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Editors: Liu Xiaonan and Wang Liwan
In Equality and Anti-Discrimination: The Road to Equal Rights in China, Professors Liu Xiaonan and Wang Liwan collect experienced scholars in the field of anti-discrimination law to conduct deep discussions on the manifestations, causes, and solutions of discrimination issues in China. Since the reform and opening up in China, the government has loosened its governance, and the market economy and civil society have developed. However, many economic and social discriminations have also emerged and caused widespread social contradictions and legal dilemmas. In this book, equality rights and discrimination issues are investigated in a panoramic way from the perspective of law, and .insightful suggestions are made.
The authors believe that anti-discrimination research and actions in the field of Chinese law are carried out simultaneously with political changes and economic development. In this process, experts and scholars, public media, research institutions, and non-governmental organizations play important roles. The awakening of civil rights awareness and the emergence of rights protection actions for vulnerable groups are the sources of anti-discrimination research and actions in the field of law.
The Law of International Humanitarian Relief in Non-international Armed Conflicts comprehensively covers the entire scope of conflicting rights and duties of the fighting parties and international humanitarian relief actors in non-international armed conflicts, namely from the moment of the initiation of international humanitarian relief actions till their authorisation and throughout the consecutive stages of the delivery of relief. From the practice of frontline humanitarian negotiations, this book reconceptualizes how those rights and duties are coming into being and how compliance with agreements on humanitarian access and other international humanitarian law and international human rights norms can be ensured and/or their normativity can be strengthened.
This book offers a culture-by-culture account of various unique restrictions placed on warfare over time, in a bid to demonstrate the underlying humanity often accompanying the horrors of war. It offers the first systematic exploration of Indigenous Australian laws of war, relaying decades of experience in communities. Containing essays by a range of laws of war academics and practitioners, this volume is a starting point in a new debate on the question: how international is international humanitarian law?
Article 5 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child
This book arises out of a CRC Implementation Project colloquium on Article 5 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Article 5 protects the responsibilities, rights and duties of parents or others to provide, in a manner consistent with the evolving capacities of the child, appropriate direction and guidance in the exercise by the child of his/her rights. In this interdisciplinary collection, leading international scholars address the interplay of parental guidance, state responsibility and child autonomy within a wide range of fields, from gender identity to criminal justice. The chapters provide fascinating insights into the vital but enigmatic role of Article 5.
Author: Carol Chi Ngang
In The Right to Development in Africa, Carol Chi Ngang provides a conceptual analysis of the human right to development with a decolonial critique of the requirement to have recourse to development cooperation as a mechanism for its realisation. In his argumentation, the setbacks to development in Africa are not necessarily caused by the absence of development assistance but principally as a result of the lack of an operational model to steer the processes for development towards the highest attainable standard of living for the peoples of Africa. Basing on the decolonial and capability theories, he posits for a shift in development thinking from dependence on development assistance to an alternative model suited to Africa, which he defines as the right to development governance.
This is a collection of international law materials relating to the Philippines: excerpts of treaties and declarations; international judicial and arbitral decisions; and Philippine constitutional clauses, statutes and Supreme Court decisions.

Today new theories abound, calling for comparative perspectives that look at International Law through the lens of national and regional practice. This book engages that challenge at a concrete level, e.g., how the Marcos human rights abuses were litigated abroad but never in Philippine courts, and how victim claims for reparations are, ironically, blocked by the Philippine Government citing the Filipino people’s competing claims over Marcoses' ill-gotten wealth. It retells Philippine history using international law, and re-examines international law using the Philippine experience.
This volume offers original research on religious freedom from around the globe. Individual chapters address the issues related to defining and understanding the concept of religious freedom and incorporate sociological thinking into interdisciplinary analysis of this topic. By interpreting legal cases, analyzing cross-national data, interviewing policy-makers, and reviewing policy-papers concerning religious freedom, the authors highlight the necessity of sociology engaging with other disciplines in this type of research. By applying theories of religious pluralism, secularity, secularization, judicialization of religion, “lived religion”, total institutions, and others, this volume contributes theoretical perspectives, sociological concepts and empirical analyses that highlight the development of religious freedom as an area of study in the social sciences.
The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law aims to publish peer-reviewed scholarly articles and reviews as well as significant developments in human rights and humanitarian law. It examines international human rights and humanitarian law with a global reach, though its particular focus is on the Asian region.

The focused theme of Volume 5 is Law, Culture and Human Rights in Asia and the Middle East.
This book focuses on trend-setting judgements in different parts of the world that impacted on the rights of individuals belonging to minorities and indigenous people. The cases illustrate how the judiciary has been called upon to fill out the detail of minority protection arrangements and how, in doing so, in many instances the judiciary has taken the respective countries on a course that parliament may not have been able to navigate. In this book authors from various nationalities and backgrounds in the practical application of minority protection arrangements investigate the role of the judiciary in constitutional arrangements aimed at the protection of the rights of minorities and indigenous peoples.
Why do churches assist people without authorized residence even when the state prohibits and punishes such conduct? What does it mean for church-state relations when the church steps into the shoes (or perhaps on the feet) of the government? And are all levels of government on the same page when it comes to migration? These are just some of the questions that this book addresses.
In a world in which migration is an omnipresent reality, these issues pervade national borders, ethnic divides, and physical barriers. These issues are shared among all nations and peoples of this world, and deserve utmost attention as geopolitical contours continue to evolve.