Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 56 items for :

  • Reference Work x
  • Middle East and Islamic Studies x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Editor:
The Encyclopædia Iranica is dedicated to the study of Iranian civilization in the Middle East, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Indian Subcontinent. It also includes scholarly articles related to the reciprocal influences between Persia and its neighbors, extending from pre-history to the present. The disciplines represented include: anthropology, archaeology, geography, art history, ethnology, sociology, economics, history of religion, philosophy, mysticism, history of science and medicine, Islamic history, botany, zoology, folklore, development of agriculture and industry, political science, international relations, and diplomatic history.
Fascicle 2 of Volume XVII (pp. 113-224) starts with the entry "Khotan III. History in the Islamic Period" and ends with "King of the Benighted." The 112 new pages of the Encyclopædia Iranica project reflect the latest developments in the field of Iranian studies.
Volume XVII Fascicle 1
Editor:
The Encyclopædia Iranica is dedicated to the study of Iranian civilization in the Middle East, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Indian Subcontinent. It also includes scholarly articles related to the reciprocal influences between Persia and its neighbors, extending from pre-history to the present. The disciplines represented include: anthropology, archaeology, geography, art history, ethnology, sociology, economics, history of religion, philosophy, mysticism, history of science and medicine, Islamic history, botany, zoology, folklore, development of agriculture and industry, political science, international relations, and diplomatic history.
Fascicle 1 of Volume XVII (pp. 1-112) starts with the article on xv. The Babi-Bahai Community in Khorasan and ends with the entry on Khotan iii. History in the Islamic Period.The 112 new pages of the Encyclopædia Iranica project reflect the latest developments in the field of Iranian studies.
Author:
This edition contains the collected English translations of the series The Medical Works of Moses Maimonides (17 vols., 2002–2021) that were published by Gerrit Bos in parallel critical editions along with the original Arabic texts. The collection offers three main medical treatises by Maimonides (1138–1204) (Medical Aphorisms; Commentary on Hippocrates’ Aphorisms; On Poisons and the Protection against Lethal Drugs and six minor ones (On Coitus; On the Regimen of Health; On the Elucidation of Some Symptoms and the Response to Them; On Hemorrhoids; On Asthma; On Rules Regarding the Practical Part of the Medical Art, presented for the first time in one harmonized volume, supplemented by indexes of diseases, medicinal ingredients, and quoted physicians.
The Encyclopaedia of Islam: An Anthology in Arabic Translation (4 vols)
تمثّل هذه المختارات أول ظهور لدائرة المعارف الإسلامية باللغة العربية. ودائرة المعارف الإسلامية من أهمّ الأعمال الموسوعيّة وأرسخها قدما في كافة مجالات الدراسات الإسلامية في جميع أنحاء العالم، وهي عصارة جهود جبّارة، تواصلت أكثر من مائة عام؛ شارك فيها أساطين الدراسات الإسلاميّة والمشرقيّة من جميع أنحاء العالم. ترجم معهد تونس للترجمة هذه المختارات إلى اللغة العربيّة حتّى ترفد النسخ الأمّ باللغات الإنجليزيّة والفرنسيّة والألمانيّة. تضمّ ما يزيد عن مائتي مقال رئيسيّ في مواضيع من الحضارة الإسلاميّة، بجميع مقوّماتها التاريخيّة والثقافيّة والدينيّة، ثلثاها تمّ اصطفاؤهما من الإصدار الثاني لدائرة المعارف الإسلاميّة، وثلثها الآخر من الإصدار الثالث. وجميعها مقالات علمية محكّمة، وفّرت، لثلاثة أجيال متتالية أو أربعة، أداة للدارسين الأكاديميين ولبراعم الباحثين وكانت لهم بمثابة مدرسة حاضنة في البحث، تميّزت بصرامة المنهج وغزارة المعلومات ودقّتها وبالموضوعيّة والحياد. وهي خصال تجعل من دائرة المعارف الإسلاميّة سندا متينا للباحث الأكاديميّ في الحضارة الإسلاميّة، وروضة للقارئ الطلعة، ومعينا لا ينضب من النصوص الساندة للمعلّم والمتعلّم. تضمّ هذه الترجمة أربعة مجلّدات، وهي ثمرة تعاون بين مؤسّسة بريل الملكيّة للنشر ومعهد تونس للترجمة.


