Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Phonetics & Phonology x
  • Applied Linguistics x
  • Languages and Linguistics x
Clear All
Author: Hang Zhang
Tones are the most challenging aspect of learning Chinese pronunciation for adult learners and traditional research mostly attributes tonal errors to interference from learners’ native languages. In Second Language Acquisition of Mandarin Chinese Tones, Hang Zhang offers a series of cross-linguistic studies to argue that there are factors influencing tone acquisition that extend beyond the transfer of structures from learners’ first languages, and beyond characteristics extracted from Chinese. These factors include universal phonetic and phonological constraints as well as pedagogical issues. By examining non-native Chinese tone productions made by speakers of non-tonal languages (English, Japanese, and Korean), this book brings together theory and practice and uses the theoretical insights to provide concrete suggestions for teachers and learners of Chinese.
Authors: Anna Feldman and Jirka Hana
While supervised corpus-based methods are highly accurate for different NLP tasks, including morphological tagging, they are difficult to port to other languages because they require resources that are expensive to create. As a result, many languages have no realistic prospect for morpho-syntactic annotation in the foreseeable future. The method presented in this book aims to overcome this problem by significantly limiting the necessary data and instead extrapolating the relevant information from another, related language. The approach has been tested on Catalan, Portuguese, and Russian. Although these languages are only relatively resource-poor, the same method can be in principle applied to any inflected language, as long as there is an annotated corpus of a related language available. Time needed for adjusting the system to a new language constitutes a fraction of the time needed for systems with extensive, manually created resources: days instead of years.
This book touches upon a number of topics: typology, morphology, corpus linguistics, contrastive linguistics, linguistic annotation, computational linguistics and Natural Language Processing (NLP). Researchers and students who are interested in these scientific areas as well as in cross-lingual studies and applications will greatly benefit from this work. Scholars and practitioners in computer science and linguistics are the prospective readers of this book.
Authors: Steven Chin and David Pisoni
"Alcohol and Speech" serves as a single, unifying reference source for those interested in speech motor effects evident in the acoustic record, reaction times, speech communication strategies, and perceptual judgments. Written by a linguist and a psychologist, the book provides an analytic orientation toward speech and alcohol with an emphasis on laboratory-based research in acoustic-phonetics and speech science. It is a comprehensive review of the effects of alcohol on speech and compares the various theoretical concerns which form this research. Studies of both alcohol and speech have been rare because each field has its own experimental protocols, methodologies, and research agendas. This book fills a long-standing gap and is unique in providing both breadth of coverage and depth of analysis. A case study involving the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound develops some of the legal implications of this research. It illustrates a unified perspective for the study of alcohol and speech. It contains the benefit of years of research on alcohol and speech. It provides a wealth of research to investigators in a wide variety of disciplines: medicine, psychology, speech, forensics, law, and human factors. It demonstrates how alcohol and speech research applies in a practical situation: the Exxon Valdez grounding. It includes a glossary as well as numerous tables and graphs for a quick overview of data and results.
Author: Cecilia Odé