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Author: Frank Cranmer
In Religion and belief in United Kingdom employment law, Frank Cranmer discusses the relationships between religion and employment in the wider context. It is a particularly complex area of law that touches on a wide variety of issues, ranging from the basic question, ‘exactly what constitutes a “religion” or “belief”?’ to ‘what kinds of religious dress do my employees have a right to wear to work?’ and ‘what religious standards – if any – can I, as an employer, demand of my employees?’.

The purpose of the study is to provide an overview of some of the current issues and problems surrounding the law relating to employment by religious organisations and the manifestation of religion in the workplace. Because the complexity of the law means that individual outcomes in disputed cases are often depend heavily on the facts, it does so primarily by examining recent case-law.
Work and Compulsion after Chattel Slavery
On Coerced Labor focuses on those forms of labor relations that have been overshadowed by the “extreme” categories (wage labor and chattel slavery) in the historiography. It covers types of work lying between what the law defines as “free labor” and “slavery.” The frame of reference is the observation that although chattel slavery has largely been abolished in the course of the past two centuries, other forms of coerced labor have persisted in most parts of the world. While most nations have increasingly condemned the continued existence of slavery and the slave trade, they have tolerated labor relationships that involve violent control, economic exploitation through the appropriation of labor power, restriction of workers’ freedom of movement, and fraudulent debt obligations.

Contributors are: Lisa Carstensen, Christian G. De Vito, Justin F. Jackson, Christine Molfenter, David Palmer, Nicola Pizzolato, Luis F.B. Plascencia, Magaly Rodríguez García, Kelvin Santiago-Valles, Nicole J. Siller, Marcel van der Linden, Sven Van Melkebeke.
Travelling Models offers a theoretical concept for comparative research on conflict management in Africa in processes of globalization: how is change in one place related to developments in other places? Why are certain issues that are important in one place taken up in other places, while others are not? The authors examine how the travel of models enact changes, particularly in African conflict situations, most often in unexpected ways. They look at what happens when a model has been put into practice at a conflict site, and they pay attention to the forms of social (re-)ordering resulting from this process. The authors look, among others, at conflict managing models of power- and revenue sharing, mediation, freedom of expression, disaster management, community involvement and workshopping.

Contributors are: Andrea Behrends, Lydie Cabane, Veronika Fuest, Dejene Gemechu, Mutasim Bashir Ali Hadi, Remadji Hoinathy, Mario Krämer, Sung-Joon Park, Tinashe Pfigu, Richard Rottenburg, Sylvanus Spencer and Kees van der Waal.

The Introduction of this volume is being offered in Open Access