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Imagining the Americas in Print

Books, Maps and Encounters in the Atlantic World

Series:

Michiel van Groesen

In Imagining the Americas in Print, Michiel van Groesen reveals the variety of ways in which publishers and printers in early modern Europe gathered information about the Americas, constructed a narrative, and used it to further colonial ambitions in the Atlantic world (1500–1700). The essays examine the creative ways in which knowledge was manufactured in printing workshops. Collectively they bring to life the vivid print culture that determined the relationship between the Old World and the New in the Age of Encounters, and chart the genres that reflected and shaped the European imagination, and helped to legitimate ideologies of colonialism in the next two centuries.

Sailing Across the World's Oceans

History & Catalogue of Dutch Charts Printed on Vellum 1580-1725

Günter Schilder and Hans Kok

After covering the Dutch VOC manuscript charts on vellum in Sailing for the East (ESHC 10, 2010), the printed charts on vellum by commercial Amsterdam chart-publishers cried out for scrutiny as well. Sailing Across the World’s Oceans discusses these rare remaining charts, of which some 150 copies could be traced, mostly kept in international institutions. Their titles run from Europe to Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean, the latter commonly called West-Indische Paskaerten. The charts are described and analysed in an illustrated cartobibliography. The extensive introduction investigates the development of Amsterdam as a recognized centre for map production and distribution in Europe. It also discusses navigation techniques used in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The developing world image is considered, as it may be derived from Dutch contributions. This book delivers insight into chart-making history that has not been available before.

Maps in Newspapers

Approaches of Study and Practices in Portraying War since 19th Century

Series:

André Reyes Novaes

Maps in newspapers generated many discussions among cartographers and geographers working from different approaches and theoretical backgrounds. This work examines these maps from a historiographical as well as a historical perspective. It considers three main questions, namely how maps in the press should be conceptualized, how cartographic images in newspapers have been studied, and how these images changed over time. In order to provide a perspective on the origins, development, and impact of war maps in the press, we will explore maps representing three geopolitical conflicts for Brazilian audiences: The War of the Triple Alliance (1864–1870), the World War II (1939–1945) and the War on Drugs in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas (1994–2010). By exploring maps on these wars, we will identify specific cartographic practices used in this genre as well as the connections that this mode has with other types of map production and consumption.

Brabantia Ducatus

Geschiedenis en Cartobibliografie van het Hertogdom Brabant tot 1795

Mario Dorigo and Mathieu Franssen

Deze inventarisatie van de gedrukte kaarten van het hertogdom Brabant omvat alle kaarten die gepubliceerd zijn tussen 1536, wanneer voor het eerst een kaart van Brabant wordt vermeld, en 1795, toen het feodale hertogdom werd opgeheven. De cartobibliografie betreft uitsluitend gedrukte kaarten, zowel houtsneden als koperdiepdrukken. In vier introductiehoofdstukken worden achtereenvolgens de geschiedenis van het hertogdom, de cartografie van het hertogdom, de wijzingen in het kaartbeeld in de loop van de tijd en de ontwikkeling van de nauwkeurigheid van kaarten met behulp van het programma MapAnalyst beschreven.
De cartobibliografie bevat kaarten van het hele hertogdom, de vier kwartieren, het noorden en het zuiden en een viertal historische kaarten. Alle kaarttitels zijn volledig, aangevuld met een toelichting, de publicatiewijze en een lijst van vindplaatsen, met nadruk op Nederland en België.

This catalogue of printed maps of the Duchy of Brabant includes all the maps published between 1536, the date of the earliest mention of a map of Brabant, and 1795, when the feudal duchy was abolished. It includes woodcuts and intaglio prints. Four introductory chapters discribe the history of the duchy, the catrography of the duchy, the changes in the cartographic image over time and the evolution of the accuracy of the maps over time.
The cartobibliography contains maps of the entire duchy, maps of the four quarters, and maps of the north and south. All map titles are complete and supplemented with explanatory remarks, the manner of publication, and a list of locations where copies can be found, emphasizing the Netherlands and Belgium.
In Dutch, with an English summary.

Networked Nation

Mapping German Cities in Sebastian Münster’s 'Cosmographia'

Series:

Jasper Cornelis van Putten

In Networked Nation: Mapping German Cities in Sebastian Münster’s 'Cosmographia', Jasper van Putten examines the groundbreaking woodcut city views in the German humanist Sebastian Münster’s Cosmographia. This description of the world, published in Basel from 1544 to 1628, glorified the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation and engendered the city book genre. Van Putten argues that Münster’s network of city view makers and contributors—from German princes and artists to Swiss woodcutters, draftsmen, and printers—expressed their local and national cultural identities in the views. The Cosmographia, and the city books it inspired, offer insights into the development of German and Swiss identity from 1550 to Switzerland’s independence from the empire in 1648.

