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Essays on Pockets, Pouches and Secret Drawers
Volume Editors: , , and
This essay collection focuses on enclosure, deception and secrecy in three spatial areas – the body, clothing and furniture. It contributes to the study of private life and explores the micro-history of hidden spaces. The contents of pockets may prove a surer index to their owner’s real thoughts than anything they say; a piece of furniture with ingenious mechanisms created to conceal secrets may also reveal someone’s attempts to break in and thus give away as much as it holds. Though the book’s focus is on particular material or imagined objects, taken as a whole it exemplifies a range of interdisciplinary encounters between history, literary criticism, art history, philosophy, psychoanalysis, sociology, criminology, archival studies, museology and curating, and women’s studies.
Editor:
This new book series investigates innovative ways to think about and design our built environment. The premise of Architectural Intelligences is that theories of design can generate innovative design methods and novel design projects. Architectural Intelligences seeks synthesis, hybridity, or tensions between architectural theory with other knowledge disciplines, to produce new insights, new speculations, and new design protocols. Architectural thought and production becomes thereby active and uniquely transformative. Books in this series will unfold new forms of order, organization, innovation, and experimentation that can shape and redirect current architectural thought, in dialogue with other disciplines, as game-changers.

Prospective authors in the disciplines of architecture, interiors, and urban spaces are encouraged to submit truly trans-disciplinary proposals (for single authored, co-authored, or edited volumes). Brill welcomes scholarly works that examine the area of applied architectural theory, drawing expertise in another knowledge discipline, such as:
• Architecture + Game Theory
• Architecture + Hypermodernity
• Architecture + New Ecologies
• Architecture + New Materiality
• Architecture + New Forms of Pleasure
• Architecture + Media-Philosophy
• Architecture + New Subjectivities
• Architecture + New Networks
• Architecture + Posthumanism

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
In Glorious Temples or Babylonic Whores, Anne-Françoise Morel offers an account of the intellectual and cultural history of places of worship in Stuart England. Official documents issued by the Church of England rarely addressed issues regarding the status, function, use, and design of churches; but consecration sermons turn time and again to the conditions and qualities befitting a place of worship in Post-Reformation England. Placing the church building directly in the midst of the heated discussions on the polity and ceremonies of the Church of England, this book recovers a vital lost area of architectural discourse. It demonstrates that the religious principles of church building were enhanced by, and contributed to, scientific developments in fields outside the realm of religion, such as epistemology, the theory of sense perception, aesthetics, rhetoric, antiquarianism, and architecture.
Time and Transformation in Architecture, edited by Tuuli Lähdesmäki, approaches architecture and the built environment from an interdisciplinary point of view by emphasizing in its theoretical discussions and empirical analysis the dimensions of time, temporality, and transformation—and their relation to human experiences, behavior, and practices. The volume consists of seven chapters that explore the following questions: How do architectural ideas, ideals, and meanings emerge, develop, and transform? How is architecture manifested in relation to time, time-space, and the social dimensions it entails and produces? The volume provides both multifaceted theoretical discussions on time and temporality in architecture and empirical case studies around the globe in which these theories and conceptualizations are tested and explored.

Contributors are Eiman Ahmed Elwidaa, André van Graan, June Jordaan, Joongsub Kim, Tuuli Lähdesmäki, Assumpta Nnaggenda-Musana, Sanja Rodeš and Smaranda Spânu.
Editor:
Intervening Spaces examines the interconnectedness between bodies, time and space - the oscillating and at times political impact that occurs when bodies and space engage in non-conventional ways. Bodies intervene with space, creating place. Likewise, space can reconceptualise notions of the subject-body. Such respatialisation does not occur in a temporal vacuum. The moment can be more significant than a millennia in producing new ways to see corporeal connections with space. Drawing on theorists as diverse as Foucault, Deleuze, Guattari, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Lefebvre and Grosz, temporal and spatial dichotomies are dissolved, disrupted and interrupted via interventions—revealing new ways of inhabiting space. The volume crosses disciplines contributing to the fields of Sociology, Literature, Performance Arts, Visual Arts, Architecture and Urban Design.

Contributors are Burcu Baykan, Pelin Dursun Çebi, Michelle Collins, Christobel Kelly, Anthi Kosma, Ana Carolina Lima e Ferreira, Katerina Mojanchevska, Clementine Monro, Katsuhiko Muramoto, Nycole Prowse, Shelley Smith, Nicolai Steinø and İklim Topaloğlu.
Volume Editors: , , and
Architecture and Control makes a collective critical intervention into the relationship between architecture, including virtual architectures, and practices of control since the turn of the twentieth to twenty-first centuries. Authors from the fields of architectural theory, literature, film and cultural studies come together here with visual artists to explore the contested sites at which, in the present day, attempts at gaining control give rise to architectures of control as well as the potential for architectures of resistance. Together, these contributions make clear how a variety of post-2000 architectures enable control to be established, all the while observing how certain architectures and infrastructures allow for alternative, progressive modes of control, and even modes of the unforeseen and the uncontrolled, to arise.

Contributors are: Pablo Bustinduy, Rafael Dernbach, Alexander R. Galloway, Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Maria Finn, Runa Johannessen, Natalie Koerner, Michael Krause, Samantha Martin-McAuliffe, Lorna Muir, Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen, Anne Elisabeth Sejten and Joey Whitfield
Author:
Phenomenology, Architecture and the Built World is an introduction to the methods and basic concepts of phenomenological philosophy through an analysis of the phenomenon of the built world. The conception of the built world that emerges is of space and time fashioned in accordance with a living understanding of what it is for human beings to exist in the world. Human building and making is thus no mere supplementary instrument in the pursuit of the ends of life, but a fundamental embodiment of the self-understanding of human beings. Phenomenological description is uniquely capable of bringing into view the physiognomy of this understanding, its texture and complexity, thereby providing an important basis for a critique of what constitutes its essence and its conditions of possibility.
The lives of William Cavendish, first duke of Newcastle, and his family including, centrally, his second wife, Margaret Cavendish, are intimately bound up with the overarching story of seventeenth-century England: the violently negotiated changes in structures of power that constituted the Civil Wars, and the ensuing Commonwealth and Restoration of the monarchy. William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle, and his Political, Social and Cultural Connections: Authority, Authorship and Aristocratic Identity in Seventeenth Century England brings together a series of interrelated essays that present William Cavendish, his family, household and connections as an aristocratic, royalist case study, relating the intellectual and political underpinnings and implications of their beliefs, actions and writings to wider cultural currents in England and mainland Europe.
In this paradigm shifting study, developed through close textual readings and sensitive analysis of artworks, Clare Lapraik Guest re-evaluates the central role of ornament in pre-modern art and literature. Moving from art and thought in antiquity to the Italian Renaissance, she examines the understandings of ornament arising from the Platonic, Aristotelian and Sophistic traditions, and the tensions which emerged from these varied meanings. The book views the Renaissance as a decisive point in the story of ornament, when its subsequent identification with style and historicism are established. It asserts ornament as a fundamental, not an accessory element in art and presents its restoration to theoretical dignity as essential to historical scholarship and aesthetic reflection.
This volume was first published by Inter-Disciplinary Press in 2013.

The search for a greater understanding of 'space' and 'place' inevitably involves an encounter with divergent approaches across a range of academic disciplines. Twenty authors from disciplines such as architecture, archeology, philosophy, social work, politics and the creative and visual arts have contributed papers to this compilation.