Browse results

Edited by Ann-Marie Cook and Teresa Sofia Castro

Series:

Edited by Emiko Ochiai and Leo Aoi Hosoya

This volume, the first major study in its field, offers an invaluable stepping-stone to a more informed understanding of the fundamental social changes taking place in Asia – defined as ‘a reconstruction of the intimate and public spheres’. Such changes are being observed worldwide, but previous studies relating to this phenomenon are largely based on Western experiences dating back to the 1970s. Developments in Asia, however, are manifesting both similarities and differences between the two regions.

The book’s strongest appeal, therefore, lies in its theoretical orientation, seeking to define frameworks that are most relevant to the Asian reality. These frameworks include compressed and semi-compressed modernity, familialism, familialization policy, unsustainable society, the second demographic dividend, care diamonds, and the transnational public sphere. Such concepts are seen as essential in any discussion concerning the intimate and public spheres of contemporary Asia. Accordingly, Transformation of the Intimate and the Public in Asian Modernity can be seen as a valuable text as well as a work of reference and will be welcomed by social scientists and cultural anthropologists alike.

The book comprises an in-depth introduction and ten chapters contributed by scholars from Japan, Korea, Thailand and Canada covering topics ranging from low fertility, changing life course, increasing non-regular employment, care provision, migrant workers, social policies, and family law, to the activities of transnational NGOs, with a special focus on distinctive features of Asian experiences.

Social Structures of Direct Democracy

On the Political Economy of Equality

Series:

John Asimakopoulos

Neoliberalism has pushed capitalism to its limits, hollowing out global economies and lives in the process, while people have no voice. John Asimakopoulos addresses the problem with a theory to practice model that reconciles Marxism, with its diverse radical currents, and democratic theory. Social Structures of Direct Democracy develops a political economy of structural equality in large-scale society making strong empirical arguments for radical transformation. Key concepts include filling positions of political and economic authority (e.g., legislatures and corporate boards) with randomly selected citizens leaving the demos as the executive. Asimakopoulos shows that an egalitarian society leads to greater innovation, sustainable economic growth, and positive social benefits in contrast to economies based on individualism, competition, and inequality.

Coordination in Transition

The Netherlands and the World Economy, 1950–2010

Series:

Jeroen (L.J.) Touwen

This book analyzes the evolution of the institutional structure of the Dutch political economy since 1950. It sketches in broad strokes the origin and economic role of coordination in the Netherlands. The Dutch economy is compared with other OECD countries by using the ‘varieties of capitalism’ theory and distinguishing between coordinated and liberal market economies. The author focuses on the constant adaptation of deliberative institutions in the business system, in labor relations, and in welfare policy.
The complex institutional setting did not prevent the economy from participating in the globalization of markets and capital that took place since ca. 1980. The book is located at the intersection of two quite different literatures: modern economic history and the political science literature on ‘varieties of capitalism’.

Series:

Tine Destrooper

In Come Hell or High Water: Feminism and the Legacy of Armed Conflict in Central America, Tine Destrooper analyzes the political projects of feminist activists in light of their experience as former revolutionaries. She compares the Guatemalan and Nicaraguan experience to underline the importance of ethnicity for women’s activism during and after the civil conflict.
The first part of the book traces the influence of armed conflict on contemporary women’s activism, by combining an analysis of women’s personal histories with an analysis of structural and contextual factors. This critical analysis forms the basis of the second part of the book, which discusses several alternative forms of women’s activism rooted in indigenous practices
The book thereby combines a micro- and macro-level analysis to present a sound understanding of post-conflict women’s activism.

Higher Education in the UK and the US

Converging University Models in a Global Academic World?

Series:

Edited by Sarah Pickard

Higher Education in the UK and the US: Converging University Models in a Global Academic World? edited by Sarah Pickard addresses the key similarities and differences in higher education between the two countries over the last thirty years, in order to ascertain whether there exists a specific ‘Anglo-Saxon model’. This interdisciplinary book is divided into three thematic parts dealing with current fundamental issues in higher education within neoliberal Great Britain and the United States: economics and marketisation of higher education; access and admittance to universities; and the student experience of higher education. The contributors are all higher education specialists in diverse academic fields – sociology, political sciences, public policy studies, educational studies and history – from either side of the Atlantic.

