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Author: Mingjun Lu
In The Metaphysics of Chinese Moral Principles, author Mingjun Lu seeks to construct and establish the metaphysics of Chinese morals as a formal and independent branch of learning by abstracting and systemizing the universal principles presupposed by the primal virtues and key imperatives in Daoist and Confucian ethics. Lu proposes that the metaphysical foundation of Chinese moral principles, as reinstated in this book, brings to light not only the universality of its core values and ideals but also a pivotal though hitherto neglected key to the enduring vibrancy of a civilization that has lasted several millennia.
Mill’s Principle of Utility: Origins, Proof, and Implications is a defense of John Stuart Mill’s utilitarianism with a particular emphasis on his proof of the principle of utility. Supplemented by a comprehensive historical background as well as salient philosophical assumptions and implications, its primary contribution is an analysis, interpretation, and defense of the controversial proof, which has yet to attract a scholarly consensus on how it works and whether it succeeds. The overarching aim of the book is the vindication of Mill’s reasoning in the proof and the restoration of his reputation as one of the clearest thinkers of his time.
Anthropology, Epistemology, Ethics, Space
Volume Editors: Asis De and Alessandro Vescovi
An Indian Bengali by birth, Amitav Ghosh has established himself as a major voice in what is often called world literature, addressing issues such as the post-colonial and neo-colonial predicaments, the plight of the subalterns, the origin of globalisation and capitalism, and lately ecology and migration. The volume is therefore divided according to the four domains that lie at the heart of Ghosh’s writing practice: anthropology, epistemology, ethics and space. In this volume, a number of scholars from all over the world have come together to shed new light on the works and poetics of Amitav Ghosh according to the epistemic frameworks that form the bedrock of his fiction.

Contributors: Safoora Arbab, Carlotta Beretta, Lucio De Capitani, Asis De, Lenka Filipova, Letizia Garofalo, Swapna Gopinath, Evelyne Hanquart-Turner, Sabine Lauret-Taft, Carol Leon, Kuldeep Mathur, Fiona Moolla, Sambit Panigrahi, Madhsumita Pati, Murari Prasad, Luca Raimondi, Pabitra Kumar Rana, Ilaria Rigoli, Sneharika Roy, John Thieme, Alessandro Vescovi.
Volume Editor: Paul Avis
John Neville Figgis, CR (1866-1919) was a brilliant Anglican theologian, historian, political thinker and preacher; he was also a monk. This volume of a dozen freshly commissioned essays by eminent scholars retrieves, expounds and critiques his thought and relates it to the culturally pluralist theological, ethical and political situation in which we find ourselves in the twenty-first century. Although Figgis’ significance is widely acknowledged by scholars, little has been written about him. Figgis has an uncontested place in Anglican and Episcopal thought and is overdue for a concerted study of the many facets of his work and importance.
In Nicholas of Cusa on the Trinitarian Structure of the Innate Criterion of Truth, Paula Pico Estrada offers an analysis of Nicholas of Cusa’s (1401-1464) unitrine conception of the human power of judgment, arguing that the innate criterion that guides human beings to their end is formed by a cognitive, an affective and a social dimension, and that it not only makes possible the systematization and evaluation of cognitive experience but also enables morality.
Based on a close reading of Cusanus’ philosophical treatises, the study deepens our understanding of Nicholas of Cusa’s epistemology, showing that his anthropological conception integrates philosophy and theology.
Author: Andrea Branchi
In Pride, Manners, and Morals: Bernard Mandeville’s Anatomy of Honour Andrea Branchi offers a reading of the Anglo-Dutch physician and thinker’s philosophical project from the hitherto neglected perspective of his lifelong interest in the theme of honour. Through an examination of Mandeville’s anatomy of early eighteenth-century beliefs, practices and manners in terms of motivating passions, the book traces the development of his thought on human nature and the origin of sociability.

By making honour and its roots in the desire for recognition the central thread of Mandeville’s theory of society, Andrea Branchi offers a unified reading of his work and highlights his relevance as a thinker far beyond the moral problem of commercial societies, opening up new perspectives in Mandeville’s studies.