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Emotions ( pathè) such as anger, fear, shame, and envy have long been underestimated in Plato’s philosophy. The aim of Emotions in Plato is to provide a consistent account of the role of emotions in Plato’s psychology, epistemology, ethics and political theory. The volume focuses on three main issues: taxonomy of emotions, their epistemic status, and their relevance for the ethical and political theory and practice. This volume, which is the first edited volume entirely dedicated to emotions in Plato’s philosophy, shows how Plato, in many aspects, was positively interested in these affective states in order to support the rule of reason.
Les philosophes de l’Antiquité ont fait de la vertu le cœur de leurs théories éthiques et politiques. Les philosophes face au vice, de Socrate à Augustin jette une lumière nouvelle sur ces théories en explorant comment les principaux philosophes de l’Antiquité (Socrate, Platon, Aristote, Plotin, Augustin) et les principales écoles philosophiques (épicuriens et stoïciens) se sont attachés à tracer une cartographie de cet envers de la vertu qu’est le vice, à examiner ses causes et ses puissances, à détailler les moyens de s’en défaire, et parfois même, d’en faire usage, pour avancer sur le chemin de la vertu. Le volume rassemble 15 contributions originales en anglais, français et italien, écrites par des spécialistes renommés de l’histoire de la philosophie antique et des études classiques.


Virtue is undoubtedly one of the core issues for the ethical and political theories of ancient philosophers and is therefore well-worn territory for scholars of ancient philosophy. Les philosophes face au vice, de Socrate à Augustin breaks new ground by considering how the main ancient philosophers (Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Augustine) and philosophical schools (Epicureans, Stoics) considered vice, the opposite of virtue, how they described the many vices, delineated their various kinds, accounted for their causes and effects, and reflected on how to cure them, and, even, use them on the path toward virtue. The book gathers 15 original contributions in English, French and Italian by leading scholars in the field of ancient philosophy and classics.
An Edition of the Reconstructed Text of the Placita with a Commentary and a Collection of Related Texts
Editors: Jaap Mansfeld and David Runia
A new reconstruction and text of the Placita of Aëtius (ca. 50 CE), accompanied by a full commentary and an extensive collection of related texts. This compendium, arguably the most important doxographical text to survive from antiquity, is known through the intensive use made of it by authors in later antiquity and beyond. Covering the entire field of natural philosophy, it has long been mined as a source of information about ancient philosophers and their views. It now receives a thorough analysis as a remarkable work in its own right. This volume is the culmination of a five-volume set of studies on Aëtius (1996–2020): Aëtiana I (ISBN: 9789004105805, 1996), II (Parts 1&2; set ISBN 9789004172067; 2008), III (ISBN 9789004180413; 2009), IV (ISBN: 9789004361454, 2018), and V (Parts 1-4). It uses an innovative methodology to replace the seminal edition of Hermann Diels (1879).
Introduction, Translation, and Commentary
On the Life of Abraham displays Philo’s philosophical, exegetical, and literary genius at its best. Philo begins by introducing the biblical figures Enos, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as unwritten laws. Then, interweaving literal, ethical, and allegorical interpretations, Philo presents the life and achievements of Abraham, founder of the Jewish nation, in the form of a Greco-Roman bios, or biography. Ellen Birnbaum and John Dillon explain why and how this work is important within the context of Philo’s own oeuvre, early Jewish and Christian exegesis, and ancient philosophy. They also offer a new English translation and detailed analyses, in which they elucidate the meaning of Philo’s thought, including his perplexing notion that Israel’s ancestors were laws in themselves.
The essays in this volume explore the many aspects of the “political” in the plays of Greek comic dramatist Aristophanes (5th century BCE), posing a variety of questions and approaching them through diverse methodological lenses. They demonstrate that “politics” as reflected in Aristophanes’ plays remains a fertile, and even urgent, area of inquiry, as political developments in our own time distinctly color the ways in which we articulate questions about classical Athens. As this volume shows, the earlier scholarship on politics in (or “and”) Aristophanes, which tended to focus on determining Aristophanes’ “actual” political views, has by now given way to approaches far more sensitive to how comic literary texts work and more attentive to the complexities of Athenian political structures and social dynamics. All the studies in this volume grapple to varying degrees with such methodological tensions, and show, that the richer and more diverse our political readings of Aristophanes can become, the less stable and consistent, as befits a comic work, they appear to be.
