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Edited by James E. Ketelaar, Yasunori Kojima and Peter Nosco

The chapters in this volume variously challenge a number of long-standing assumptions regarding eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Japanese society, and especially that society’s values, structure and hierarchy; the practical limits of state authority; and the emergence of individual and collective identity. By interrogating the concept of equality on both sides of the 1868 divide, the volume extends this discussion beyond the late-Tokugawa period into the early-Meiji and even into the present. An Epilogue examines some of the historiographical issues that form a background to this enquiry. Taken together, the chapters offer answers and perspectives that are highly original and should prove stimulating to all those interested in early modern Japanese cultural, intellectual, and social history
Contributors include: Daniel Botsman, W. Puck Brecher, Gideon Fujiwara, Eiko Ikegami, Jun’ichi Isomae, James E. Ketelaar, Yasunori Kojima, Peter Nosco, Naoki Sakai, Gregory Smits, M. William Steele, and Anne Walthall.

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David Quinter

In From Outcasts to Emperors, David Quinter illuminates the Shingon Ritsu movement founded by the charismatic monk Eison (1201–90) at Saidaiji in Nara, Japan. The book’s focus on Eison and his disciples’ involvement in the cult of Mañjuśrī Bodhisattva reveals their innovative synthesis of Shingon esotericism, Buddhist discipline (Ritsu; Sk. vinaya), icon and temple construction, and social welfare activities as the cult embraced a spectrum of supporters, from outcasts to warrior and imperial rulers. In so doing, the book redresses typical portrayals of “Kamakura Buddhism” that cast Eison and other Nara Buddhist leaders merely as conservative reformers, rather than creative innovators, amid the dynamic religious and social changes of medieval Japan.

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Zhu Weizheng

Edited by Michael Dillon

Rereading Modern Chinese History is a collection of short essays on aspects of the history of the Qing dynasty, a regime dominated by Manchus that ruled China from 1644 to 1911. Using sources from that period and earlier it addresses key themes on the nature of Qing rule. These include the defeat by the British in the Opium Wars, the twin-track administration of Manchus and Han Chinese, the rise of Chinese military leaders in southern China, the purchase of office and endemic corruption, the challenge of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom, and the failure of political reform. There are new insights on all the Qing emperors and the Empress Dowager Cixi, who ruled China between 1861 and 1908.

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Edited by Jane Kate Leonard and Ulrich Theobald

Money in Asia examines two chronic problems that faced early modern monetary economies in East, South, and Southeast Asia: The inability to provide sufficient amounts of small currencies to facilitate local economic transactions and to control currency depreciation. The studies in this volume analyze the social and economic consequences of small currency scarcity and devaluation on various Asian economies and show how various regimes tried to manage these ever-present challenges. They reveal that those regimes that dealt most successfully with these two issues were those with an integrated national approach to monetary policy.
Contributors are: Peter Bernholz, Werner Burger, Cao Jin, Mark Elvin, Dennis O. Flynn, Roger Greatrex, Najaf Haider, Reinier H. Hesselink, Elisabeth Kaske, Man-houng Lin, Jane Kate Leonard, Christine Moll-Murata, Keiko Nagase-Reimer, Shan Kunqin, Shimada Ryūto, Ulrich Theobald, Hans Ulrich Vogel, and Willem Wolters

Antiquarianism, Language, and Medical Philology

From Early Modern to Modern Sino-Japanese Medical Discourses

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Edited by Benjamin A. Elman

Based on several research seminars, the authors in this volume provide fresh perspectives of the intellectual and cultural history of East Asian medicine, 1550-1800. They use new sources, make new connections, and re-examine old assumptions, thereby interrogating whether and why European medical modernity is an appropriate standard for delineating the modern fate of East Asia’s medical classics. The unique importance of early modern Europe in the history of modern medicine should not be used to gloss over the equally unique and thus different developments in East Asia. Each paper offers an important contribution to understanding the dynamics of East Asian medicine, namely, the relationship between medical texts, medical practice, and practitioner identity. Furthermore, the essays in this volume are especially valuable for directing our attention to the movement of medical texts between different polities and cultures of early modern East Asia, especially China and Japan. Of particular interest are the interactions, similarities, and differences between medical thinkers across East Asia,
Contributors include: Susan Burns, Benjamin A. Elman, Asaf Goldschmidt, Angela KC Leung, Federico Marcon, MAYANAGI Makoto, Fabien Simonis, Daniel Trambaiolo, and Mathias Vigouroux.


