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Visual Data

Understanding and Applying Visual Data to Research in Education

Edited by Jon E. Pedersen and Kevin D. Finson

The visual inputs we receive can be collectively called visual data. Precisely how one defines visual data is a key question to ask. That is one of the questions we asked each author who wrote a chapter for this book. If one comes to a decision with respect to what visual data are, then the next question becomes, “What are visual data like?” Then, “What do they mean?” As with any data, we can collect it and compile it, but if we don’t have some way to bring meaning it, it has little value to us. The answers may not be as straightforward as one might assume at the outset.
The extent to which visual data permeates what we do as educators is such that it may be difficult to identify every discipline in which it emerges. In this book, we have tried to provide a forum for authors from a cross section of common disciplines: visual arts, English, literacy, mathematics, science, social science, and even higher education administration.

From microscope to kaleidoscope

reconsidering educational aspects related to children in the HIV&AIDS pandemic

Edited by Liesel Ebersöhn

What new understandings concerning children and significant others in their life-worlds have become apparent because of the HIV & AIDS pandemic? This innovative book argues that new insights on education and psychosocial aspects surface when research in the realm of HIV & AIDS is viewed through a positive psychology lens. By converging in-depth exploration and description, the book pinpoints vital persons supporting children’s wellbeing, and posits changed roles due to pandemic-related stressors. The significance of different education role-players (children, teachers, caregivers, community-members) is addressed in separate chapters, using pioneering theory and empirical data that are integrated with dynamic case examples, visual data and narratives. Ebersöhn’s edited book emphasises supportive persons and networks as buffers children access to mediate their coping when confronted by HIV & AIDS-related stressors. Throughout, the links between psychosocial support, changed roles and responsibilities, and resilience in the advent of adversity are clearly and thoughtfully demonstrated. A concluding chapter questions why and what happens to children’s wellbeing when society fails to provide supportive networks and services.

Jacques Lacan and Education

A Critical Introduction

Series:

Donyell L. Roseboro

This is an introductory level text with emphasis on Lacan’s theoretical relationship to education and which uses Lacan’s theories as a springboard for a different educational discourse, one that forces us to assess inward rather than outward. To move beyond the linear nature of schools, a context exacerbated by developmental psychologists like Piaget and Erikson who theorized that we can understand children’s development in stages, the author argues that Lacan’s theories allow us to holistically educate—to teach cognizant of the relationship between interior and exterior spaces, between the unspoken and the heard. The text serves four purposes: 1) to translate Lacan’s primary ideas into language appropriate for introductory level college students, 2) to examine identity in ways that are relevant across disciplines, 3) to re-frame Lacan’s work with post-structuralist and postmodern theories and, in so doing, create a distinctive analysis of the self predefined yet reinvented, and 4) to juxtapose Lacan’s work with post-formal thinking and theorize about his relevance to public education.
This book is purposefully organized with specific emphasis on Lacan’s work as a teacher and the ways in which his theories complicate current accountability standards in the United States which insist that “good” teaching and learning is quantifiable. The author foregrounds Lacan’s concepts of identity and language and analyzes those in parallel to the discourses of democratic education. Lacan’s theories do provide some indelible possibilities for public education in the twenty-first century. Considering his relevance to post-structuralism, post-formalism, post colonialism, and postmodernism, a Lacanian perspective of public education would defy the current standardization of curriculum in the wake of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) mandates. Using Lacan, the author re-envisions public education as a process which encourages the distinctiveness of students, challenges normative assumptions about what a “good” student is, and demands that teachers facilitate student understanding of multiple truths but that teachers also engage in an honest reconstruction of history—one that acknowledges the brutality of conquest, the arrogance of imperialism, and the illusiveness/elusiveness of peace.
Using the South African Truth and Reconciliation process as a framework, the author ends by constructing a model for public education which is grounded in “truth-telling” in public spaces, “witnessing” as a political practice, and educating as purposeful work. A Lacanian, post-formal curriculum, at its core, thus requires that we seek and identify truths, we work to become integrated beings by hearing the unconscious (that which we do not want to or cannot face), and that we educate for goodness and wholeness. This book is ultimately a call to re-envision the current public educational system in the U. S., a call to admit that it has inexcusably failed far too many children, and a call to construct entirely different possibilities.

Series:

Edited by Julia Resnik

"What impact does globalization have on the production of educational knowledge, and on the way scholars envisage education systems and education in general?
Western education systems are being transformed, and their role redefined, in light of the processes of globalization: education targets are being reshaped in response to global economic needs; education systems are rated according to international rankings and education itself has been packaged into a commodity that can be commercialized worldwide. In addition, globalization prompts more intimate contact with different types of societies, cultures and knowledge that defy our “universal” foundations and research tools. Has educational knowledge developed in a way that enables us to disentangle the new education configurations? In order to respond to this question this edited volume addresses four major challenges:
to understand the denationalization of education and the need to re-conceptualize this transformation.
to uncover the agents and the tools of educational globalization, such as the knowledge producers, international organizations and role of statistics.
to explore the implications of the emerging international educational institutions and international curricula.
to understand non-western education and integrating it into western educational knowledge.
These challenges are located at the core of the production of educational knowledge and are treated from a variety of viewpoints: sociological quantitative and qualitative scholarship, ethnographic accounts, socio-historical perspectives and philosophical reflections.
This book contributes to critical thinking about globalization and educational knowledge and, at the same time, opens our spirits to the theoretical opportunities and educational enrichment that the globalization era offers. This is a compelling collection for anthropologists, sociologists, educational researchers, and anyone who seeks to understand the need of new modes of thinking about education in the global era.
CONTRIBUTORS: Robert Arnove, Aaron Benavot, Eyal Ben Ari, Roser Cussó, Yossi Dahan, Roger Dale, Oren Lallo, Julia Lerner, Orna Naftali, Julia Resnik, Susan Robertson, Philip Wexler and Yossi Yonah.

Edited by Jaya Earnest, Margie Beck and Lorraine Connell

This book introduces and discusses a variety of educational and health issues and provides insights and glimpses into the broad political, economic and socio cultural contexts of education and health in Timor-Leste. Each chapter endeavours to provide detailed overviews of the context. The objective of the authors is to enable readers to have an understanding of the intricate, complex and synergistic connections amongst the underlying cultural, religious, economic and political arenas within the practices of health and education in the country.
Part I of the book deals with issues of educational change in the country, the authors of the five chapters on Education Rebuilding have lived in the country for extended periods of time and been involved as practitioners in the educational change process. Part II explores the complex issue of health, nutrition and services in the nation, the authors of the six chapters represent an eclectic mix of practitioners and researchers who have experienced first hand the health rebuilding process and have knowledge of the country, its communities and its people. In Part III the editors have attempted to use narrative so that non-academic voices are heard in relation to change. The final three chapters thus bring forth the “voices” of the contributors and people in the community.