Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 3,743 items for :

  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All

Edited by Govert J. Buijs and Simon Polinder

International relations are in constant turbulence. Globalisation, the rise and fall of superpowers, the fragilisation of the EU, trade wars, real wars, terrorism, persecution, new nationalism and identity politics, climate change, are just a few of the recent disturbing developments. How can international issues be understood and addressed from a Christian faith perspective? In this book answers are presented from various Christian traditions: Neo-calvinism, Catholic social teaching, critical theory and Christian realism. The volume offers fundamental theological and Christian philosophical perspectives on international relations and global challenges, case studies about inspiring Christian leaders such as Robert Schuman, Dag Hammarskjöld, Abraham Kuyper and prophetic critiques of supranational issues.

Counter-Terrorism Financing

International Best Practices and the Law

Series:

Nathalie Rébé

In Counter-Terrorism Financing: International Best Practices and the Law, Nathalie Rébé, offers a new comprehensive framework for CTF worldwide and reviews the strengths and weaknesses of current regulations and policies.
Both accessible, interesting and engaging in how it approaches chronic problems of Counter-Terrorism Financing, this book provides general understanding of this topic with a literature review and a gap-analysis based on CTF experts’ advices, as well as a very detailed analysis of current international regulatory tools.
Nathalie Rébé’s ‘all-in’one’ CTF manual is innovative in this field and provides answers for the international community to fight terrorism financing together more effectively, using a set of standards which promotes strong and diligent cooperation between countries concerning reporting, information exchange and gathering, as well as enforcement.

Series:

Melinda McGarrah Sharp

Multiple forms of oppression, injustice, and violence today have roots in histories of colonialism. This connection to the past feels familiar for some and less relevant for others. Understanding and responding to these connections is more crucial than ever, yet some resist rather than face this task directly. Others resist oppressive postcolonial conditions.

Using intercultural stories and pastoral care scholarship, this book charts pathways through five resistances (not me, not here, not now, not relevant, not possible) to awaken creative pastoral care in a postcolonial world. McGarrah Sharp recommends practices that everyone can do: believing in each other, revisiting how histories are taught, imagining more passable futures, heeding prophetic poets, and crossing borders with healthy boundaries.

Series:

William J. Hoye

Aquinas’ theology can be understood only if one comes to grips with his metaphysics of being. The relevance of this perspective is exhibited in his treatment of topics like creation, goodness, happiness, truth, freedom of the will, the unity of the human being, prayer and providence, God’s personhood, divine love, God and violence, God’s unknowablility, the Incarnation, the Trinity, God’s existence, theological language and even laughter. This book endeavors to treat these questions in a clear and convincing language. Is there a better method for improving one’s own theology than by grappling with the arguments of Thomas Aquinas?

Faith in African Lived Christianity

Bridging Anthropological and Theological Perspectives

Series:

Edited by Karen Lauterbach and Mika Vähäkangas

Faith in African Lived Christianity – Bridging Anthropological and Theological Perspectives offers a comprehensive, empirically rich and interdisciplinary approach to the study of faith in African Christianity. The book brings together anthropology and theology in the study of how faith and religious experiences shape the understanding of social life in Africa. The volume is a collection of chapters by prominent Africanist theologians, anthropologists and social scientists, who take people’s faith as their starting point and analyze it in a contextually sensitive way. It covers discussions of positionality in the study of African Christianity, interdisciplinary methods and approaches and a number of case studies on political, social and ecological aspects of African Christian spirituality.

From Easter to Holy Week

The Paschal Mystery and Liturgical Renewal in the Twentieth Century

Series:

Laura E. Moore

The story of the twentieth-century Liturgical Movement is, more than anything else, about the rediscovery and renewed understanding of the fundamental reality of the Paschal Mystery and of the Paschal identity of the Church. This identity is expressed and celebrated whenever the Body of Christ – every member – welcomes new members in the waters of baptism and feasts with them in the Eucharist, especially as these are celebrated during Holy Week.

This book explores this rediscovery, first in the Roman Catholic Church and then in the Episcopal Church and other Churches of the Anglican Communion, and looks in particular at how both grassroots and official work played a role in renewing and restoring the liturgical celebrations of Holy Week.

