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Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek 68 (2018)

Lessons in Art. Art, Education, and Modes of Instruction since 1500

Edited by Ann-Sophie Lehmann and Bart Ramakers

Why, how, to whom and by whom was art taught? Lessons in Art (Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art, Vol 68) provides new answers to these questions by addressing the relation between art and education in the Netherlands from 1500 to the 1970s. The authors gathered in this volume consider the practical education of artists within a wide societal context. They present new ways of looking at teaching materials and methods and show how art was employed as a powerful teaching aid. From early-modernity to the present, education, it appears, fuels the production and perception of art.

Table of Contents
1. Ann-Sophie Lehmann & Bart Ramakers, Introduction
2. Caecilie Weissert, Clément Perret’s Exercitatio alphabetica (1569). A calligraphic textbook and sample book on eloquence
3. Koen Jonckheere, Aertsen, Rubens and the questye in early modern painting
4. Edward H. Wouk, From Lambert Lombard to Aby Warburg. Pathosformel as grammar
5. Bart Ramakers, Paper, paint, and metal foil. How to costume a tyrant in late sixteenth century Holland
6. Jenny Boulboullé, Drawn up by a learned physician from the mouths of artisans. The Mayerne manuscript revisited
7. Erin Travers, Jacob van der Gracht’s Anatomie for artists
8. Julie Remond, ‘Draw everything that exists in the world’. ’t Light der Teken en Schilderkonst and the shaping of art education in early modern northern Europe
9. Ann-Sophie Lehmann, An alphabet of colours. Painting as practice and metaphor in seventeenth-century pedagogy
10. Joost Keizer, Rembrandt’s nature. The ethics of teaching style in the Dutch Republic
11. Erin Downey, Learning in Netherlandish workshops in seventeenth-century Rome
12. Annemarie Kok, Do it yourself! Lessons in participation in a dynamic labyrinth in the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
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Paul F. Grendler

Paul F. Grendler, noted historian of European education, surveys Jesuit schools and universities throughout Europe from the first school founded in 1548 to the suppression of the Society of Jesus in 1773. The Jesuits were noted educators who founded and operated an international network of schools and universities that enrolled students from the age of ten through doctoral studies. The essay analyzes the organization, curriculum, pedagogy, culture, financing, relations with civil authorities, enrollments, and social composition of students in Jesuit pre-university schools. Grendler then explains Jesuit universities. The Jesuits governed and did all the teaching in small collegiate universities. In large civic-Jesuit universities the Jesuits taught the humanities, philosophy, and theology, while lay professors taught law and medicine. The article provides examples ranging from the first Jesuit school in Messina, Sicily, to universities across Europe. It features a complete list of Jesuit schools in France.
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Forming Catholic Communities

Irish, Scots and English College Networks in Europe, 1568–1918

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Edited by Liam Chambers and Thomas O'Connor

Forming Catholic Communities assesses the histories of Irish, English and Scots colleges established abroad in the early-modern period for Catholic students. The contributions provide a co-ordinated series of case studies which reflect the most up-to-date research on the colleges. The essays address interactions with European states, international networking, educational frameworks, financial challenges, print culture and institutional survival into the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. From these essays, the colleges emerge as unexpectedly complex institutions. With their financial, pastoral, and intellectual networks, they provided an educational infrastructure that, whatever its short-comings, remained crucial to the domestic and international communities they served during more than two centuries.