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2. Jhd. v. Chr. - 3. Jhd. n. Chr.
Die vorliegende Monographie entwirft eine literaturgeschichtliche Gesamtdarstellung des römischen Antiquarianismus vom 2. Jahrhundert v. Chr. bis zum 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr. Ausgangspunkt ist die begrifflich-konzeptuelle Neuprofilierung des Phänomens. Dieses wird als ein epistemologisches Modell gegenwartsbezogener Vergangenheitsanalyse aufgefasst, die mit den Denkfiguren der Etymologie, Aitiologie und Genealogie operiert, um die hinter der erfahrbaren Lebenswelt liegenden Kausalitäten freizulegen. Anhand der überlieferten Fragmente und Testimonien wird die Entwicklung der heute verlorenen antiquarischen Fachliteratur Roms in ihren unterschiedlichen medialen Formaten, Darstellungsformen und Wirkungskontexten nachgezeichnet.
This volume provides an account of Roman antiquarianism from the 2nd century BC to the 3rd century AD, reconstructing its textual manifestations and analysing the mechanisms of transmission. It is based on a new conceptualisation of antiquarianism as an epistemological mode of understanding the present by uncovering its origins in the past. Etymology, aitiology and genealogy were the tools used to explore the causalities that underpin the perceptible world. Antiquarianism, represented by a wide range of texts and genres throughout antiquity, is traced as an autonomous branch of literature. Fragments and testimonies are used to identify a lost corpus of treatises, lexica and handbooks that formed the scholarly basis of Augustan poets, historiographers and imperial litterateurs.    
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In the treatise On the Change of Names (part of his magnum opus, the Allegorical Commentary), Philo of Alexandria brings his figurative exegesis of the Abraham cycle to its fruition. Taking a cue from Platonist interpreters of Homer’s Odyssey, Philo reads Moses’s story of Abraham as an account of the soul’s progress and perfection. Responding to contemporary critics, who mocked Genesis 17 as uninspired, Philo finds instead a hidden philosophical reflection on the ineffability of the transcendent God, the transformation of souls which recognize their mortal nothingness, the possibility of human faith enabled by peerless faithfulness of God, and the fruit of moral perfection: joy divine, prefigured in the birth of Isaac.
This book represents the first monograph (miscellany) entirely devoted to Crantor of Soli (app. 335–275 BCE), an outstanding figure of the Old Academy. He was in particular famous for his On Grief, an exemplary work of consolation literature, and for his being the first commentator of Plato’s Timaeus. Unlike his darling Arcesilaus of Pitane, who initiated the Sceptical turn, Crantor seems to have stuck firm to the Academic teachings of Polemon and Plato. The contributions collected in this book aim to convey a complete picture of Crantor by discussing various aspects of his philosophy and biography.