Browse results

Series:

Ralf Koerrenz

Es gibt eine spezifisch hebräische Kultur der Bildung – das ist der Leitgedanke dieser Grundlegung. In dieser Kultur der Bildung spielt neben Aspekten wie Freiheit und Individualität ein bestimmtes Verständnis der Verantwortung des Menschen gegenüber sich selbst, der Mitwelt und der Umwelt eine entscheidende Rolle.
Dabei wird der Mensch als ein Wesen verstanden, das von der unaufhebbaren Gleichzeitigkeit von Entfremdung (Sünde) und Freiheit (als Befreiung) geprägt ist. Mit »hebräisch« wird dabei ein kultureller Überlieferungskontext bezeichnet, der sich in den Schriften der hebräischen Bibel gebündelt hat. Schöpfung und Sündenfall, Befreiung und prophetische Kulturkritik werden mit Blick auf das Bildungsmotiv anthropologisch ausgedeutet. Insgesamt entfaltet der Hebräische Humanismus nicht nur ein Verständnis von Kultur und Bildung, sondern kann insgesamt als eine bestimmte Ausprägung einer Kultur der Bildung verstanden werden. Der Hebräische Humanismus bildet die gemeinsame Grundlage für entsprechende Strömungen im Judentum, Christentum und Islam.

Series:

Edited by Ralf Koerrenz, Friederike von Horn and Friederike von Horn

The Lost Mirror traces cultural patterns in which the interpretation of learning and education was developed against the backdrop of Hebrew thought.

The appreciation of learning is deeply rooted in the Hebrew way of thinking. Learning is understood as an open and history-conscious engagement of man with culture. The consciousness of history is shaped by the motif of the unavailability of the “other” and the difference to this “other”. This “other” is traditionally remembered as “God”, but may also be reflected in the motifs of the other person or the other society. The Lost Mirror reminds us
of a deficit, which is that in our everyday thinking and everyday action, we usually hide, forget and partly suppress the meaning and presence of the unavailable other. The book approaches this thinking through portraits of people such as Hannah Arendt, Leo Baeck, Walter Benjamin, Agnes Heller, Emanuel Levinas, and others.

Reform(ing) Education

The Jena-Plan as a Concept for a Child-Centred School

Series:

Ralf Koerrenz

"School as counter-public" is the hermeneutic key with which Ralf Koerrenz interprets the school model of the Jena Plan. Similar to the Dalton-Plan or the Winnetka-Plan, the Jena Plan is one of the most important concepts of alternative schools developed in the first half of the 20th century as part of the international movement for alternative education, the “World Education Fellowship”. Peter Petersen's "Jena Plan" concept must be understood from his educational philosophical foundations. The didactic levels of action at school (teaching, learning) as well as the reflection of theory in pedagogical practice are made understandable by "school as a counter-public". Not least with a view to the today's Jena Plan schools, the question is asked for a context-independent core of what makes a school a Jena Plan school. The opportunities and ambivalences of the model thus become equally visible.

Clinical Partnerships in Urban Elementary School Settings

An Honest Celebration of the Messy Realities in the Preparation of Teachers

Series:

Edited by Mikkaka Overstreet and Lori Norton-Meier

In Clinical Partnerships in Urban Elementary School Settings, early career scholars describe their work in a clinical partnership model in one large urban district partnering with teachers, children, families, and administrators making a commitment to not only educate children but also the development of elementary teachers. Topics include community-university relationships, deconstructing privilege and oppression, responsive collaboration, professional identity, and the ways teacher candidates position young children.

The chapter authors are early career scholars who have participated in "community-engaged scholarship" at a Research-Extensive institution of higher education. They seek to illuminate the importance of this scholarship in order to grow the academic repertoires of emerging scholars in their ideologically becoming as well as connect and elevate the ways in which community engagement is valued and disseminated in publishing.

Readers of this text will: (1) read stories of teacher educators working through the "messy reality" of engaging in clinical teaching work; (2) gain insight to the complexity of the relationships with community, university, and schools and the individuals who seek to establish and/or nurture equitable learning environments for students; and (3) understand the power of qualitative research as a tool for telling stories about this messy work as well as discuss the necessity in valuing such efforts among higher education.

Contributors are: Tammy R. Davis, Tim Foster, Lateefah Id-Deen, Ann Larson, Bianca Nightengale-Lee, Shannon Putman, Gabrielle Read-Jasnoff, Amy Shearer Lingo, Anetria Swanson, and Emily Zuccaro.

Community Work and Adult Education in Staveley, North-East Derbyshire, 1969–1972

Retrospective Consideration, Selective Re-presentation, and Reflective Critique

Series:

Colin Kirkwood

In 1969, Colin Kirkwood took on the job of Area Principal for Adult Education in north-east Derbyshire. There he formed a remarkable creative partnership with Rob Hunter, a brilliant young Community Worker. This is the story of their collaboration and dialogue with the people of Staveley, a small coal, steel and chemicals town in the north-midlands of England. Together they created the local newspaper, Staveley Now, the Staveley Disabled Group, the Staveley Festival and much else. Community Work and Adult Education in Staveley, North-East Derbyshire celebrates this important collaboration by drawing on letters, interviews, poems, issues of the local newspaper and reports and articles written at the time. The research and critical assessment of their work together in the early 1970s can be linked with that of Paulo Freire in Latin America and throughout the world.