New Perspectives on Yenching University, 1916-1952

A Liberal Education for a New China

Edited by Arthur Lewis Rosenbaum

Essays in New Perspectives on Yenching University, 1916·1952 reevaluate the experience of China's preeminent Christian university in an era of nationalism and revolution. Although the university was denounced by the Chinese Communists and critics as an elitist and imperialist enterprise irrelevant to China's real needs, the essays demonstrate that Yenching's emphasis on biculturalism, cultural exchange, and a broad liberal education combined with professional expertise ultimately are compatible with nation-building and a modern Chinese identity. They show that the university fostered transnational exchanges of knowledge, changed the lives of students and faculty, and responded to the pressures of nationalism, war, and revolution. Topics include efforts to make Christianity relevant to China's needs; promotion of professional expertise, gender relationships and coeducation; the liberal arts; Sino-American cultural interactions; and Yenching's ambiguous response to Chinese nationalism, Japanese invasion, and revolution.

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Edited by Benjamin A. Elman

The authors consider new views of the classical versus vernacular dichotomy that are especially central to the new historiography of China and East Asian languages. Based on recent debates initiated by Sheldon Pollock’s findings for South Asia, we examine alternative frameworks for understanding East Asian languages between 1000 and 1919. Using new sources, making new connections, and re-examining old assumptions, we have asked whether and why East and SE Asian languages (e.g., Chinese, Manchu, Mongolian, Jurchen, Korean, Japanese, and Vietnamese) should be analysed in light of a Eurocentric dichotomy of Latin versus vernaculars. This discussion has encouraged us to explore whether European modernity is an appropriate standard at all for East Asia. Individually and collectively, we have sought to establish linkages between societies without making a priori assumptions about the countries’ internal structures or the genealogy of their connections.
Contributors include: Benjamin Elman; Peter Kornicki; John Phan; Wei Shang; Haruo Shirane; Mårten Söderblom Saarela; Daniel Trambaiolo; Atsuko Ueda; Sixiang Wang.



Broken Narratives

Post-Cold War History and Identity in Europe and East Asia

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Edited by Susanne Weigelin-Schwiedrzik

The end of the Cold War reshuffled the power relations between former friends and enemies. In Broken Narratives the contributors offer an account of the consequences of the end of the Cold War for the (re-)telling of history in film, literature and academic historiography in Europe and East Asia. Despite the post-modern claim that there is no need for a master-narrative, the contributions to this book show that we are in the middle of an intense and difficult search for a common understanding of the past. However, instead of common narratives polyphony and dissonances are produced which reflect a world in a period of transition. As the contributions to this volume show, the year 1989 has generated broken narratives.
Contributors include: Peter Verstraten, Rotem Kowner, Susanne Weigelin-Schwiedrzik, Carsten Schäfer, Martin Gieselmann, Yonson Ahn, Chang Lung-chih, Andrea Riemenschnitter, Shingo Minamizuka, Petra Buchholz, and Tatiana Zhurzhenko.

Edited by Peter O'Connor

Western Journalists on Japan, China and Greater East Asia, 1897-1956, planned as a collection in four series of 10-volume sets, offers a significant primary source of journalistic memoir and journalism relating to East Asia, Japan's brief empire in South-East Asia, civil war and communist unification in China and the Cold War in East Asia over a period of six decades. With a Foreword by Waseda University’s Tsuchiya Reiko and a General Introduction by Series Editor Peter O’Connor, each Series contextualises dispatches to Western newspapers and highlights on-the-spot reports and memoirs from Anglophone Western and Asian journalists based in East and South-East Asia and writing for locally-published English-language newspapers. Series 2: Pioneering Women Journalists, 1919-1949 comprises 16 full-length volumes (c.4100 pages), opening with Ellen La Motte’s Peking Dust (1919) and concluding with Anna Louise Strong’s The Chinese Conquer China (1949).

Nogami Yaeko

Nogami Yaeko's novel The Labyrinth deals with the doubts and dilemmas of leftwing intellectuals before and during World War II. Rich in social detail and profound in its psychology, it follows the political and sentimental evolution of the protagonist Kanno Shōzō from a humiliating recantation of his socialist creed to a problematic participation in Japan's war against China. Nogami Yaeko (1885-1985) was Japan's longest-lived woman writer and has an assured place in the history of Japanese fiction. Winner of the prestigious Nomiuri prize, The Labyrinth was immediately recognized as a major critical contribution to the understanding of Japanese political and intellectual history.