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Author: Paulina Komar
Eastern Wines on Western Tables: Consumption, Trade and Economy in Ancient Italy is an interdisciplinary and multifaceted study concerning wine commerce and the Roman economy during Classical antiquity. Wine was one of the main consumption goods in the Mediterranean during antiquity, and the average Roman adult male probably consumed between 0,5 - 1 litre of it per day. It is therefore clear that the production and trading of wine was essential for the Roman economy. This book demonstrates that wines from the Eastern Mediterranean and the Aegean region in particular, played a crucial part in wine commerce. Moreover, it sheds new light on economic dilemmas that have long puzzled scholars, such as growth and market integration during antiquity.
Libertas and Res Publica in the Roman Republic offers some essential ideas for an understanding of Roman politics during the Republican period by analysing two key concepts: libertas (liberty) and res publica (public matter, republic). Exploring these concepts through a variety of different aspects – legal, religious, literary, political, and cultural – this book aims to explain the profound relationship between the two. Through the examination of a rich array of sources ranging from classical authors to coins, from legal texts to works of art, Balmaceda and her co-authors propose new readings that elucidate the complex meanings and inter-related functions of libertas and res publica, in a thought-provoking, deep, but very readable study of Roman political culture and identity.
Volume Editors: Nicole Belayche and Francesco Massa
Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity aims to fill a gap in the study of mystery cults in Graeco-Roman Antiquity by focusing on images for investigating their ritual praxis. Nicole Belayche and Francesco Massa have gathered experts on visual language in order to illuminate cultic rituals renowned for both their “mysteries” and their images. This book tackles three interrelated questions. Focusing on the cult of Dionysus, it analyses whether, and how, images are used to depict mystery cults. The relationship between historiography and images of mystery cults is considered with a focus on the Mithraic and Isiac cults. Finally, turning to the cults of Dionysus and the Mother of the Gods, this work shows how depictions of specific cultic objects succeed in expressing mystery cults.
In Israel in Egypt scholars in different fields explore what can be known of the experiences of the many and varied Jewish communities in Egypt, from biblical sources to the medieval world. For generations of Jews from antiquity to the medieval period, the land of Egypt represented both a place of danger to their communal religious identity and also a haven with opportunities for prosperity and growth. A volume of collected essays from scholars in fields ranging from biblical studies and classics to papyrology and archaeology, Israel in Egypt explores what can be known of the experiences of the many and varied Jewish communities in Egypt, from biblical sources to the medieval world.
In People and Institutions in the Roman Empire colleagues honor Garrett Fagan for his contributions to our understanding and appreciation of Roman history and culture. In addition to reviewing and contextualizing Fagan’s works and legacy, contributing authors pursue in their chapters topics and methodologies that interested Fagan - the experiences of individuals within Roman state and social institutions from the end of the Republic through the Empire and into Late Antiquity.
Part One contextualizes Fagan’s scholarship, demonstrating the diversity of his interests and his impact. Part Two considers the intersection between people and core state institutions: army, law, and religion. Part Three examines Roman social and cultural institutions such as the baths, arena, historiography, and provincial elite society.
SGG 3 explores intriguing and challenging fields of ancient Greek philology in its early stages. It deals with the remnants of scholarship performed by anonymous pre-Aristarchean interpreters of Homeric glosses, collectively mentioned in ancient sources as the Glossographers (οἱ Γλωσσογράφοι; introductory essay, critical edition, Italian translation and commentary by Emanuele Dettori), as well as with the fragments of the pioneering textual examination (diorthōsis) conducted by the scholar poet Lycophron of Chalcis on the plays of Attic comedy in the early 3rd century BC Alexandria (introduction, critical edition, Italian translation and commentary by Andrea Pellettieri).
Three millennia of cross-Mediterranean bonds are revealed by the 18 expert summaries in this book—from the dawn of the Bronze Age to the budding of Hellenization. An international team of acclaimed specialists in their fields—archaeologists, historians, geomorphologists, and metallurgists—shed light on a plethora of aspects associated with travelling this age-old sea and its periphery: environmental factors; the formation of harbors; gateways; commodities; the crucial role of metals; cultural impact; and the way to interpret the agents such as Canaanites, "Sea Peoples," Phoenicians, and pirates. The book will engage any student of the Old World in the 3000 years before the Common Era.
Brill’s Companion to Euripides offers 49 specially commissioned essays from leading international scholars which give critical examinations of the progress and direction of numerous wide-ranging debates about various aspects of Euripidean drama. Each chapter, as well as covering a wide diversity of thematic angles, provides readers with an authoritative and state-of-the-art survey of current thinking and research in a particular subject area. Recent advances in scholarship have raised new questions about Euripides and Attic drama, and have overturned some long-standing assumptions and canons. Besides presenting a comprehensive and authoritative guide to understanding Euripides and his masterworks, this companion provides scholars and students with compelling fresh perspectives upon a broad range of issues in the rapidly evolving field of Euripidean studies.
In The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus Thomas R. Henderson provides a new history of the Athenian ephebeia, a system of military, athletic, and moral instruction for new Athenian citizens. Characterized as a system of hoplite training with roots in ancient initiation rituals, the institution appears here as a later Lykourgan creation with the aim of reinvigorating Athenian civic culture. This book also presents a re-evaluation of the Hellenistic phase of the ephebeia, which has been commonly regarded as an institution in decline. Utilizing new epigraphic material, the author demonstrates that, in addition to rigorous military training, the ephebeia remained an important institution and played a vital and vibrant part of Athenian civic life.
Author: Justin Allison
In Saving One Another: Philodemus and Paul on Moral Formation in Community Justin Reid Allison compares how the Epicurean philosopher Philodemus and the Christian apostle Paul envisioned the members of their communities helping one another to grow into moral maturity. Allison establishes that Philodemus and Paul are more similar than previously noticed in their conception and practice of moral formation in community, and that these similarities offer a critical opportunity to consider important differences between the two as well. By deepening the comparison to include differences alongside similarities, and to include theological and socio-economic facets of communal moral formation, Allison shows that Philodemus and Paul uniquely shed fresh light on one another’s texts when understood in comparative perspective.