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Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858) designed a series of 70 landscapes depicting the provinces of Japan between 1854 and 1856. It was the first of a number of sets from the highly productive years of his later life. The designs comprising Famous places in the 60-odd provinces (Rokuju yoshu meisho zue) are taken from all corners of Japan. Designs published before this series had already depicted the famous routes between Edo and Kyoto, the Tokaido and the Kisokaido, and various well known locations such as the famous waterfalls, Lake Omi and the Jewel Rivers, but a series on such a grand scale devoted to the provincies was a novelty. It evidently met with critical acclaim as the publishers Koshimuraya Heisuke issued several editions.
In this study, the author Marije Jansen briefly discusses Hiroshige's life and the formal aspects of this series. Jansen takes as her point of departure the set in possession of the German collector Gerhard Pulverer, which is generally acknowledged to be a superb example of a first edition, and compares this series to a number of other sets in public and private collections. The detectable printing variations in each design are carefully analysed, making this an indispensable tool for collectors.
Baron Raimund von Stillfried and Early Yokohama Photography
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A Career of Japan is the first study of one of the major photographers and personalities of nineteenth-century Japan. Baron Raimund von Stillfried was the most important foreign-born photographer of the Meiji era and one of the first globally active photographers of his generation. He played a key role in the international image of Japan and the adoption of photography within Japanese society itself. Yet, the lack of a thorough study of his activities, travels, and work has been a fundamental gap in both Japanese- and Western-language scholarship. Based on extensive new primary sources and unpublished documents from archives around the world, this book examines von Stillfried’s significance as a cultural mediator between Japan and Central Europe. It highlights the tensions and fierce competition that underpinned the globalising photographic industry at a site of cultural contact and exchange – treaty-port Yokohama. In the process, it raises key questions for Japanese visual culture, Habsburg studies, and cross-cultural histories of photography and globalisation.

A Career of Japan is the winner of the 2nd Professor Josef Kreiner Hosei University Award for International Studies (Kreiner Award).

“Luke Gartlan’s book is a compelling and enjoyable read, and contributes major new perspectives to the growing field of Meiji photography. It will certainly be the authoritative work on Raimund von Stillfried, but it is also impressive for its contributions to other important areas of Meiji cultural studies, including representations of the emperor, photography of Hokkaido, and world’s fairs.” Bert Winther-Tamaki (University of California, Irvine)

The Influence of Japanese Sexual Imagery on Western Art
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At its height in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Japonisme had a tremendous impact on Western art. In this publication, author Ricard Bru approaches the cultural phenomenon of Japonisme from an innovative standpoint. He presents an in-depth discussion of the influence of Japanese printed erotic imagery by ukiyo-e masters such as Kitagawa Utamaro, Katsushika Hokusai, and Utagawa Hiroshige on European artists, including Edgar Degas, Auguste Rodin, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustav Klimt and Pablo Picasso, as well as writers, critics, and collectors, such as Edmond de Goncourt, Joris-Karl Huysmans, and Émile Zola. With over 160 color illustrations sourced from public and private collections, Erotic Japonisme demonstrates the rich artistic dialogue that existed between Europe and Japan.
Kawase Hasui's Masterpieces
Following on the success of the catalogue raisonné – Kawase Hasui: The Complete Woodblock Prints – published by Hotei Publishing in 2003, Visions of Japan: Kawase Hasui’s Masterpieces brings together in a single volume one hundred of the artist’s most celebrated prints. Fully illustrated, this publication includes annotated descriptions for each work, as well as two essays on Hasui’s life and work by Dr. Kendall H. Brown.
Kawase Hasui (1883-1957) is considered the foremost Japanese landscape print artist of the 20th century, and he is most closely associated with the pioneering Shin-hanga ('New Prints') publisher Watanabe Shōzaburō (1885-1962). Hasui’s work became hugely popular, not only in his native Japan but also in the West, especially in the United States. His valuable contribution to the woodblock print medium was acknowledged in 1956, a year before his death, when he was honoured with the distinction of ‘Living National Treasure’.
The Transformation of Buddhist Art in Early Medieval Japan
This volume, the first in Brill’s Japanese Visual Culture series, vividly describes the efforts of the Japanese monk Shunjōbō Chōgen (1121–1206) to restore major buildings and works of art lost in a brutal civil conflict in 1180. Chōgen is best known for his role in the recasting of the Great Buddha (Daibutsu) and the reconstructing of the South Great Gate (Nandaimon) of Tōdaiji in Nara and its huge, dramatic wooden guardian figures. This study concentrates on these and other replacement statues and buildings associated with Chōgen and situates the visual arts of Japan into the spiritual and socio-political context of their times. Through meticulous study of dedicatory material, Rosenfield is able to place the splendid Buddhist statues made for Chōgen in vivid new light. The volume also explores how Japan’s rulers employed the visual arts as instruments of government policy – a tactic that recurs throughout the nation’s history. This publication includes an annotated translation of Chōgen’s memoir, completed near the end of his life, in which he recounts his many achievements. In chapters on East Asian portraiture, Rosenfield claims that surviving statues of Chōgen, carved with mordant realism, rank among the world’s most eloquent portraits, and herald the great changes that were to permeate Japanese religious and secular arts in the centuries to come. While Chōgen has been the subject of major art exhibitions and extensive research in Japan; this is the first book-length study to appear in the West.
Shunga by Harunobu and Koryūsai
This title presents a ravishing selection of shunga by the first full-colour woodblock-print masters: Harunobu and Koryūsai. The prints used for this book are of a remarkable quality, their radiant colours perfectly preserved by the albums in which they were kept. The first volume in a series on erotic prints by famous Japanese woodblock-print artists, this book contains a detailed general introduction to the genre of shunga. In addition to a description of the historical and cultural settings of the prints, it focuses in particular on the locations and interiors where the erotic action takes place.
Japanese Paintings 1700-1950
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Japan has a long and rich tradition of using animal imagery in works of art. A Brush with Animals. Japanese Painting 1700-1950 gives an overview of Japanese animal painting, covering some 250 years, with an emphasis on works by artists of the naturalistic Shijô School. It illustrates the wonderful variety of animals that figure in Japanese iconography, including the 12 animals of the zodiac and many mythological creatures. The reader is thus taken on a tour through the animal kingdom, which is profusely illustrated with no less than 300 colour images. A selection of essays explains in great detail the stories and legends behind the animal imagery and provides background information on the practical aspects and social context of Japanese hanging scroll paintings. A useful tool for the collector and a delight for anyone sensitive to the beauty of Japanese art.
A Brush with Animals was selected from collections of members of the Society for Japanese Arts (private and museum collections), to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Society. Many of the paintings are published here for the first time.
Japanese Portrait Prints from the Toledo Museum of Art
Shin-hanga, literally meaning ‘new prints’, was the name given to a Japanese print artists’ movement in the early years of the twentieth century. It sought to revive the traditional style of Ukiyo-e woodblock prints of the Edo period (1603-1868). The connection between shin-hanga and the Toledo Museum of Art began when Yoshida Hiroshi, one of the leaders of the movement, and his artist wife met J. Arthur MacLean and Dorothy Blair, at that time connected to the John Herron Art Museum in Indianapolis. When Mr. MacLean and Miss Blair established Toledo’s Asian Art Department in 1927-28, they decided to collaborate with their friends the Yoshidas on two exhibitions of modern Japanese prints, which took place in 1930 and 1936. This book accompanies the Museum’s exhibition, Strong Women, Beautiful Men, which explores the concept of the human form in Japanese woodblock prints. Many of the works in the extensive Toledo collection deal with the genre of popular figures, such as Kabuki actors in famous roles and bijin-ga, images of beautiful women.

