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The series Homo Technologicus, Social and Ethical Futures, explores philosophical, social, and ethical issues generated by scientific research and innovations able to modify humanity, and alter our self-understanding as humans. Philosophy and ethics should be cognizant of, and involved with, advances in biology, medicine, neuroscience, computing, and engineering, and their combinations in transformative technologies. Current and future generations of scholars, citizens, and policy-makers deserve well-informed assessments of the capabilities and limitations of new technosciences, and their potential effects on individuals, public health and welfare, and social institutions. Homo Technologicus, the technological species, must be central to our personal, moral, civic, legal, and political futures.
Volume Editors: Olli Loukola and Leonidas Donskis
Secrets and conspiracies have always played an important role in human history, and today conspiracy theories have become a rather disconcerting practice for picturing our world and our relations with each other. How seriously are we to take them, then? Are we to completely discard them as political rhetoric, purposeful misinformation, or even individual delusions? Or should we take them as serious, perhaps even scientific theories? This collection purports to provide a sober analysis of the much-debated issues and tries to develop and outline conceptual and theoretical tools to make sense of what secrets and conspiracies truly are.
Author: Fred Orton
Fred Orton’s teaching and writing has always combined theoretical and formal – which to say structural - analysis with historical research and reflection. This collection of essays – rewritten studies of Paul Cézanne, Jasper Johns, the American cultural critic Harold Rosenberg and a new essay on Marx and Engels’ notion of ideology – brings together some of his most decisive contributions to thinking about fine art practice and rethinking the theory and methods of the social history of art. More than an anthology, it offers a vivid demonstration of how theory can work to generate new interpretations and unsettle old ones.
The Anthology of the Works of Ugo Spirito captures the trajectory of Ugo Spirito’s complex body of thought that spanned more than fifty years, from 1921 to 1977. While confronting difficult contemporary problems related to philosophy and science, liberalism and socialism, fascism and communism, and other economic and ideological aspects such as corporativism and democracy, Spirito revealed a persistent desire to reach truth and the absolute. Yet, he also voiced his failure to remain faithful to any philosophical or political system considered definitive and unquestionable. Unable to reach incontrovertibility, he consistently dissected the prevailing contemporary ideas and systems, including his own beliefs, developing at the same time the ‘antinomic’ approach, a method of critical analysis that undermined any truth reputed irrefutable. Today, Spirito stands as one of most anti-conformist Italian thinkers for he challenged the certainties of modern thought.
Volume Editors: Tamara Nair and Maria Inês Amaro
Citizenship is one of the most important legacies of human development. It raises the human status from a biological condition into a cultural, moral, political and rationalistic one. It is a constantly evolving process, which at each new turn, adds complexity to human existence.
After the breakthroughs of the eighteenth century, with the first steps in recognition of civil and political rights, and of the twentieth century with the advancement of social rights and the emergence of cultural and environmental rights, one could conclude that the twenty-first century would see an enlargement of citizenship ideas and ideals. Has this indeed happened? Where are we now when it comes to identifying ourselves as citizens?
Varying across several disciplines, this volume addresses the complexities of citizenship and our attempts to make sense of them.
In Corona: The Once-in-a-Century Health Crisis and Its Teachings. Towards A More Multi-Resilient Post-Corona World Roland Benedikter and Karim Fathi first describe the pluri-dimensional characteristics of the Coronavirus crisis. Then they draw the pillars for a more “multi-resilient” Post-Corona world including socio-political recommendations of how to generate it. The Coronavirus crisis proved to be a bundle crisis consisting of multiple, interconnected crisis dimensions.

Before Corona, most concepts of a “resilient society” implied a rather isolated focus on only one crisis at a time. Future preparedness in the 21st century will require a multi- and transdisciplinary risk-management concept that the authors call “multi-resilience”. “Multi-resilience” means to systematically enhance universal resilience competencies of societies, such as collective intelligence or overall responsiveness, being appliable to pluri-dimensional crisis contexts. If the Coronavirus crisis in retrospect will have contributed to implement multi-resilience, than it will ultimately have contributed to progress.
Philosophical Foundations and Current Debates