Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Hauptsprache: English x
  • Nach Ebene eingrenzen: Titles x
  • Status: Published x
Clear All
Volume Editors: and
There are few, if any, other educational philosophers that have left their mark internationally as John Dewey has. Author of 40 books and no less than 700 articles that appeared in over 140 journals, Dewey’s work has been translated into at least 35 languages. His landmark Democracy and Education – published over a century ago in 1916 – is one of the most cited educational texts ever.

Dewey has inspired educators and provoked controversies in his day, and still does so today. This volume sets out to engage with Dewey’s educational thought, especially as it relates to its circulation in the countries bordering on the Mediterranean. Authors consider his enduring influence, and reflect on the ‘push’ and ‘pull’ forces that served to anchor progressivism, in its multiple manifestations, in the region. The notion of a unidirectional force – personified by Dewey – that is somehow absorbed by the ‘receiving’ country is problematised by most if not all chapters in this volume. Rather, contributors carefully show how context affects a process marked by active appropriation, re-interpretation, adaptation, as well as resistance.

Sometimes a vibrant presence that still needs to be reckoned with, at other times a ghostly figure nevertheless serving to sustain democratic aspirations in and through education, Dewey and his message resonate, challenge, and demand a response.
In Ecocritical Perspectives in Teacher Education, the editors share a collection of chapters from diverse critical scholars in teacher education.

Teachers, and their students, are faced with demands that require teacher educators to work toward better preparing them to teach in a changed world—a world where diversity, human rights, sustainability, and democracy must be paramount. This text calls together teacher educators who address the complex ways that social and environmental injustices—like racism, sexism, classism, ableism, and speciesism—weave together to produce dangerous conditions for all life. The volume shares with readers a glimpse into alternatives possible for teaching that are situational, local, and in support of social justice and sustainability.

Contributors are: Marissa E. Bellino, Melissa Bradford, Greer Burroughs, Nataly Chesky, Brandon Edwards-Schuth, Alison Happel-Parkins, Kevin Holohan, Agnes C. Krynski, John Lupinacci, Emilia Maertens, Rebecca Martusewicz, Emma McMain, Michio Okamura, Clayton Pierce, Meneka Repka, Graham B. Slater, Silvia Patricia Solís, JT Torres, Rita Turner, Robert G. Unzueta and Mark Wolfmeyer.
Volume Editor:
In this book, 31 international academics explore the concepts of gifted, talented, creative and dissimilar learners as they apply in both school and tertiary education. Problem-based learning, alternative educational settings and meaningful feedback for gifted, talented and high potential learners, teachers’ views on creative pedagogies, learning analytics for dissimilar learners, eMaking for learners with an intellectual disability, capabilities-led programs, learner agency and inclusive practices in mathematics education, form a unique nexus of theory, research and approaches being presented by the authors.

These chapters and the totality of this book represent efforts to get a glimpse into the future of the education of the gifted, talented, creative and dissimilar learners. If nothing else, this book underlines the value of powerful approaches and tools for educating 21st-century school learners as well as tertiary learners in the context of rapidly evolving global educational reforms.

Contributors are: Fatma Nur Aktaş, Tasos Barkatsas, Damian Blake, Antonios Bouras, Grant Cooper, Yüksel Dede, Kirsten Ellis, Zara Ersozlu, Aleryk Fricker, Vasilis Gialamas, Andrew Gilbert, Wendy Goff, Anne K. Horak, Gasangusein I. Ibragimov, Jennifer Jolly, Aliya A. Kalimullina, Gillian Kidman, Konstantinos Lavidas, Huk-Yuen Law, Sandra McKechnie, Patricia McLaughlin, Juanjo Mena, Anastasia Papadopoulou, Angela Rogers, Aimé Sacrez, Rachel Sheffield, Stefan Schutt, Hazel Tan, Kok-Sing Tang, Roza A. Valeeva and Wanty Widjaja.
Volume Editors: and
This volume presents a critical discussion that brings contemporary academic debate about ‘southern theory’ to Global Citizenship Education (GCE). It situates the discussion around GCE in the Global South within a critical and post-colonial paradigm informed by the values and knowledge of critical pedagogy ingrained in social justice.

Global Citizenship Education in the Global South invites the reader into chapters written by educators exploring, analysing, and celebrating ideas and concepts on GCE in the Global South. The book is presented as a pedagogical tool for discussion that invites educators to reflect critically on the possible origins and implications of GCE discourses they are exposed to.