Contents:
• Foreword - Don Bacigalupi, Director
• Modern Japanese Prints in Toledo - Carolyn M. Putney, Curator of Asian Art
• The Changing Faces of Japanese Woodblock Prints - Laura J. Mueller
• Catalogue of Plates (50, each with brief text)
• Artist Biographies; Glossary; Brief Checklist of Exhibition; Selected Bibliography; Concordance by Accession Number; Index.

Artists: Nishikawa Sukenobu, Torii Kyomasu II, Torii Kiyonobu II, Suzuki Harunobu, Ippitsusai Buncho, Torii Kiyonaga, Katsukawa Shunko, Katsukawa Shun’ei, Kitagawa Utamaro, Kikugawa Eizan, Katsushika Taito II, Katsushika Hokusai, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Keisai Eisen, Kunisada (Toyokuni III), Toyohara Kunichika, Mizuno Toshikata, Migita Toshihide, Hashiguchi Goyo, Yoshikawa Kanpo, Ito Shinsui, Yamamura Toyonari, Miki Suizan, Natori Shunsen, Yoshida Hiroshi.
A courtesan's day in the carefree atmosphere of the famous pleasure quarter the Yoshiwara in Edo (present-day Tokyo) was carefully planned to an hourly schedule. This sequence of 12 and later 24 hours proved a convenient device for Japanese print artists and their publishers when devising sets of prints showing favourite beauties of the day engaged in daily activities.
In this second volume of Hotei Publishing's Famous Japanese Prints Series, three sets centred on the theme of the hours of the clock in the pleasure quarters are discussed in detail:
• Kitagawa Utamaro's The Twelve Hours of the 'Green Houses' (Seirō jūnitoki, c. 1794)
• Tsukioka Yoshitoshi's Twenty-four Hours in Shinbashi and Yanagibashi (Shinryū nijūyoji, 1880-81)
• Toyohara Kunichika's Scenes of the Twenty-four Hours, A Prictorial Trope (Mitate chūya nijūyoji, 1890-91)
A contextual and visual analysis of these works by the authors provides the reader with an insight into the broader cultural and artistic milieu of the early and later nineteenth century.
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This publication is a comprehensive guide dealing specifically with important collections of publicly available Japanese art in the UK. It identifies the wide range of Japanese art collections nationwide, making them known and accessible to all those interested in Japan’s unique art and culture.
The guide contains cross-references in the index to town, county, type of holding, etc., and regional maps. Color and black and white photographs of key objects from the collections are included.