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Volume Editors: Laura Baranzini and Louis de Saussure
If there’s a domain in linguistics which complexity calls for ever further research, it’s clearly that of tense, aspect, modality and evidentiality, often referred to as ‘TAME’. The reason for which these domains of investigation have been connected so tightly as to deserve a common label is that their actual intertwining is so dense that one can hardly measure their effects purely individually, without regard to the other notions of the spectrum. On the other hand, despite their imbrications, tense, aspect, modality and evidentiality remain – needless to say – separate theoretical entities. The papers gathered in this volume cover a range of issues and a variety of methods that help delineate, each in its way, new perspectives on this broad domain.
Volume Editors: Laura Baranzini and Louis de Saussure
Si le temps occupe une place aussi centrale dans la discussion linguistique, et depuis si longtemps, c’est parce que ce sujet – avec ses sujets-frères que sont l’aspect, la modalité et l’évidentialité – est non seulement riche et complexe mais aussi profondément enraciné dans la langue, se manifestant à tous ses niveaux et dans une quantité importante de contextes de réflexion.
Les articles recueillis dans ce volume se présentent à premier abord comme des études spécifiques sur des phénomènes précis, mais il s’avère rapidement que, de par sa nature, le sujet ‘temps’ ne peut pas être abordé de manière « isolée », puisqu'il parcourt la langue comme un système étendu, sans qu’on puisse en dessiner les limites avec clarté.

The reason why tense has occupied such a central place in linguistic discussion, and has done so for so long, is that this topic - along with its related topics aspect, modality and evidentiality - is not only rich and complex but also deeply rooted in language, manifesting itself at all its levels and in a significant number of contexts. The contributions collected in this volume appear at first sight as specific studies of specific phenomena, but it soon becomes clear that, by its very nature, the subject of 'time' cannot be approached in 'isolation', since it runs through the language as a pervasive system, without its boundaries being clearly defined.
Editor: Jeanne Garane
Since 1974, the French Literature Series publishes essays in conjunction with the theme of the bi-annual French Literature Conference, sponsored by the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures of the University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA. In addition to the scholarly papers selected for publication by the Editorial Board, it also accepts notes on the conference topic. Contributors should note that FLS does not publish conference proceedings. Rather, submissions must be revised for publication and undergo blind peer review.
All communications concerning the French Literature Series should be addressed to the Editor, Jeanne Garane, garanej@mailbox.sc.edu
The French Literature Series is published by BRILL | Rodopi. For communications concerning standing orders or back volumes, please check the series’ website at www.brill.com/fls
Studies in Practical Linguistics
For more than two decades following the "Chomskyan revolution" in the late fifties the emphasis in linguistics was almost exclusively on theoretical issues. The turbulent growth, over the past fifteen years or so, of computer science and in its wake the rise of language technology has led to a renewed interest in practical applications of linguistic theory. Word-processing, text-comprehension, dialogue systems, expert systems, (semi-)automatic translation, speech recognition and speech synthesis are all areas in which insights derived from linguistics are playing an increasingly important role. These new insights have been gained from corpus linguistics, work on automatic syntactic analysis, machine readable dictionaries etc.
The Language and Computers series aims to function as a platform for original and stimulating work in this wide and varied field. The essential ingredients characterizing the volumes in the series are already apparent from its title: As studies in linguistics they have, by definition, their foundations in linguistic theory; however, they are not concerned with theory for theory's sake, but always with a definite direct or indirect interest in the possibilities of practical application in this dynamic area where language and computers meet.
Studies in Digital Linguistics
The new-media revolution has led to a comprehensive digitization of our textual universe and the pervasive incorporation of the media into our everyday lives (from mobile telephony to social media). This calls for a concerted research effort uniting linguistics and other disciplines involved in language-related research. The massive growth in the amount, diversity and availability of textual and multimodal language data for many of the world’s languages poses several challenges. In terms of theory and methods, it forces us to rethink traditional notions of what linguistic corpora are and what role they play in linguistic description. Established corpus-linguistic methods such as concordancing and textual statistics are increasingly being complemented by visualization and geolocation of digital language data. Empirically, there is a growing need to document and analyse what people do with language in the increasingly technologized communicative ecology of the 21st century.

