernity from the perspectives of contemporary philosophy of ethics. Thus, profoundly reflecting on modern understanding and interpretation of fundamental theological concepts in the Islamic legal- and moral theory becomes unavoidable.
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Arab Christians and the Qurʾan from the Origins of Islam to the Medieval Period is a collection of essays on the use and interpretation of the Qur’an by Christians writing in Arabic in the period of Islamic rule in the Middle East up to the end of the thirteenth century. These essays originated in the seventh Woodbrooke-Mingana Symposium on Arab Christianity held in Birmingham, UK, in 2013, and are edited by Mark Beaumont.

Contributors are: David Bertaina, Sidney Griffith, Sandra Keating, Michael Kuhn, Juan Pedro Monferrer-Sala, Gordon Nickel, Emilio Platti and David Thomas