Mutual Recognition
In Early Christians Adapting to the Roman Empire: Mutual Recognition Niko Huttunen challenges the interpretation of early Christian texts as anti-imperial documents. He presents examples of the positive relationship between early Christians and the Roman society. With the concept of “recognition” Huttunen describes a situation in which the parties can come to terms with each other without full agreement. Huttunen provides examples of non-Christian philosophers recognizing early Christians. He claims that recognition was a response to Christians who presented themselves as philosophers. Huttunen reads Romans 13 as a part of the ancient tradition of the law of the stronger. His pioneering study on early Christian soldiers uncovers the practical dimension of recognizing the empire.
Demokrit, die Sokratiker, Platon und Aristoteles
In der Antike wurden Philosophie und Wissenschaft vielfach zergliedert: in göttliche und menschliche Weisheit, in Mathematik und Technik, in Naturphilosophie und Ethik. Stets ging es dabei auch um das Verhältnis zwischen Theorie und Praxis. Im Buch wird gezeigt, wie die umfassende Weisheit der Vorsokratiker von den Schülern des Sokrates zerteilt wurde, wie Platon die getrennten Disziplinen als Einheit begriff und das Weisheitsideal der Vorsokratiker wiederbelebte, und wie Aristoteles die Verbindung zwischen theoretischen und praktischen Wissenschaften lockerte, ohne sie völlig aufzulösen. Zugleich werden die Denkformen untersucht, die beim Nachdenken über Theorie und Praxis zur Anwendung kamen: die Gegenüberstellung polarer Gegensätze und die Reduktion auf Elemente, die Platonische Klassifikationsmethode und die Aristotelische Proshen-Aussage. Diese Denkformen hängen eng mit den grundsätzlichen Standpunkten und Methoden des jeweiligen Philosophen zusammen. Jede Denkform hat aber auch ihre besonderen Konsequenzen für das Theorie-Praxis-Verständnis. So macht das Buch die Geschichte des philosophischen Verständnisses von Theorie und Praxis von den Vorsokratikern bis zum Ende der klassischen Antike greifbar.
A Critical Edition with an Introduction, Notes and Indices
Aristotle's De Animalibus was an important source of zoological knowledge for the ancient Greeks and for medieval Arabs and Europeans. In the thirteenth century, the work was twice translated into Latin. One translation was produced directly from the Greek by William of Moerbeke. An earlier translation, made available as a critical edition in the present volume for the first time, was produced through an intermediary Arabic translation (Kitāb al-Ḥayawān) by Michael Scot (1175 - c. 1232). Scot's translation was one of the main sources of knowledge on animals in Europe and widely used until well into the fifteenth century. As a faithful translation of a translation produced by a Syriac-speaking Christian, the text contributes to our knowledge of Middle Arabic. The De Animalibus is composed of three sections: History of Animals (ten books), Parts of Animals (four books) and Generation of Animals (five books). Parts of Animals and Generation of Animals were published by BRILL as Volumes 5.2 and 5.3 of the book series ASL in 1998 (ASL 5.2) and 1992 (ASL 5.3). The present Volume 5.1.a contains the first section of Scot's translation of History of Animals: the general introduction and books 1-3, with Notes. Editions of the two concluding parts of History of Animals, ASL 5.1.b, books 4-6 and ASL 5.1.c, books 7-10, are in preparation. Complete Latin-Arabic and Arabic-Latin indices of History of Animals will be published in due course.
Philosopher en commun, tourner sa pensée vers Dieu
Françoise Frazier’s Quelques aspects du platonisme de Plutarque: Philosopher en commun, Tourner sa pensée vers Dieu includes 20 essays on several philosophical tractates in Plutarch’s Moralia. Interesting both for Classists and Historians of Religion alike, the chapters provide an in-depth interpretation of several essential aspects of Plutarch’s philosophical dialogues that pays special heed both to the divine and the communication between God and humans. The book includes three sections. While the first is mainly concerned with Plutarch’s Amatorius, the second focuses on Plutarch’s relationship to Plato, especially in his myths of the afterlife. The third part, finally, deals with an important investigation that occupied Professor Frazier lately, namely the concept of pistis in the religious context of the first centuries CE.
Studies in Hermias’ Commentary on Plato’s Phaedrus is a collection of twelve essays that consider aspects of Hermias’ philosophy, including his notions of the soul, logic, and method of exegesis. The essays also consider Hermias’ work in the tradition of Neoplatonism, particularly in relation to the thought of Iamblichus and Proclus. The collection grapples with the question of the originality of Hermias’ commentary—the only extant work of Hermias—which is a series of lectures notes of his teacher, Syrianus.