Language and Computers - Studies in Digital Linguistics invites contributions which
- explore innovative, intelligent and creative ways of using digital language data, resources and infrastructure for linguistic description
- contribute to the development and refinement of usage-based models in linguistics, using both quantitative and qualitative methods
- analyse all aspects of digitally mediated communication, from orthography to pragmatics and sociolinguistics
Temporal and Geographical Dynamics of Theorization
Volume Editors: Luc van Doorslaer and Ton Naaijkens
In The Situatedness of Translation Studies, Luc van Doorslaer and Ton Naaijkens critically reassess some outdated views about Translation Studies, and demonstrate that translation theory is far more diverse than its usual representation as a Western scholarly tradition arising from the 1970s onwards. They present ten chapters about lesser-known conceptualizations of translation and translation theory in various cultural contexts, such as Chinese, Estonian, Greek, Russian and Ukrainian. This book shows that so-called ‘modern’ arguments about translation practice encompassing much more than a linguistic phenomenon, can, in fact, be dated back and connected to several precursors, such as semiotics or transfer theory. In doing so, it theorizes and localizes discussions about perceptions of translation and Translation Studies as a discipline.

Contributors: Yves Gambier, Iryna Odrekhivska, Elin Sütiste & Silvi Salupere, Shaul Levin, Feng Cui, Natalia Kamovnikova, Anastasia Shakhova, George Floros & Simos Grammenidis, Anne Lange, Luc van Doorslaer & Ton Naaijkens.
The chapters collected in the volume Passives Cross-Linguistically provide analyses of passive constructions across different languages and populations from the interface perspectives between syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. The contributions are, in principle, all based on the background of generative grammatical theory. In addition to the theoretical contributions of the first part of this volume, all solidly built on rich empirical bases, some experimental works are presented, which explore passives from a psycholinguistic perspective based on theoretical insights. The languages/language families covered in the contributions include South Asian languages (Odia/Indo-Aryan and Telugu/Dravidian, but also Kharia/Austro-Asiatic), Japanese, Arabic, English, German, Modern Greek, and several modern Romance varieties (Catalan, Romanian, and especially southern Italian dialects) as well as Vedic Sanskrit and Ancient Greek.
A text usually provides more information than a random sequence of clauses: It combines sentence-level information to larger units which are glued together by coherence relations that may induce a hierarchical discourse structure. Since linguists have begun to investigate texts as more complex units of linguistic communication, it has been controversially discussed what the appropriate level of analysis of discourse structure ought to be and what the criteria to identify (minimal) discourse units are. Linguistic structure–and more precisely, the extraction and integration of syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic information–is shown to be at the center of text processing and discourse comprehension. However, its role in the establishment of basic building blocks for a coherent discourse is still a subject of debate. This collection addresses these issues using various methodological approaches. It presents current results in theoretical, diachronic, experimental as well as computational research on structuring information in discourse.
These lectures deal with the role of cognitive modelling in language-based meaning construction. To make meaning people use a small set of principles which they apply to different types of conceptual characterizations. This yields predictable meaning effects, which, when stably associated with specific grammatical patterns, result in constructions or fixed form-meaning parings. This means that constructional meaning can be described on the basis of the same principles that people use to make inferences. This way of looking at pragmatics and grammar through cognition allows us to relate a broad range of pragmatic and grammatical phenomena, among them argument-structure characterizations, implicational, illocutionary, and discourse structure, and such figures of speech as metaphor, metonymy, hyperbole, and irony.
Multilingualism and Ageing provides an overview of research on a large range of topics relating to language processing and language use from a life-span perspective. It is unique in covering and combining psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic approaches, discussing questions such as: Is it beneficial to speak more than one language when growing old? How are languages processed in multilingual persons, and how does this change over time? What happens to language and communication in multilingual aphasia or dementia? How is multilingual ageing portrayed in the media?
Multilingualism and Ageing is a joint, cross-disciplinary venture of researchers from the Centre for Multilingualism in Society across the Lifespan at The University of Oslo and the editors of this publication.