Engaging Learners with Semiotics

Lessons Learned from Reading the Signs

Ruth Gannon-Cook and Kathryn Ley

Semiotics has explained the cognitive mechanisms of a complex, subtle and important phenomenon affecting all human interactions and communications across socio-cultural, socio-economic groups. Semiotics has captured a durable and enriching functionality from multiple disciplines including psychology, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, marketing and their multidisciplinary off-spring, such as, educational psychology, consumer psychology, visual literacy, media studies, etc. Semiotic treatises have explored critical factors affecting the relationship between any intended message and the message recipient’s interpretation. The factors that shape interpretation inherently affect learning and often directly affect learner engagement with the content. Learning environments have been culturally-laden communication experiences which academics, largely segmented by discipline, have described but often cloaked in semiotic jargon.

Each chapter integrates example after example of semiotics in everyday activities and events, such as stories, graphics, movies, games, infographics, and educational strategies. The chapters also present the most salient semiotic features for learning environments. The book describes semiotics as a communications phenomenon with practical implications for educators to enhance courses and programs with semiotic features in any educational environment but especially in mediated e-learning environments.

Life-Practice Educology

A Contemporary Chinese Theory of Education

Series:

Lan Ye

In Life-Practice Educology: A Contemporary Chinese Theory of Education Ye Lan presents the theory of a contemporary Chinese school of Educology. It consists of two main parts. The first part proposes a fully formulated view on Life-Practice School of Educology and expounds on current thinking in China that denies the independence of educology as a discipline. The second part explains both inherited and new understandings of the Life-Practice School of Educology, covering Chinese traditional culture and the current debate. It further refines the Chinese understanding of Education (jiaoyu 教育) as teaching the knowledge of nature and society, and cultivating a self-conciousness towards life.

Toward Community-Based Learning

Experiences from the U.S.A., India, and China

Series:

Edited by Eija Kimonen and Raimo Nevalainen

Toward Community-Based Learning contends that the ideal school offers the opportunity to understand reality in a way that connects teaching and education with conditions in the surrounding community and the student’s life and concerns. This view holds that problem solving requires an understanding and awareness of the whole, which can be achieved through direct activities. In this manner, learning is linked to its natural context, with ideal instruction being actively problem-oriented, holistic, and life-centered.

This thought-provoking volume offers an essential and comprehensive picture of community-based learning in the field of education. The book deals with the history of community-based learning as well as its present applications, including its global successes and difficulties. The authors provide numerous pedagogical approaches that are designed to meet the challenges of contemporary education. They show how learning is connected with authentic community environments in which students can gain new understandings through solving emerging problems. They also demonstrate how teachers can make learning more functional and holistic so that students have the ability to work in new situations within the complex world around them. School-specific descriptions reveal how teachers and their students have implemented community-based projects in the U.S.A., India, and China at different times.

Contributors are: Thomas L. Alsbury, Mary Ewans, Linda Hargreaves, Susan K. Johnsen, Eija Kimonen, Susan Kobashigawa, Karon N. LeCompte, Suzanne M. Nesmith, Raimo Nevalainen, and Lakia M. Scott.
This series consists of books written for all stakeholders in education including undergraduate and graduate students of education, teachers, parents, and the community at large. The volumes bridge research, theory, personal anecdotes and practice, and interrogates and provides recommendations for schools and communities, specifically in urban spaces. This series focuses on privileging the authentic voices of those who have a vested interest in urban education and urban schools, as well as introduce critical pedagogical ways to engage communities and schools. Educators, students, community members, and academics are given opportunities to understand the essential nature of voice and activism. This work is necessary to transform schools and communities to better represent the young people they were built to serve.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by e-mail to Assistant Editor Evelien van der Veer.

Deterritorializing Language, Teaching, Learning, and Research

Deleuzo-Guattarian Perspectives on Second Language Education

Series:

Edited by Francis Bangou, Monica Waterhouse and Douglas Fleming

It is now recognized that language teachers and learners are both users and creators of knowledge in socially, culturally, politically, materially complex, and unpredictable environments. With this in mind, an increasing number of researchers in Second Language Education have progressively broken away from traditional ways of studying educational practices to find novel, and more complex ways to conceptualize and study language teachers’ and learners’ teaching and learning practices and knowledge development.

This book is in line with these trends, and should be considered as the actualization of experimentations with novel ways to apprehend the interrelationships between language and education by drawing on the conceptual repertoire of French philosopher Gilles Deleuze and his collaborator Félix Guattari. To guide us through this reflexive journey ten scholars, specialized in the field of Second Language Education, call on their experiences as language educators and researchers to explore the intersections between language, teaching, learning, and research, focusing on the experiences of diverse populations (e.g. students, immigrants, teachers, etc.) in multiple settings (e.g. Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, universities, and family literacy intervention programs).

Through this book, new insights and lines of thought are generated on how research and educative practices can be transformed to reimagine second language teaching, learning, and research to think differently about the experiences of language teachers, learners, and researchers, and disrupt the processes that may prevent us from innovating and seizing future opportunities.

Contributors are: Francis Bangou, Maria Bastien-Valenca, Joff P. N. Bradley, Martina Emke, Douglas Fleming, Roumiana Ilieva, Brian Morgan, Enrica Piccardo, Aisha Ravindran, Gene Vasilopoulos and Monica Waterhouse.