Edited by Surekha Davies and Asa Simon Mittman

This innovative series seeks monographs and essay collections that investigate how notions of space, geography, and mapping shaped medieval and early modern cultures. While the history of cartography has traditionally focused on internal developments in European mapping conventions and technologies, pre-modern scribes, illuminators, and printers of maps tended to work in multiple genres. Spatial thinking informed and was informed by multiple epistemologies and perceptions of the order of nature. Maps, Spaces, Cultures therefore integrates the study of cartography and geography within cultural history. It puts genres that reflected and constituted spatial thinking into dialogue with the cultures that produced and consumed them, as well as with those they represented.

The editors welcome submissions from scholars of the histories of art, material culture, colonialism, exploration, ethnography (including that of peoples described as monsters), encounters, literature, philosophy, religion, science and knowledge, as well as of the history of cartography and related disciplines. They encourage interdisciplinary submissions that cross traditional historical, geographical, or methodological boundaries, that include works from outside Western Europe and outside the Christian tradition, and that develop new analytical approaches to pre-modern spatial thinking, cartography, and the geographical imagination.

Companions in Geography

East-West Collaboration in the Mapping of Qing China (c. 1685-1735)

Series:

Mario Cams

In Companions in Geography Mario Cams revisits the early 18th century mapping of Qing China, without doubt one of the largest cartographic endeavours of the early modern world. Commonly seen as a Jesuit initiative, the project appears here as the result of a convergence of interests among the French Academy of Sciences, the Jesuit order, and the Kangxi emperor (r. 1661-1722). These connections inspired the gradual integration of European and East Asian scientific practices and led to a period of intense land surveying, executed by large teams of Qing officials and European missionaries. The resulting maps and atlases, all widely circulated across Eurasia, remained the most authoritative cartographic representations of continental East Asia for over a century.

This book is based on Dr. Mario Cams' dissertation, which has been awarded the "2017 DHST Prize for Young Scholars" from the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Division of History of Science and Technology (IUHPST/DHST).

Erudite Eyes

Friendship, Art and Erudition in the Network of Abraham Ortelius (1527-1598)

Series:

Tine Luk Meganck

Erudite Eyes explores the network of the Antwerp cartographer Abraham Ortelius (1527-1598), a veritable trading zone of art and erudition. Populated by such luminaries as Pieter Bruegel, Joris Hoefnagel, Justus Lipsius and Benedictus Arias Montanus, among others, this vibrant antiquarian culture yielded new knowledge about local antiquities and distant civilizations, and offered a framework for articulating art and artistic practice. These fruitful exchanges, undertaken in a spirit of friendship and collaboration, are all the more astonishing when seen against the backdrop of the ongoing wars. Based on a close reading of early modern letters, alba amicorum, printed books, manuscripts and artworks, this book situates Netherlandish art and culture between Bruegel and Rubens in a European perspective.

Early Dutch Maritime Cartography

The North Holland School of Cartography (c. 1580-c. 1620)

Günter Schilder

Winner of the 2019 Menno Hertzberger Prize for Book History and Bibliography

This book is an exposition of an important, yet previously unknown chapter in the history of Dutch maritime cartography. While Amsterdam was developing into Europe’s most vital commercial hub in the seventeenth century, demanding and controlling the production of maps and sea-charts, a major School of Cartography was already flourishing in the so-called ‘Kop van Noord-Holland’ region just north of Amsterdam. This School specialised in the production of small-scale charts of larger areas, including the European coastlines and the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. Its masters used to call themselves ‘caert-schrijvers’ or ‘map-scribes’ when clarifying their profession. The cities of Enkhuizen and Edam were important trading ports and as such provided an ideal environment for developing into centres of cartography, serving sea-borne navigation.
Apart from the well-known printed pilot guides by Lucas Jansz Waghenaer, the output of these ‘caert-schrijvers’ consists mainly of manuscript charts on vellum. Copies, though few they are, nowadays can be found across the globe. Sea-charts provided invaluable on-board navigation assistance to ship captains. However, another surprising contemporaneous purpose for financing these charts become popular. Rich ship owners and merchants would commission new charts to serve as wall-decoration as well as a reference point for their maritime-related conversations. They feature a decorative lay-out filled with magnificent colours. Moreover, many of these charts are embellished with miniature paintings, certainly making them some of the most beautiful exemplars ever produced by Dutch cartography during its Golden Age.

Kaarten van de Nederlandse Antillen

Curaçao, Aruba, Bonaire, Saba, Sint Eustatius en Sint Maarten tot 1900

W.E. Renkema

Edited by Paula van Gestel-Van het Schip, Ferjan Ormeling and Peter C.J. van der Krogt

This publication systematically categorizes and provides a nearly complete overview of the great variety of maps, both manuscript and printed, that have been made of the Dutch Antilles. The map descriptions are clarified with information on the creators of the maps and the historical background of the map image. The author has extensively studied how and for which reasons these maps were created. The cartobibliography is preceded by an extensive introduction in which the history of the islands and their inhabitants are described.

In Dutch, with an English summary.