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Course adoption for this paperback is available when ordering 8 or more copies at 52 euro per copy, free shipping and one invoice. Please contact Liesbeth Hugenholtz at hugenholtz@brill.com

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Die dritte, mehrbändige Auflage des Hebräischen und Aramäischen Lexikons zum Alten Testament (HALAT) von Koehler & Baumgartner erschien zwischen 1967 und 1995. Das Werk behandelt sämtliche Lexeme aus der Hebräischen Bibel, bezieht aber auch außerbiblische Belege und antike Übersetzungen ein und bietet zudem oft ausführliche Sachdiskussionen und umfangreiche Angaben zu (seinerzeit aktueller) Fachliteratur.

Die hier vorliegende Konzise und aktualisierte Ausgabe des Hebräischen und Aramäischen Lexikons (KAHAL) basiert auf HALAT, konzentriert sich aber ganz auf die lexikographische Behandlung der biblischen Lexeme. Die etymologischen Einträge sind auf dem Stand der gegenwärtigen Semitistik neu erarbeitet. Eigennamen werden ohne Etymologie, aber in Umschrift aufgeführt.

Mit KAHAL wird Fachleuten wie Studierenden der Theologie und benachbarter Disziplinen ein handliches und aufdatiertes Hilfsmittel zum Studium der Hebräischen Bibel an die Hand gegeben.

Verantwortlich für die Etymologien sind folgende Wissenschaftler:
Prof. Dr. Manfried Dietrich (Universität Münster),
Juniorprofessor Dr. des. Viktor Golinets (Universität Basel/Hochschule für Jüdische Studien Heidelberg),
Prof. Dr. Regine Hunziker-Rodewald (Université de Strasbourg),
Dr. Dirk Schwiderski (Universität Heidelberg).


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The third edition of Hebräisches und Aramäisches Lexikon zum Alten Testament (HALAT) by Koehler & Baumgartner appeared in a series of fascicles between 1967 and 1995. It deals with the lexemes of the whole Hebrew Bible, and includes citations from extra-biblical sources and the ancient versions as well as much discussion of the secondary literature then available.

The Konzise und aktualisierte Ausgabe des Hebräischen und Aramäischen Lexikons (KAHAL) is based on HALAT but it focuses on the lexicographic treatment of the biblical lexemes. The etymological material has been revised to reflect the current status of studies in comparative Semitic philology. Proper names are all now transcribed but without any proposed etymologies.

KAHAL offers scholars and students of the Hebrew Bible and theology a handy and up-to-date work of reference.

The following scholars are responsible for the etymologies:
Prof. Dr. Manfried Dietrich (Universität Münster),
Juniorprofessor Dr. des. Viktor Golinets (Universität Basel/Hochschule für Jüdische Studien Heidelberg),
Prof. Dr. Regine Hunziker-Rodewald (Université de Strasbourg),
Dr. Dirk Schwiderski (Universität Heidelberg).

A hundred years after A. Schweitzer's Von Reimarus zu Wrede, the study of the historical Jesus is again experiencing a renaissance. Ongoing since the beginning of the 1980's, this renaissance has produced an abundance of Jesus studies that also display a welcome diversity of methods, approaches and hypotheses. The Handbook of the Study of the Historical Jesus is designed to handle this diversity and abundance. Drawing from first-class scholarship throughout the world, the four large volumes of the Handbook offer a unique assembly of leading experts presenting their approaches to the historical Jesus, as well as a thought-out compilation of original studies on a large variety of topics pertaining to Jesus research and adjacent areas.
Author: Ian Wilson
This essay offers an introduction to select disciplinary developments in the study of history and in historical study of the Hebrew Bible. It focuses first and foremost on “cultural history,” a broad category defined by nineteenth- and twentieth-century developments in anthropology and sociology, literary theory and linguistics, and other fields of study. The first part of the essay comments on developments since the so-called “linguistic turn,” highlighting some key works on culture, narrative, and memory, in order to establish a contemporary historical approach to biblical studies. It then turns to questions of the Hebrew Bible’s usefulness for historical study, and highlights studies of King David and the Davidic polity in ancient Israel/Judah, to show how scholars of the Bible have done historical work in recent years. And finally, it provides a case study of the book of Joshua, demonstrating how historians can utilize biblical texts as sources for cultural history.
Interchange between anthropology and biblical scholarship began because of perceived similarities between “simpler” societies and practices appearing in the Hebrew Bible. After some disengagement when anthropologists turned mainly to ethnographic fieldwork, new cross-disciplinary possibilities opened up when structuralism emerged in anthropology. Ritual and mythology were major topics receiving attention, and some biblical scholars partially adopted structuralist methods. In addition, anthropological research extended to complex societies and also had an impact upon historical studies. Modes of interpretation developed that reflected holistic perspectives along with a sensibility to ethnographic detail. This essay illustrates these trends in regard to rituals and to notions of purity in the Hebrew Bible, as well as to the place of literacy in Israelite society and culture. After discussing these themes, three examples of structuralist-inspired analysis are presented which in different ways take into account historical and literacy-based facets of the Bible.
Author: Xiaoli Yang
In A Dialogue between Haizi’s Poetry and the Gospel of Luke Xiaoli Yang offers a conversation between the Chinese soul-searching found in Haizi’s (1964–1989) poetry and the gospel of Jesus Christ through Luke’s testimony. It creates a unique contextual poetic lens that appreciates a generation of the Chinese homecoming journey through Haizi’s poetry, and explores its relationship with Jesus Christ. As the dialogical journey, it names four stages of homecoming—roots, vision, journey and arrival. By taking an interdisciplinary approach—literary study, inter-cultural dialogue and comparative theology, Xiaoli Yang convincingly demonstrates that the common language between the poet Haizi and the Lukan Jesus provides a crucial and rich source of data for an ongoing table conversation between culture and faith.
Examining the legacies of European imperialism, Steed Vernyl Davidson traces how the Bible reflects strong affinities with empire and provides on-going justifications for empire and concentrations of power. Writing/Reading the Bible in Postcolonial Perspective traces the evolution of the Bible from its production in empires of antiquity to its supportive role in the development of modern imperialism. The work also engages the ambiguities of the Bible as anti-imperial tool. Set within an examination of postcolonial studies as a revolutionary and revisionary discourse, this work presses for a more vigorous postcolonializing of the Bible in Biblical Studies. A description of the contemporary features and manifestation of empire forms the context within which further exploration of postcolonial biblical critical work can take place. Following an assessment of previous work in the field, the challenges of intersectional work with queer studies, terrorism studies, technology, and ecological studies are laid out as future tasks
This work provides a brief introduction to feminist interpretation of scripture. Feminist interpretation is first grounded in feminism as an intellectual and political movement. Next, this introduction briefly recounts the origins of feminist readings of the Bible with attention to both early readings and the beginnings of feminist biblical scholarship in the academy. Feminist biblical scholarship is not a single methodology, but rather an approach that can shape any reading method. As a discipline, it began with literary-critical readings (especially of the Hebrew Bible) but soon also broached questions of women’s history (especially in the New Testament and Christian origins). Since these first forays, feminist interpretation has influenced almost every type of biblical scholarship. The third section of this essay, then, looks at gender archaeology, feminist poststructuralism and postcolonial readings, and newer approaches informed by gender and queer theory. Finally, it ends by examining feminist readings of Eve.
Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World
Author: Gil Renberg
Where Dreams May Come was the winner of the 2018 Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit, awarded by the Society for Classical Studies.

