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The Greek Revolution of 1821 and the Formation of Modern Greece
Author:
In theorising on the causes, preconditions, dynamics and internal conflicts of the Greek Revolution of 1821, the analysis of Milios tackles the issue of bourgeois revolutions in general. Additionally, his investigation of the historical emergence and the limits of the Greek nation, calls forth the broader theoretical and historical question of the economic, political, and ideological presuppositions of nation-building. The book illustrates how nationalism brings the masses to the political forefront, which the capitalist state then incorporates into its apparatuses as ‘sovereign people’. Nationalism being enmeshed within the political element, consists the basis upon which irredentism develops, recruiting populations into the expansionist-imperialist strategies of the ruling classes.
The Plurality of Historical Worlds From Epicurus to Modern Science
Author:
By digging through the stratigraphy of the history of ideas we can find within and beyond Marxism an ‘aleatory current’ that values the role of chance in history. Using this perspective, the book builds a case for a historical materialism that is stripped of all teleology. Starting in the ancient Mediterranean with Epicurus, it traces the history of conceiving history as plural up to Marxism and modern science. It shows that concrete historical ‘worlds’ such as ancient Mesoamerica and Eurasia cannot be reduced to a single template. Affirming the potentiality of a future non-capitalist ‘world’, it invalidates any ‘end of history’ thesis.
Imagining Latinidad examines how Latin American migrants use technology for public engagement, social activism, and to build digital, diasporic communities. Thanks to platforms like Facebook and YouTube, immigrants from Latin America can stay in contact with the culture they left behind. Members of these groups share information related to their homeland through discussions of food, music, celebrations, and other cultural elements. Despite their physical distance, these diasporic virtual communities are not far removed from the struggles in their homelands, and migrant activists play a central role in shaping politics both in their home country and in their host country.

Contributors are: Amanda Arrais, Karla Castillo Villapudua, David S. Dalton, Jason H. Dormady, Carmen Gabriela Febles, Álvaro González Alba, Yunuen Ysela Mandujano-Salazar, Anna Marta Marini, Diana Denisse Merchant Ley, Covadonga Lamar Prieto, María del Pilar Ramírez Gröbli, David Ramírez Plascencia, Jessica Retis, Nancy Rios-Contreras, and Patria Román-Velázquez.
The New Economics (Theory and Practice): 1922-1928
Evgeny A. Preobrazhensky was Russia’s foremost economist in the 1920s. This volume editorially reconstructs his theory of socialist industrialisation in an agrarian country and relates it to previous socialist theories and to issues of political struggle, culture and communist morality. The editors create a unique portrait of Preobrazhensky as an economist and social theorist, assess the viability of NEP as a model of economic growth, and identify the fault lines that contributed to the split in the Trotskyist Opposition and its defeat in the struggle against Stalin. The bulk of the work consists of the important An Attempt to Provide a Theoretical Analysis of the Soviet Economy, while the material in Volume III focuses on concrete analysis.
Evgeny A. Preobrazhensky was Russia’s foremost economist in the 1920s. This volume editorially reconstructs his theory of socialist industrialisation in an agrarian country and relates it to previous socialist theories and to issues of political struggle, culture and communist morality. The bulk of the work consists of Preobrazhensky’s Concrete Analysis of the Soviet Economy, which supplements his theoretical inquiry published in Volume II. A number of appendices present Preobrazhensky’s analysis of the NEP and his correspondence with Trotsky alongside extensive contributions by the volume’s editors and translators.
This book discusses five cases of hatred politics on the margins of global capital: Turkey under Erdogan (assumed office in 2003), Hungary under Orbán (assumed office in 2010), India under Modi (assumed office in 2014); the Philippines under Duterte (assumed office in 2016) and Brazil under Bolsonaro (assumed office in 2019). How did they come to power? What strategies of legitimation do they employ? What resistances do they face? Country case studies lay the foundation for a systematic comparison that illuminates the key dynamics of this novel political form. Analyses of their responses to the Covid-19 pandemic further shed light on their methods in a time of crisis and a chapter that considers the Trump presidency indicates how we can understand these leaderships given their pronounced counterpart in the Global North – and vice-versa. This is not a mere collection of texts commissioned from specialists, but the result of a two-year-long collective endeavor: an international taskforce to respond to a global phenomenon.