Dāʾirat al-Maʿārif al-Islāmiyya: Mukhtārāt is the first official translation of the Encyclopaedia of Islam in Arabic. The Encyclopaedia of Islam is the globally respected and preeminent reference work in the field of Islamic Studies. It is the result of an academic enterprise that has been ongoing for over a century now. It brings together the efforts of the most important scholars in the field of Islamic Studies from all over the world. This version forms a welcome addition to the earlier versions of this important work in English, French, and German.
This anthology contains more than two hundred scholarly articles on a variety of topics connected Islam and Muslims, including religious, historical, and cultural matters. Two-thirds of the articles in this anthology originate from the Second Edition of the Encyclopaedia of Islam, one third stems from the Third Edition. It is a valuable tool for academic researchers and general readers alike. The articles can also be used as high quality teaching material.
This translation is the result of a collaboration between Brill and the Tunis Institute for Translation, and is published in four volumes.
Editor:
The Encyclopædia Iranica is dedicated to the study of Iranian civilization in the Middle East, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Indian Subcontinent. It also includes scholarly articles related to the reciprocal influences between Persia and its neighbors, extending from pre-history to the present. The disciplines represented include: anthropology, archaeology, geography, art history, ethnology, sociology, economics, history of religion, philosophy, mysticism, history of science and medicine, Islamic history, botany, zoology, folklore, development of agriculture and industry, political science, international relations, and diplomatic history.

Fascicle 6 of Volume XVI (pp. 561-672) starts with the article on Khomeini and ends with the entry on xiv. Ethnology of Qajar and Pahlavi Khorasan.
Translator:
Winner of the 2021 Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding (category: translation from Arabic into English)

This is an unabridged, annotated, translation of the great Damascene savant and saint Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s (d. 751/1350) Madārij al-Sālikīn. Conceived as a critical commentary on an earlier Sufi classic by the great Hanbalite scholar Abū Ismāʿīl of Herat, Madārij aims to rejuvenate Sufism’s Qurʾanic foundations. The original work was a key text for the Sufi initiates, composed in terse, rhyming prose as a master’s instruction to the aspiring seeker on the path to God, in a journey of a hundred stations whose ultimate purpose was to be lost to one’s self (fanāʾ) and subsist (baqāʾ) in God. The translator, Ovamir (ʿUwaymir) Anjum, provides an extensive introduction and annotation to this English-Arabic face-to-face presentation of this masterpiece of Islamic psychology.
Translator:
Winner of the 2021 Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding (category: translation from Arabic into English)

This is an unabridged, annotated, translation of the great Damascene savant and saint Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s (d. 751/1350) Madārij al-Sālikīn. Conceived as a critical commentary on an earlier Sufi classic by the great Hanbalite scholar Abū Ismāʿīl of Herat, Madārij aims to rejuvenate Sufism’s Qurʾanic foundations. The original work was a key text for the Sufi initiates, composed in terse, rhyming prose as a master’s instruction to the aspiring seeker on the path to God, in a journey of a hundred stations whose ultimate purpose was to be lost to one’s self (fanāʾ) and subsist (baqāʾ) in God. The translator, Ovamir (ʿUwaymir) Anjum, provides an extensive introduction and annotation to this English-Arabic face-to-face presentation of this masterpiece of Islamic psychology.
Editor:
Editor:
Editors / Translators: , , and
This book presents fifty-one didactic and devotional Sufi poems (with English translations) composed by the ulama of Brava, on Somalia’s Benadir coast, in Chimiini, a Bantu language related to Swahili and unique to the town. Because the six ulama-poets, among whom two women, guided local believers towards correct beliefs and behaviours in reference to specific authoritative religious texts, the poems allow insight into their authors’ religious education, affiliations, in which the Qādiriyyah and Aḥmadiyyah took pride of place, and regional connections. Because the poems refer to local people, places, events, and livelihoods, they also bring into view the uniquely local dimension of Islam in this small East African port city in this time-period.