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Edited by Council of Europe/Conseil de l'Europe

The Yearbook of the European Convention on Human Rights, edited by the Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal Affairs, is an indispensable record of the development and impact of the world’s oldest binding international human rights treaty.
It reviews the implementation of the Convention both by the European Court of Human Rights and by the Council of Europe’s Committee of Ministers, responsible for supervising the application of the Court’s judgments in the member states.

The Yearbook includes:
Full text of any new protocols to the Convention as they are opened for signature, together with the state of signatures and ratifications.
Full listing of Court judgments; judgments broken down by subject-matter; and extensive summaries of key judgments handed down by the Court during the year.
Selected human rights (DH) resolutions adopted as part of the Committee of Ministers’ work supervising the execution of the Court’s judgments.
Enquiries by the Secretary General carried out under Article 52 of the Convention.
Other work of the Council of Europe connected with the European Convention on Human Rights, carried out by the Committee of Ministers, the Parliamentary Assembly, and the Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal Affairs.
Bibliographic information from the library of the European Court of Human Rights.
The Yearbook is published in an English-French bilingual edition.

Coexistence, Cooperation and Solidarity (2 vols.)

Liber Amicorum Rüdiger Wolfrum

Edited by Holger P. Hestermeyer, Doris König, Nele Matz-Lück, Volker Röben, Anja Seibert-Fohr, Peter-Tobias Stoll and Silja Vöneky

This Liber Amicorum, dedicated to Judge Rüdiger Wolfrum of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, highlights paradigmatic changes in international law, a body of law which moved during the 20th century from a law of coexistence to one of cooperation and which is now about to reflect notions of solidarity going even beyond cooperative undertakings. This leitmotif of Rüdiger Wolfrum’s academic research and judgeship is represented in a comprehensive collection of essays by eminent scholars and practitioners of international law covering specific aspects of international law, including law of the sea, human rights, international environmental law, international dispute settlement, peace and security, global governance and domestic law. With its multifaceted and comprehensive overview of the evolution of international law in recent years and detailed study of current challenges this collection is a unique source of insight for all those interested in this fascinating field of law.

Edited by Alan Gladstone, Benjamin Aaron, Tore Sigeman, Jean-Maurice Verdier, Lord Wedderburn of Charlton, Manfred Weiss and Zvi H. Bar-Niv

The International Labour Law Reports is a series of annual publications of labour law judgements by the highest courts in a number of jurisdictions. ILLR is intended primarily for the use of judges, labour law practitioners, industrial relations specialists and students who need or desire ready access to authoritative information of a comparative nature on problems arising in the field of labour law and industrial relations.
Each judgement reprinted in ILLR is accompanied by Headnotes and in practically all cases by an Annotation which sets forth, among other things, the legal issues involved, the basic facts of the case (if not included in the judgement itself), the relevant statutory provisions and judicial precedents, the labour law and industrial relations context in which the case arose and the significance of the judgement in the development of the law. As a rule, judgements are printed in extenso; editorial discretion has been relied upon to delete or to summarize portions of judgements that are purely technical or only of marginal interest.
Volume 22 covers the period 1 October 2001 to 30 September 2002.

The African Charter of Human and Peoples' Rights

A Comprehensive Agenda for Human Dignity and Sustainable Democracy in Africa

Fatsah Ouguergouz

This work reveals the true dimension of the African Charter through a systematic analysis of its real or apparent innovations and a detailed assessment of the commitments of the States parties. It also analyzes the effectiveness of the mechanism put in place to monitor compliance with those commitments, examining the practice of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights from its establishment in 1987. It incorporates major recent achievements in the field of the protection of human rights in Africa, including the creation of the African Court of Human and Peoples’ Rights and the establishment of the African Union.
This work is the expanded and updated English version of La Charte africaine des droits de l’homme et des peuples – Une approche juridique des droits de l’homme entre tradition et modernité (Presses Universitaires de France, Paris).

