Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 26 items for :

  • Brill | Sense x
  • Status (Books): Not Yet Published x
Clear All
Author: Alexis Kokkos
We live in a socio-cultural reality which is dominated by an entrepreneurial and instrumental rationality, as well as by a discriminative and populist mentality. Questioning the validity of taken-for-granted sovereign perspectives is thus of vital importance. Our contact with art can serve as a pathway through which we might be empowered to identify false life values and develop the disposition and ability to challenge them.

The learning potential of aesthetic experience is, however, barely exploited within educational systems. In addition, although major scholars have contributed to a deeper understanding of the liberating dimension of processing important artworks, there has been surprisingly little discussion in the relevant literature focusing on educational practice.

Exploring Art for Perspective Transformation provides a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of theoretical views pertaining to the emancipatory process of exploring art. Moreover, it presents the educational method Transformative Learning through Aesthetic Experience (TLAE), with reference to particular examples of implementation. TLAE is addressed to adult educators and school teachers regardless of the subject they teach and their theoretical background on aesthetics. It involves engaging learners in exploring works from fine arts, literature, theatre, cinema and music with a view to promoting critical reflection on one’s potentially problematic perspectives.
This volume addresses a gap in previous research and to explore Nordic textbooks chronologically and empirically from the Protestant Reformation to our present time. The chapters are written by scholars from universities in Finland, Denmark, Sweden and Norway, countries that distinguish themselves for a rich tradition of textbook research. The authors represent different academic traditions and use a wide range of scholarly methods and perspectives. The overall objective is to highlight how textbooks reflect national educational policies and legislation. The various chapters cast light on everyday life in school and demonstrate how textbooks have contributed to nation-building and to strengthening the nations’ core values and other major political projects.

Contributors are: Karl Christian Alvestad, Norunn Askeland, Kjell Lars Berge, Peter Bernhardsson, Kerstin Bornholdt, Mads B. Claudi, Henrik Edgren, Morten Fink-Jensen, Stig Toke Gissel, Thomas Illum Hansen, Pirjo Hiidenmaa, Marthe Hommerstad, Axel Hörstedt, Kari-Anne Jørgensen-Vittersø, Tujia Laine, Esbjörn Larsson, Ragnhild Elisabeth Lund, Christina Matthiesen, Eva Maagerø, Tuva Skjelbred Nodeland, Kari H. Nordberg, Merethe Roos, Henriette Hogga Siljan, Johan Laurits Tønnesson and Janne Varjo.
A Guidebook of Practices, Claims, Issues, and Implications
In this volume, the author offers an exploratory analysis of the history of homeschooling in the United States, current curricular practices, religious and political rationales for homeschooling, a critique of the claims by homeschooling advocates that the practice leads to greater efficiency and effectiveness, and what homeschooling and individualistic-oriented approaches mean for society.

Teaching the next generation at home is, with little doubt, the oldest form of educating children. Yet, this simplistic understanding of “homeschooling” does not adequately capture the growth of homeschooling as a practice in the 21st century nor is it a widely accessible form of “school choice” for most families. While many parents keep their children out of formal schooling – public and private – for myriad reasons, what is clear is that homeschooling is the epitome of a conceiving of education as an individualistic good – a commodity – that can, or should, be done outside of a conception of the common good, a reasonable understanding of teaching as a profession, and the elevation of ideological echo chambers of information which can have deleterious impacts on the students who are homeschooled and society, broadly.
Jean-François Lyotard, Pedagogy, Thought
Author: Derek R. Ford
In the first monograph on Lyotard and education, Derek R. Ford approaches Lyotard’s thought as pedagogical in itself. The result is a novel, soft, and accessible study of Lyotard organized around two inhuman educations: that of “the system” and that of “the human.” The former enforces an interminable process of development, dialogue and exchange, while the latter finds its force in the mute, secret, opaque, and inarticulable.

Threading together a range of Lyotard’s work through four pedagogical processes—reading, writing, voicing, and listening—the author insists on the distinct educational logics that can uphold or interrupt different ways of being-together in the world, touching on a range of topics from literacy and aesthetics to time and political-economy. While Inhuman Educations can serve as an introduction to Lyotard’s philosophy, it also constitutes a singular, provocative, and fresh take on his thought.
Policy and Practice in Multilingual Education Based on Non-Dominant Languages
This second volume of Language Issues in Comparative Education, following the tradition of the first, introduces the state of the field, re-establishes core terminology and concepts, and situates the chapters in terms of their contributions to multilingual education based on non-dominant languages. The first group of chapters examines language-in-education policy change, applying an innovative framework to analyze diverse contexts including Mozambique, Estonia and the Philippines. The next group of chapters describes activities designed to implement multilingual education. Using examples from Chad, Ethiopia, Kenya and Nepal, they explore progress in teacher professional development and elaboration of materials for literacy and learning through non-dominant languages. Some highlight new areas of the field, attending to speakers of non-dominant languages other than the ones chosen for instruction, and to the urgent multilingual needs of refugee learners. The final group of chapters presents strategies for research and advocacy, illustrated with examples from DR Congo, Uganda and India. Taken together, these contributions form a cohesive body of work that takes stock of advances in multilingual education and moves the field forward.