Contributors are: Fabio Luis Barbosa dos Santos, Daniel Feldmann, Ágnes Gagyi, Daniel Geary, Tamás Gerőcs, Sefika Kumral, Cecilia Lero, Devika Misra, Ilhan Can Ozen and Aparna Sundar.
Series Editor:
Studies in Political Economy of Global Labor and Work is a peer-reviewed book series that explores the historical development and transformation of workers’ organizations, trade unions, and class conflict in the broader context of the changing global capitalist political economy. The series also investigates how workers are responding to the proliferation of neo-liberal ideas and institutions that are resistant to labor organizing and social democracy. Thus, the series welcomes volumes on global movements related to changes in the work process, industrial restructuring, labor law, migration and immigration, financialization, imperialism and workers’ struggles, as well as autonomism and syndicalism, insurrections, general strikes, and other responses to globalizing capitalism that shape labor movements.

Studies in Political Economy of Global Labor and Work examines the character of work in the contemporary world while paying particular attention to the effects of economic restructuring, immigration, and anti-labor political forces on the capacity of unions and the labor movement to represent, defend, and empower workers. The series also examines how political institutions, businesses, and labor organizations in the Global North and South have shaped worker power on the job and in society. The premise of this series is the well-established and broadly acknowledged assessment that worker power has drastically declined as multinational capitalist corporations and international institutions forge neo-liberal economic policies and that the erosion of worker power more broadly erodes social democracy as corporate interests gain greater control over economic and political power. The volumes in the series examine contemporary labor in the world through an array of lenses from across the social sciences, including gender, class, race, sexuality, religion, language, and nationality.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs and edited collections.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Athina Dimitriou.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.

Please take a moment to visit the related Journal of Labor and Society

Comparative Studies in Governance
This series makes available scholarship that helps us to understand the changing balances between centres of power and the territories under their domination. It takes as a starting point the notion that domination is frequently achieved through conquest and coercion, but is rarely maintained exclusively by such means. The empires as well as the composite states of the pre-modern world always depended to some extent on the integration and cooperation of regional elites. The relationship between rulers and elites took shape in the centre as well as in the regions. At the heart of the dynastic state, rulers found themselves surrounded by a variety of state servants, ranging from personal attendants to advisers, priests, administrators and soldiers. How were such staffs recruited, and how did rulers attempt to secure their lasting loyalty? In addition to the social and institutional intricacies of the ruler’s environment, we invite studies about the architectural and cultural make-up, comparing the layout of palaces, rules for access, and the ritual, artistic, as well as scholarly forms underpinning dynastic legitimacy. Going from the centre to the regions, how did armies, administrators, church and religion, law and justice operate? Were such institutions and practices strongly centralized and filled with rulers’ nominees, or closer to regional elites in personnel and mentality? Was the culture of regional elites oriented strongly towards the standards of the centre? Which forms of contact and representation evolved? To what extent, finally, did the population participate in the practices and rituals of rulership?
These themes and questions offer a framework for comparison which this series will pursue, ideally by publishing work that is in itself comparative, but also by publishing studies focusing on a single region while fitting into the general framework. An initial focus on the early modern Eurasian world leaves open extensions in time and space relevant for the theme.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/ or full manuscripts to either the series editor, Jeroen Duindam, or the publisher, Arjan van Dijk at Brill, P.O. Box 9000, 2300 PA Leiden, The Netherlands.
Series Editors: and
Will the twenty-first century be the Asian century? Will the People’s Republic of China (PRC) overtake the United States as the leading global superpower? Will an institutionalised Third Bloc emerge in international relations and challenge the transatlantic alliance that has dominated world politics for such a long time? While opinions on the details differ strongly, there seems to be a certain consensus that the East Asian region, roughly defined as Northeast Asia (Greater China, the two Koreas, Japan and the Russian Far East) plus Southeast Asia (the ten members states of ASEAN), will be globally significant in the years to come and see its role growing. Such a role includes almost all fields such as economics, science and technology, migration, culture, and international relations. These issues are interrelated and often overlap.

This series, therefore, takes as its main focus the field of international relations post-WWII that pertain to the region and in particular the question of collective security and related issues, including options for institutionalised mechanisms of a joint regional security policy. The need for such a focus has become increasingly obvious: shifts in the global balance of power, as well as a multitude of conflicts in the region, some old and unresolved, some new and emerging, actual or potential, call for ongoing detailed appraisal and sustainable solutions.

The Structural Inequities of Capitalism, from Lehman Brothers to Covid-19
In Crisis, Inequalities and Poverty, Schettino and Clementi provide an empirical and theoretical analysis of the economic breakdown that has characterised the last two decades of capitalist development – from the Lehman collapse to the Covid-19 pandemic – with a particular focus on the impact on poverty and inequality. The book provides a materialist account of the current global crisis of overproduction and looks at the link between capitalist crisis and systemic inequity, making the case through detailed quantification that the principal engine of these structural phenomena is in fact the general law of accumulation of the capitalist mode of production.