In this book, Gil H. Renberg examines the ancient religious phenomenon of “incubation", the ritual of sleeping at a divinity’s sanctuary in order to obtain a prophetic or therapeutic dream. Most prominently associated with the Panhellenic healing god Asklepios, incubation was also practiced at the cult sites of numerous other divinities throughout the Greek world, but it is first known from ancient Near Eastern sources and was established in Pharaonic Egypt by the time of the Macedonian conquest; later, Christian worship came to include similar practices. Renberg’s exhaustive study represents the first attempt to collect and analyze the evidence for incubation from Sumerian to Byzantine and Merovingian times, thus making an important contribution to religious history.

This set consists of two books.
In The Sense of Quoting, Odell-Scott argues that the neutral continuous script of ancient manuscripts of the Greek New Testament composed with no punctuation and no spacing provided readers discretionary authority to determine and assess the status of phrases as they articulate a cohesive and coherent reading of the script. The variety of reading renditions each differently scored with punctuation supported the production of quotations. These cultivated and harvested quotes while useful for authorizing sectarian discourse, rarely convey the sense of the phrase in the continuous script. Augustine’s work on punctuating the scriptures in service to the production of plainer quotable passages in support of the rule of faith is addressed. Odell-Scott’s textual analysis of a plainer quotable passage at verse 7:1b concerning male celibacy supports his thesis that plainer passages are the product of interpretative scoring of the script in service to discursive endeavours. To quote is often to misquote.
Komposition und Theologie von Josua 1–5
For this book the author has received THE MANFRED LAUTENSCHLAEGER AWARD FOR THEOLOGICAL PROMISE 2015

Kein Auszug ohne Einzug – erst mit dem Eisodus in das verheißene Land kommt der Exodus aus Ägypten an sein Ziel. Es verwundert daher nicht, dass der erste Teil des Josuabuches in den Kapiteln 1–5, in dem dieser Einzug dargestellt wird, vielfältige literarische Bezüge zur Exodusüberlieferung im Pentateuch aufweist. Wie aber sind diese Bezüge zu erklären, als intratextuelle Bindeglieder ein und desselben Werkes oder als intertextuelle Bezugnahmen? Mit dem Aufweis einer sukzessiven Ausgestaltung der Ereignisse beim Eisodus nach dem Vorbild des Exodus bietet die vorliegende Untersuchung der Komposition und Theologie von Josua 1–5 in den drei überlieferten Ausgaben des Josuabuches (MT, LXX, Qumran) Antworten auf alte, angesichts der gegenwärtigen Debatte um Hexateuch und Deuteronomistisches Geschichtswerk hochaktuelle Fragen der Forschung.

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The Exodus from Egypt is perfect only with the Eisodus into the Promised Land. It does not come as a surprise, therefore, that the first part of the Book of Joshua, which is dedicated to the entry into the land, features a variety of literary affinities to the Exodus tradition as found in the Pentateuch. But how are these affinities to be explained? Do they testify to an original literary work which covered both Exodus and Conquest, or do they rather betray subsequent connections through intertextual references? Analyzing the composition and theology of Joshua 1–5 in the three extant versions of the book (MT, LXX, Qumran), the present study contributes to the current debate of the Pentateuch, Hexateuch, and Deuteronomistic History.