The authors and editors share a common commitment to comparativism in their methods and analysis, and aim to contribute to a more inclusive and multilingual education for all.
Curriculum studies is at the core of the educational endeavour and informs what happens in every educational institution. As a result of its criticality or primacy, every educational practitioner appears to claim expertise in curriculum matters and what direction the field should take. In Africa, the curriculum practitioner has been given little or no space to theorise and orient the future of the field in Africa. Instead, European, and American curriculum theorisers have been allowed to exert a marked influence on the nature and direction of African theoretical and philosophical underpinnings. This situation raises fundamental questions about the future of education in Africa and this volume explores and answers these questions relating to curriculum theory, theorising and the theoriser by breaking traditions and experimenting on alternative approaches and pathways.

Contributors are: Aruna Ankiah-Gangadeen, Lynn Biggs, Eunice Champion, Taryn Isaacs De Vega, Kehdinga George Fomunyam, Nadaraj Govender, Angela James, Simon Bheki Khoza, NomaChina Kubashe, Nehemiah Latolla, Jacqui Lück, Dumisa Celumusa Mabuza, Simeon Maile, Suriamurthee Maistry, Makhulu A. Makumane, Emily Ndlovu Mangwaya, Zvisinei Moyo, Cedric Bheki Mpungose, Pascal Nadal, Blanche Ntombizodwa Ndlovu, Chris Ndlovu, Nellie Ngcongo-James, Dee (Deirdre) Pratt, Mukhtar Raban, Nolundi Radana, Makhosazana Edith Shoba, Mahlapahlapana Themane, Molaodi Tshelane, and Denise Zinn.
Learning concepts is a real challenge for learners because of the abstract nature of concepts. This holds particularly true for concepts in science and technology education where learning concepts by doing design activities is potentially a powerful way to overcome that learning barrier. Much depends, however, on the role of the teacher.

Design-Based Concept Learning in Science and Technology Education brings together contributions from researchers that have investigated what conditions need to be fulfilled to make design-based education work. The chapters contain studies from a variety of topics and concepts in science and technology education. So far, studies on design-based learning have been published in a variety of journals, but never before were the outcomes of those studies brought together in one volume. Now an overview of insights about design-based concept learning is presented with expectations about future directions and trends.
This book focuses on reflective writing, guiding teachers to recognize their potential as professional leaders. The shift to online and blended learning models now favored in education encourages a broader understanding of leadership, particularly its growing relevance to teachers. These models, combined with reflective writing, foster flexible, inclusive teacher learning that responds to each teacher’s strengths, can be used individually and collaboratively to develop teachers as leaders inside and outside the classroom who are critically involved in creating their own professional learning environments. The authors examine leadership in a global range of teaching contexts, each chapter raising diverse issues for teachers aspiring to be leaders in this post-COVID world.
This diverse and global collection of scholars, educators, and activists presents a panorama of perspectives on media education and democracy in a digital age. Drawing upon projects in both the formal and non-formal education spheres, the authors contribute towards conceptualizing, developing, cultivating, building and elaborating a more respectful, robust and critically-engaged democracy. Given the challenges our world faces, it may seem that small projects, programs and initiatives offer just a salve to broader social and political dynamics but these are the types of contestatory spaces, openings and initiatives that enable participatory democracy. This book provides a space for experimentation and dialogue, and a platform for projects and initiatives that challenge or supplement the learning offered by traditional forms of education. The Foreword is written by Divina Frau-Meigs (Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris) and the Postscript by Roberto Apirici and David García Marín (UNED, Madrid).

Contributors are: Roberto Aparici, Adelina Calvo Salvador, Paul R. Carr, Colin Chasi, Sandra L. Cuervo Sanchez, Laura D’Olimpio, Milena Droumeva, Elia Fernández-Diaz, Ellen Field, Michael Forsman, Divina Frau-Meigs, Aquilina Fueyo, David García-Marín, Tania Goitandia Moore, José Gutiérrez-Pérez, Ignacio Haya Salmón, Bruno Salvador Hernández Levi, Michael Hoechsmann, Jennifer Jenson, Maria Korpijaakko, Sirkku Kotilainen, Emil Marmol, María Dolores Olvera-Lobo, Tania Ouariachi, Mari Pienimäki, Anna Renfors, Ylva Rodney-Gumede, Carlos Rodríguez-Hoyos, Mar Rodríguez-Romero, Tafadzwa Rugoho, Juha Suoranta, Gina Thésée, Robyn M. Tierney, Robert C. Williams and María Luisa Zorrilla Abascal.
Institutional leadership in higher education today requires the management of academic, financial and human resources to deliver teaching, research, external engagement, IT, student support, quality assurance, and estate management activities at levels ranging from local to global. This requires the development and deployment of subject expertise, diplomacy as well as a whole range of practical and technical skills. It can be difficult to balance the strategic needs of the institution with its practical, day-to-day management.

Drawing on more than 60 years of higher education experience around the world, the authors set out the fundamental elements of all higher education institutions and place them in a practical framework to enable leaders to understand their institutions more clearly, and develop appropriate responses to the unique issues that arise in each.

Accessible, insightful, comprehensive and universally applicable, An Illustrated Guide to Managing Institutions of Higher Education draws on numerous real-world examples and offers practical exercises to enable institutional leaders to understand how their institutions actually work, to develop appropriate responses to the issues that confront them and to manage their institutions more effectively.