Contributors are: Bahram Bekhradnia, James Côté, Marie-Agnès Détourbe, John Halsey, Magali Julian, Kenneth O’Brien, Cristiana Olcese, Anna Mountford-Zimdars, Sarah Pickard, Chris Rust, Clare Saunders, Christine Soulas, and Steven Ward.
Series Editors: Vincenzo Cicchelli and Sylvie Octobre

Specialists of adolescence and youth tend to consider these life stages as valuable barometers of social change. Indeed, new trends in society can be observed through the prism of young people who today find themselves under the spotlight as never before. At the same time, all over the planet, tremendous changes in everyday life can be witnessed currently. The main reason for a book series focused on adolescence and youth from an international perspective is due to the lack of knowledge and understanding of the emergence of transnational shared practices, values, norms, behaviors, cultures and patterns among young people all over the globe.

The aim of this book series is to be a forum for discussion and exchanges, a space for intellectual creativity on all questions relating to youth in a globalizing world. It also provides a valuable and much-needed crucible for comparative studies on youth from an international perspective. Its spirit is to be open to new suggestions coming from research in the social sciences. From an epistemological stance, what kind of concepts do sociologists of youth need in order to understand changes? Are classical sociological concepts on youth still useful and relevant? What kind of perspectives could be more suitable?

Because this book series is situated within a mainstream research framework, we welcome original leading works written in a manner that is accessible to a wider audience.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the series editors Vincenzo Cicchelli and Sylvie Octobre.

Submissions of an interdisciplinary nature are strongly encouraged.

Special proposal criteria
All proposals must include the following. If a proposal lacks any of these elements, it will be returned.
1) Table of contents
2) Prospectus
3) One-page summary of each chapter
4) Working bibliography

Travelling Models in African Conflict Management

Translating Technologies of Social Ordering

Series:

Edited by Andrea Behrends, Sung-Joon Park and Richard Rottenburg

Travelling Models offers a theoretical concept for comparative research on conflict management in Africa in processes of globalization: how is change in one place related to developments in other places? Why are certain issues that are important in one place taken up in other places, while others are not? The authors examine how the travel of models enact changes, particularly in African conflict situations, most often in unexpected ways. They look at what happens when a model has been put into practice at a conflict site, and they pay attention to the forms of social (re-)ordering resulting from this process. The authors look, among others, at conflict managing models of power- and revenue sharing, mediation, freedom of expression, disaster management, community involvement and workshopping.

Contributors are: Andrea Behrends, Lydie Cabane, Veronika Fuest, Dejene Gemechu, Mutasim Bashir Ali Hadi, Remadji Hoinathy, Mario Krämer, Sung-Joon Park, Tinashe Pfigu, Richard Rottenburg, Sylvanus Spencer and Kees van der Waal.

The Introduction of this volume is being offered in Open Access

Series:

Tobias Ten Brink

In Global Political Economy and the Modern State System Tobias ten Brink contributes to an understanding of the modern state system, its conflicts, and its transformation. In contrast to the political attractiveness of optimistic theoretical approaches to globalisation, this book demonstrates how an analytical approach rooted in Global Political Economy (GPE) helps to explain both the tendencies towards integration and towards rivalry in international relations. By way of a historical reconstruction of different ‘world order’ phases in the twentieth century, ten Brink analyses multiple, phase-specific variations of socioeconomic and geopolitical conflicts that are significant for the modern capitalist world system.

Revised edition of Geopolitik. Geschichte und Gegenwart kapitalistischer Staatenkonkurrenz, Verlag Westfälisches Dampfboot, Münster, 2008.

The Favor of Friends

Intercession and Aristocratic Politics in Carolingian and Ottonian Europe

Series:

Sean J. Gilsdorf

The Favor of Friends offers the first book-length exploration of intercession—aid and advocacy by one individual or group in behalf of another—within early medieval aristocratic societies. Drawing upon a variety of disciplines and historiographical traditions, Sean Gilsdorf demonstrates how this process operated, and how it was ideologically elaborated, in Carolingian and Ottonian Europe, allowing individuals and groups to leverage their own, limited interpersonal networks to the fullest, produce new relationships, gain access to previously closed spaces, and generate interest in their agendas from those able to effect change. The Favor of Friends enriches our understanding of early medieval politics and rulership, offering a model of political interaction in which hierarchy and comity do not stand in ideological and pragmatic tension, but instead work in integrated and mutually-reinforcing ways.