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From Antiquity to Islam in the Mediterranean and Near East (6th-10th Century)
Authority and Control in the Countryside looks at the economic, religious, political and cultural instruments that local and regional powers in the late antique to early medieval Mediterranean and Near East used to manage their rural hinterlands. Measures of direct control – land ownership, judicial systems, garrisons and fortifications, religious and administrative appointments, taxes and regulation – and indirect control – monuments and landmarks, cultural styles and artistic models, intellectual and religious influence, and economic and bureaucratic standard-setting – are examined to reconstruct the various means by which authority was asserted over the countryside. Unified by its thematic and spatial focus, this book offers an array of interdisciplinary approaches, allowing for important comparisons across a wide but connected geographical area in the transition from the Sasanian and Roman to the Islamic period.

Contributors: Arezou Azad and Hugh Kennedy, Sobhi Bouderbala, Michele Campopiano, Alain Delattre, Jessica Ehinger, Simon Ford, James Howard-Johnston, Elif Keser-Kayaalp, Marie Legendre, Javier Martínez Jiménez, Harry Munt, Annliese Nef and Vivien Prigent, Marion Rivoal and Marie-Odile Rousset, Gesa Schenke, Petra Sijpesteijn, Peter Verkinderen, Luke Yarbrough, Khaled Younes.
Editor: Angus Phillips
Logos – the international journal of the publishing community – celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2015. Since its first publication it has gained a reputation for publishing insightful and clear-headed articles about publishing, and this tradition continues to the present day, with the addition in recent years of academic articles reflecting the growth in the discipline of publishing studies.

The present collection provides the opportunity to mark this milestone in the journal’s history by reprinting over thirty articles in book form. The selection has been made with a view to representing the full span of the life of the journal, with a good spread across the years of publication from 1990 onwards. The articles selected are ones that have stood the test of time and have something interesting to say. There is broad international coverage, from Argentina to China, from Iran to Kenya, and a wide selection of topics including publishing, bookselling, libraries, censorship, and book history. The new introduction, written by the journal’s editor-in-chief, Angus Phillips, places the articles in perspective, highlighting their currency and foresight.

The volume will be essential reading for both industry professionals and students of book history and publishing studies.

Featured articles are by Maarten Aascher, Marc Aronson, Diana Athill, Betty Ballantine, Michael Bhaskar, Marie-Franҫoise Cachin and Sylvie Ducas-Spaes, Henry Chakava, John Curtis, Tomás Eloy Martínez, Joseph J. Esposito, Richard Fisher, Gordon Graham, Arash Hejazi, Eva Hemmungs Wirtén, Albert Henderson, Philip Jarvis and Sue Thomson, Eva Kneissl, Miha Kovač and Rüdiger Wischenbart, Michael Krüger, Laura J. Miller, Ian Norrie, Angus Phillips, Frances Pinter, Oliviero Ponte di Pino, Tatjana Praštalo, Tim Rix, Tom Rosenthal, Jerome Rubin, John Ryden, Tim Waterstone, and Francis Whitehead.

Author: Angela Nuovo
This work offers the first English-language survey of the book industry in Renaissance Italy. Whereas traditional accounts of the book in the Renaissance celebrate authors and literary achievement, this study examines the nuts and bolts of a rapidly expanding trade that built on existing economic practices while developing new mechanisms in response to political and religious realities. Approaching the book trade from the perspective of its publishers and booksellers, this archive-based account ranges across family ambitions and warehouse fires to publishers' petitions and convivial bookshop conversation. In the process it constructs a nuanced picture of trading networks, production, and the distribution and sale of printed books, a profitable but capricious commodity.

Originally published in Italian as Il commercio librario nell’Italia del Rinascimento (Milan: Franco Angeli, 1998; second, revised ed., 2003), this present English translation has not only been updated but has also been deeply revised and augmented.
Africa and the Americas 1500 - 1900
Editors: Adrien Delmas and Nigel Penn
Recent developments in the cultural history of written culture have omitted the specificity of practices relative to writing that were anchored in colonial contexts. The circulation of manuscripts and books between different continents played a key role in the process of the first globalization from the 16th century onwards. While the European colonial organization mobilised several forms of writing and tried to control the circulation and reception of this material, the very function and meaning of written culture was recreated by the introduction and appropriation of written culture into societies without alphabetical forms of writing. This book explores the extent to which the control over the materiality of writing has shaped the numerous and complex processes of cultural exchange during the early modern period.
Proceedings of the 'Groninger Codicologendagen' in Friesland, 2002
Volume 3 of the Boekhistorische Reeks contains the proceedings of the ‘Groninger Codicologendagen in Friesland’, the quadrennial conference on Netherlandish manuscript studies, which in 2002 was held at the Fryske Akademy in Leewarden.
The rich contents of this book reflect the two major conference themes, Books and Teaching, and the Art of Manuscript Illumination. International scholars in these fields investigate both subjects from various angles.
Papers included in the first section offer glimpses of medieval school life, the role of schoolboys in the production of manuscripts and printed books, the use of books by medieval surgeons, the pecia-system to produce manuscripts, and the importance of manuscripts for early modern scholarship.
In the second section the focus is on the state of research and new inquiries in Netherlandish manuscript illumination. Miniatures, border decoration, scribes and workshop practices are the subjects of studies ranging from the Moerdrecht Masters, active in the second quarter of the fifteenth century, to Ghent-Bruges illuminators in the beginning of the sixteenth century, and from mass-produced books of hours to luxurious, secular manuscripts made for members of the Bourgundian court.
In the third part some current book-historical projects are presented, which cover a broad range of important research tools that are now available through the Internet, both for specialists as well as book lovers.