The book is designed with the intent to contribute towards the possibility of imagining a 'yet-to-come' critical-transformative and post-colonial and value-creating GCE curriculum beyond a westernised, market-oriented and apolitical practices towards a more sustainable paradigm based on principles of mutuality and reciprocity.
Technology-mediated learning is the reality of this digital age. Although a major disruptor, the global pandemic inspired innovation and collaboration to advance 21st century teaching and learning. Thus, leaders must understand the dynamics and complexities of large-scale technology implementations to realize educational gains. This includes the dynamics of procurement, instructional design, and the challenges from inadequate network security, internet and technology access to support faculty and learners.

Through storytelling and narrative case studies, Large-Scale Technology Implementation Stories to Inspire Change provides evidence-based practices, practical strategies, and inclusive excellence considerations to any current or aspiring school leader. The diverse perspectives of institutional and industry leaders help school leaders discover opportunities resulting in more effective processes, partnerships, and technologies for engaging instruction and lasting change.
An Introduction to a Phenomenological Approach to the Philosophical Study of Education
Author:
Is there room for philosophy in educational research? Where is phenomenology before and beyond its uses and abuses in the applied and social sciences? How are phenomenology and philosophy of education related? What are the methods of phenomenology within the field of philosophy of education? These talks to educational scholars and researchers respond to these questions and make an appeal for the place of philosophy within educational research and the tradition of phenomenology within philosophy of education. Across a broad genealogy of thought, with frequent substitutions and autobiographical confessions, these lectures work from and towards a simple article of faith: philosophy and education are not so different.
Author:
The politics of racism have returned with a bang. What was once a whisper is now a roar in the wake of public outrage over charges of police racism that claimed the lives of racialized minorities and Indigenous peoples. Yet confusion and uncertainty unsettle the challenge of clarifying the nature and scope of racism in general, systemic racism in particular, resulting in a glaring disconnect between public perceptions and lived experiences. Reckoning with Racism is themed around the prospect of problematizing the idea of racism as articulated, understood, and debated in response to new realities, emergent demands, and contested dynamics. A profoundly new racism world is evolving, one so fundamentally different from the iterations of the past, as to trigger a foundational shift in reconceptualizing how see, think and talk about and act on racism. Changing the conversation on racism must also acknowledge its uncanny knack of reinventing itself, while intersecting with other axes of identity and differentiation to amplify the inequalities of exclusion.
Volume Editor:
The use of images in education is expanding, but clear and comprehensive guidelines on how to carry out visual activities with students of a variety of fields are difficult to find. With the case studies from Finland, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, Japan, Poland, Turkey and the United States, contributors to this volume offer detailed reflections on the pedagogical role of using images in higher education. Examples include drawing, collage making, video production, object-based learning, photography projects, and many more. The book constructs a solid argument for the further development of visual pedagogies in higher education, highlighting the need to support students in advancing their visual competency as it has become fundamental to command in everyday life and professional contexts.

Contributors are: Gyuzel Gadelshina, Tad Hara, Joanna Kędra, McKenzie Lloyd-Smith, Gary McLeod, Olivia Meehan, Marianna Michałowska, Iryna Molodecky, Pınar Nuhoğlu Kibar, Paul Richter, Karen F. Tardrew, Rob Wilson and Rasa Žakevičiūtė.
Scholarship on artistic output during second wave feminism (SWF) primarily reflects art-genres such as visual art, performance art, literature, and poetry. In The Women’s Music Movement: Music as Feminist Praxis, 1973–1980, Paul Ambrose Shaw III contends the women’s music movement (WMM) was a vibrant locus of feminist activity during SWF but received comparatively less scholarly attention. Specifically, Shaw conducts a content analysis of five songs recorded between 1973 and 1980. As such, he draws on musical elements and structures, poetic and lyrical devices, personal insights from the artists, and feminist theory to explore the following important questions: What can we learn about second wave feminist movement through the lens of the women’s music movement? Was the women’s music movement, as some scholars and activists assert, simply a cultural and lifestyle movement, or an impactful locus of feminist praxis? Through a detailed analysis of five songs recorded by stalwarts of WMM—Meg Christian, Cris Williamson, Ferron, Holly Near, and Linda Tillery—Shaw argues for the importance of WMM as a vibrant center of struggle, growth, and creativity that serves as a model for modern social movement cultural activity.