Law’s Dominion

Jewish Community, Religion, and Family in Early Modern Metz

Series:

Jay R. Berkovitz

In Law’s Dominion, Jay Berkovitz offers a novel approach to the history of early modern Jewry. Set in the city of Metz, on the Moselle river, this study of a vibrant prerevolutionary community draws on a wide spectrum of legal sources that tell a story about community, religion, and family that has not been told before.

Focusing on the community’s leadership, public institutions, and judiciary, this study challenges the assumption that Jewish life was in a steady state of decline before the French Revolution. To the contrary, the evidence reveals a robust community that integrated religious values and civic consciousness, interacted with French society, and showed remarkable signs of collaboration between Jewish law and the French judicial system.

Non-Person

Grenzen des Humanen in Literatur, Kultur und Medien

Series:

Edited by Stephanie Catani and Stephanie Waldow

Mit dem Begriff der Non-Person nimmt der Band rechtliche, medizinische, politische und gesellschaftliche Inklusions- wie Exklusionsverfahren in den Blick, die über das Mensch-Sein, den Personenstatus und seine Grenzen bestimmen.
Der Band versucht den Begriff der Person vor dem Hintergrund seiner breiten interdisziplinären Semantik zu definieren und nimmt spezifisch ästhetische Figurationen von Non-Persons in den Blick. Medial vermittelte wie literarisch imaginierte Non-Persons lassen sich etwa dort untersuchen, wo sie als Grenzgänger geltende Binäroppositionen sichtbar machen und deren identitätsstabilisierendes wie -destabilisierendes Potenzial kritisch befragen. Besondere Brisanz erfährt der Begriff durch weltweite Flucht- und Migrationsbewegungen, die nicht erst im 21. Jahrhundert die Frage nach der menschenrechtlichen Situation Flüchtender, Staatenloser und Asylsuchender dringlich werden lassen.

Ungeheurer Atlantik

Absenz und Wiederkehr in ausgewählten atlantischen Poetiken des 20. Jahrhunderts

Series:

Eleonore Zapf

Während der Atlantik in der Antike als unüberwindbar galt, verwandelte er sich im Zeitalter der modernen Globalisierung in einen transmarinen Raum der ständigen Bewegung und Aushandlung verschiedener kultureller Konzepte. Doch auch in diesem aufgeklärten Kontext behält der Atlantik in der poetischen Phantasie noch immer Merkmale des Ungeheuren.
Das Verdrängte taucht auf unheimliche Weise wieder auf und konfrontiert die Kulturgeschichte mit ihrer vergessenen Vergangenheit. Der Band erweitert US-amerikanische Ansätze der Atlantic Studies um spanische, lusitanische und karibische Sichtweisen und analysiert atlantische Texte von Fernando Pessoa, Édouard Glissant, Derek Walcott und Manuel Padorno.

Artistic Mentoring as a Decolonizing Methodology

An Evolving 18-year Collaborative Painting Ethnography with Maya Artists

Series:

Kryssi Staikidis

To expand the possibilities of “doing arts thinking” from a non-Eurocentric view, Artistic Mentoring as a Decolonizing Methodology: An Evolving 18-year Collaborative Painting Ethnography with Maya Artists is grounded in Indigenous perspectives on arts practice, arts research, and art education. Mentored in painting for eighteen years by two Guatemalan Maya artists, Kryssi Staikidis, a North American painter and art education professor, used both Indigenous and decolonizing methodologies, which involve respectful collaboration, and continuously reexamined her positions as student, artist, and ethnographer searching to redefine and transform the roles of the artist as mentor, historian/activist, ethnographer, and teacher.

The primary purpose of the book is to illuminate the Maya artists as mentors, the collaborative and holistic processes underlying their painting, and the teaching and insights from their studios. These include Imagined Realism, a process excluding rendering from observation, and the fusion of pedagogy and curriculum into a holistic paradigm of decentralized teaching, negotiated curriculum, personal and cultural narrative as thematic content, and the surrounding visual culture and community as text.

The Maya artist as cultural historian creates paintings as platforms of protest and vehicles of cultural transmission, for example, genocide witnessed in paintings as historical evidence. The mentored artist as ethnographer cedes the traditional ethnographic authority of the colonizing stance to the Indigenous expert as partner and mentor, and under this mentorship analyzes its possibilities as decolonizing arts-based qualitative inquiry. For the teacher, Maya world views broaden and integrate arts practice and arts research, inaugurating possibilities to transform arts education.