Rights and Duties of Dual Nationals

Evolution and Prospects

Edited by David A. Martin and Kay Hailbronner

The increased emergence of dual and multiple nationality in our globalized world has recently led to public and scholarly debates on a number of resulting practical questions. This book comprehensively evaluates the legal status of dual nationals on the basis of a comparative analysis, with emphasis on practice and law in the United States of America, the Federal Republic of Germany, Turkey and other selected countries, comprising contributions of both academics and practitioners. Among the legal subjects examined more intensively are the exercise of political rights by dual nationals, including voting and office holding, performance of military service, loss and withdrawal of citizenship, and effects of dual nationality on judicial cooperation, as well as aspects of private international law. The authors pay attention to developmental trends and legal changes in various countries, and also to the philosophical and theoretical perspectives underlying various practices. Specific recommendations for states dealing with dual nationality complete the investigation.

The UN Human Rights Treaty System

Universality at the Crossroads

Anne Bayefsky

Human rights treaties are at the core of the international system for the promotion and protection of human rights. Every UN member state has ratified at least one of these treaties, making them applicable to virtually every child, woman or man in the world - over six billion people. At the same time, human rights violations are rampant. The problem is that the implementation scheme accompanying the core human rights standards was drafted during a period of history when effective international monitoring was neither intended nor achievable.
Today there is a gap between universal right and remedy that is inescapable and inexcusable, threatening the integrity of the international human rights legal regime. There are overwhelming numbers of overdue reports, untenable backlogs, minimal individual complaints from vast numbers of potential victims, and widespread refusal of states to provide remedies when violations of individual rights are found.
This landmark Report prepared by Professor Bayefsky envisions a wide-ranging number of reforms, most of which can be accomplished without formal amendment. The recommendations generally assume a six treaty body regime, and focus primarily on offering concrete suggestions for improvements in working methods of the treaty bodies and procedures at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Professor Bayefsky details numerous proposals for bolstering national level partnerships, and for following-up the output of the treaty monitoring system as a key missing component of the implementation regime. One major reform requiring amendment is ultimately recommended, namely, consolidation of the human rights treaty bodies and the creation of two permanent committees, one for the consideration of state reports and one for complaints.
All individuals, agencies, and organizations involved in the promotion, implementation, review, analysis, and study of human rights protection for all peoples will find this Report an indispensable resource for their work. It contains a unique overview of all the working methods of the six human rights treaty bodies, a detailed and thorough statistical analysis of the operation of the human rights treaty system, and a number of additional annexes which together provide a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the treaty system.
The international human rights legal system is at a crossroads, with the ideal of universality threatened by the fundamental shortfalls in effective implementation. This Report offers a clear and substantive path to moving universality beyond rhetoric and towards a treaty regime meaningful and effective in the lives of everyday people.

Chris Ingelse

Edited by Inter-American Commission on Human Right and Inter-American Court of Human Rights/La

This volume of the Inter-American Yearbook on Human Rights covers the year 1998, and contains all the documents and information (in English and Spanish) concerning the activities of the Organization of American States in the field of the promotion and protection of human rights.
Like its predecessors, this Yearbook aims to contribute to a greater awareness of the functions and activities of the organs of the Inter-American system for the protection of human rights.

Karin Arts

Human rights, democracy and governance concerns are prominent elements in the development cooperation policy of the European Community. The relations between the European Community (EC) and 71 developing countries in Africa, the Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) have proved to be a laboratory for developing ideas on these matters, for translating them into binding treaty norms, and for applying them in practice. The experiences gained in the ACP-EC relationship carry special value because they are the product of dialogue and joint decision-making between groups of developed and developing states. Therefore, 25 years of ACP-EC cooperation under the Lomé Convention provide a rich learning ground for anybody involved or interested in (the debate on) linking development cooperation to human rights and to human rights related concerns.
This book explores the international law aspects of the subject. It first investigates the general international legal basis for linking development cooperation to human rights, democracy and good governance. Both the negative and positive ways of making such a linking (by punitive and supportive measures) are addressed. The book then delves into the evolution of Lomé treaty norms on the subject, and into the concrete human rights practices that took shape under them. It explores the contributions to and influence of both the EC and ACP states on those treaty provisions and practices. A comprehensive overview is provided of the support measures and sanctions resorted to in response to the human rights situation in ACP countries. The book assesses the overall experiences gained and presents a synthesis of factors that proved to be constraints or conducive to the efforts to integrate human rights fully into ACP-EC development cooperation. The insights gained could well inform similar efforts undertaken by others.