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This first and only English translation of Rong Xinjiang’s The Silk Road and Cultural Exchanges Between East and West is a collection of 28 papers on the history of the Silk Road and the interactions among the peoples and cultures of East and Central Asia, including the so-called Western Regions in modern-day Xinjiang. Each paper is a masterly study that combines information obtained from historical records with excavated materials, such as manuscripts, inscriptions and artefacts. The new materials primarily come from north-western China, including sites in the regions of Dunhuang, Turfan, Kucha, and Khotan. The book contains a wealth of original insights into nearly every aspect of the complex history of this region.
The Exchange of Ideas and Political Collaborations between China's Men of Guns and Men of Letters, 1919-1923
This book offers the first comprehensive study of the ways in which China’s men of guns (so-called “warlords”) and men of letters (May Fourth intellectuals) engaged one another for the making of a Chinese federation between 1919 and 1923. Breaking the constructed dichotomy between the men of guns and men of letters, Vivienne Guo’s analysis reappraises Chinese warlordism against the backdrop of the Chinese enlightenment. Exploring the ideological underpinnings and political vigour of the Chinese federalist movement, Negotiating A Chinese Federation provides a fresh interpretation of China’s cultural renewal and state-building.
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Beyond Citizenship focuses on the role of literacy in building a modern nation-state by examining the government provision of adult literacy training in early twentieth-century China. Based on untapped archives and diaries, Di Luo uncovers people’s strategic use of literacy and illiteracy in social interactions and explores the impact of daily experiences on the expansion of state power. Highlighting interpersonal and intergroup relations, Beyond Citizenship suggests a new methodology of studying literacy which foregrounds the agentive role of historical actors and so moves away from a more traditional approach that treats literacy itself as the key factor enabling social change.
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How have the historical experiences and legacies of the communist revolution before 1949 and socialism under Mao influenced the course of reform and development in China since the 1980s? And how do Chinese intellectuals reexamine the aspects and trajectories of socialism and reform in China and reinterpret the links and discontinuities between them? The Rethinking Socialism and Reform in China series presents the most innovative studies in English translation by leading Chinese scholars, which have been originally published by Open Times (Kaifang shidai), one of the most influential journals in China that appeals to both academics and the general public. The planned volumes of the series cover a variety of themes ranging from the communist revolution, social control and mobilization, and everyday power relations in Maoist China, to economic change, governance and resistance, gender, ethnicity, and cultural issues in recent decades.
In the past decades, the world has watched the rise of China as an economic and military power and the emergence of Chinese transnational elites. What may seem like an entirely new phenomenon marks the revival of a trend initiated at the end of the Qing. The redistribution of power, wealth and knowledge among the newly formed elites matured during the Republican period.
This volume demonstrates both the difficulty and the value of re-thinking the elites in modern China. It establishes that the study of the dynamic tensions within the elite and among elite groups in this epochal era is within reach if we are prepared to embrace forms of historical inquiry that integrate the abundant and even limitless historical resources, and to engage with the rich repertoire of digital techniques/instruments available and question our previous research paradigms.
This renewed approach brings historical research closer to an integrative data-rich history of modern China.
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Commissioned by the Qianlong emperor in 1751, the Qing Imperial Illustrations of Tributary Peoples (Huang Qing zhigong tu 皇清職貢圖), is a captivating work of art and an ideological statement of universal rule best understood as a cultural cartography of empire. This translation of the ethnographic texts accompanied by a full-color reproduction of Xie Sui’s (謝遂) hand-painted scroll helps us to understand the conceptualization of imperial tributary relationships the work embodies as rooted in both dynastic history and the specifics of Qing rule.
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In this book, Xiong Yuezhi and a team of distinguished scholars bring together cutting-edge research on the urban history of Shanghai and the diversity of its distinctive culture. Occupying an interstitial space between Chinese and foreign power, Shanghai from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century experienced almost unimaginably complex developments in its political, social, economic, and cultural history. To untangle this complexity, Xiong and his team have carefully constructed, in thematic and chronological fashion, the interactions between the imperialist powers, foreign settlers, and the Chinese community of Shanghai from the origins of the racially-segregated International Settlement in the 1840s to the internment of foreign settlers in Shanghai during World War II in the 1940s.
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In this volume Guo Yongqin provides an overview of the most important taxes, land and labor tax, in Imperial Qing China (1644-1912). The previously unpublished fiscal sources presented in this volume give a tremendous amount of information about Qing society and economy, like the bureaucratic system, political institutions, economic inequality, and environmental conditions. The data is accompanied by a detailed introduction, offering a valuable resource for further research on how the standardized tax system performed and affected the Qing regime.
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How did people solve their disputes over debt, compensation, inheritance and other civil matters in early China? Did they go to court? How did the authorities view those problems? Using recently excavated early Chinese legal materials, Zhang Zhaoyang makes the compelling argument that civil law was not only developed, but also acquired a certain degree of sophistication during the Qin and Han dynasties. The state promulgated detailed regulations to deal with economic and personal relationships between individuals. The authorities formed an integral part of the formal justice system, and heard civil cases on a regular basis.
Chinese Policies and the Ethnic Turn in Inner Mongolian Politics, 1900-1930
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How did inter-ethnic solidarity become attenuated in the era of the Chinese imperial transformation (1900-1930)? Based on Inner Mongolian cases, this book examines the transformations effective in the policy domains of land affairs, military organization, and law, which were initiated to strengthen state centralization, yet resulted in the sharpening of ethnic boundaries.
Using unpublished archival sources, this book benefits from three key strengths. It addresses the question of Mongol-Han relationship in the early Republican period (1911-1930), it illuminates the details of imperial administration and its changes along with the shift of the regime, and it explores the theoretical potentials of the near frontier approach and positions the Chinese imperial transition within a comparative perspective.