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Songlines through Interviews
Activist and Socially Critical School and Community Renewal comes about at an incredibly important point in history, and it offers a genuinely new paradigm. This book attempts what few others have tried—to bring together knowledge and literature around school reform and community renewal through authentic ethnographic stories of real schools and communities. The book describes and analyzes a courageous struggle for a more socially just world, around notions of relational solidarity that speak back to ideas that continue to privilege the already advantaged. This book provides some desperately needed new storylines as a basis for school and community renewal for the most excluded groups in society. It provides a new social imagination for ‘doing school’ in contexts that stand to benefit from school and community voiced approaches.
Volume Editors: Murray Print and Henry Milner
Why does it appear that many young people are disengaging from democracy and political participation? For many governments, politicians, academics, social commentators and researchers this is a serious and challenging problem. Consequently widespread interest exists on how to engage young people in politics and democracy. Civic education has re-emerged as a possible answer to this question, though not necessarily in the form in which it may be currently known. This book examines research into issues about the engagement of young people in politics and democracy and examines research on civic education applications and programs which may address concerns about youth political participation. Murray Print and Henry Milner are professors from the University of Sydney and the Universite de Montreal respectively. They have brought together a group of leading researchers exploring the relationship between political participation and civic education to examine this relationship in greater depth.
This book breaks through in the field of mathematical creativity and giftedness. It suggests directions for closing the gap between research in the field of mathematics education and research in the field of creativity and giftedness. It also outlines a research agenda for further research and development in the field.
The book consists of a balanced set of chapters by mathematicians, mathematics educators, educational psychologists and educational researchers. The authors of different chapters accept dynamic conception of creativity and giftedness.
The book provides analysis of cognitive, affective and social factors associated with the development of creativity in all students and with the realisation of mathematical talent in gifted students. It contains theoretical essays, research reports, historical overviews, recommendations for curricular design, and insights about promotion of mathematical creativity and giftedness at different levels.
The readers will find many examples of challenging mathematical problems intended at developing or examining mathematical creativity and giftedness as well as ideas for direct implementation in school and tertiary mathematics courses. They will also find theoretical models that can be used in researching students’ creativity and giftedness. Research reports enlighten relationships between excellence in mathematics and creativity and examine different aspects of inquiry-based environment as a powerful way for developing mathematical creativity in school students. The readers can also learn about characteristics of creativity of research mathematicians.
Volume Editor: David B. Zandvliet
Research in environmental education (EE) is a growing field of inquiry and should be seen as respondent to a variety of program developments around the world. These diverse programs are the context for this body of educational research. Diversity in EE research is also compounded when one considers the various cultures, epistemologies and research traditions that may inform the field. This complexity accounts for the range of forms for environmental learning in formal, informal or non-formal contexts.
There is a good deal of evidence that, in order to be more responsive to the needs of diverse populations, program developments around the world are now beginning to reflect the variation in our society. However, the same cannot always be said in terms of research methodologies within mainstream environmental education research. Outside of a few examples, there seems to have been very little in the way of development of research genres aimed at understanding, characterizing and supporting cultural diversity within much of mainstream environmental education. Diversity of method may also be important for the overall quality (or health) of environmental education research. To locate many of the new ideas and approaches in this area, one needs to look outside environmental education, towards general educational research, or to other fields such as environmental justice, indigenous education, science education and health education to name only a few examples.
This volume of original research reports from around the globe begins to richly describe aspects of diversity in environmental education research. It does so in two ways: first, it mirrors the diversity of voices and cultures that are conducting research in this ever-broadening and increasingly global and international field of inquiry, second: it illuminates a potential diversity of research methods by highlighting a range of methodologies salient in other fields which have emerging promise for the practice of research in environmental education.
Classic NFB Documentary, Jacques Derrida, and the Curricular Otherwise
Author: Robert Nellis
The NFB’s mandate is “[t]o make and distribute films designed to help Canadians in all parts of Canada to understand the ways of living and the problems of Canadians in other parts.”

NFB Founding Commissioner John Grierson

"It’s only by our lack of ghosts we're haunted. "

Canadian poet Earle Birney

Haunting Inquiry: Classic NFB Documentary, Jacques Derrida, and the Curricular Otherwise reintroduces significant, if sometimes forgotten, National Film Board of Canada documentaries into contemporary curriculum conversation. Author Robert Christopher Nellis employs an inflection of Derridean deconstruction to mobilize historical, political, and intellectual themes emerging from the films as elliptical, curricular opportunities. The work explores hauntings in and around the documentaries to open toward Others neither fully present nor absent within the Canadian imagination. They remain troublingly illicit, as is the character of haunting…

This book’s contribution to the literature of curriculum is a unique and innovative conceptual framework, reintroduction of many classic NFB documentaries, and the use of a productive language and outlook to mobilize fresh perspectives and hopeful possibilities.
Author: Bryant Griffith
The craft of teaching and learning is like playing in a symphony orchestra; every instrument has a voice and every voice is integral to the whole. The arts, history, anthropology, and philosophy and their forged discourses offer us a series of cautionary tales about the multiplicity of ways we can see and understand our world, ways we often ignore in the classroom. In the case of epistemology, and pedagogy in particular, we have hinged our understanding on a binary of opposites engaged in a dialectic dance and a type of discourse constructed to describe and explain it. The art and act of teaching in this as-if world necessitates teachers to be public intellectuals; intellectual symbols who represent something more than just subject-knowledge expertise but serve as conduits between the discourses of our world.
Established genres and discourses are exclusionary. The vast migration of people and ideas is producing a new set of presuppositions. The manner in which we decode other discourses and fuse them into meanings, both personal and shared, is the root of both teaching and learning, giving us a window into the way that each form of thought is connected, both historically and experientially. Look around you, your school is becoming the United Nations, but it’s not so united. Don’t aim for truth, aim for understanding. Today’s students construct and deconstruct in a multitude of ways on an as-needed, just-in-time basis. Since ideas of difference are often nudged but unacknowledged, we are in danger of becoming pedagogical dinosaurs, not heeding change until it is too late.
Teaching and learning are construction zones, so get out your hard hat. These constructions are possibilities that need to be discussed and negotiated, allowing us to sidestep the traps of grand narratives and a hierarchy of discplinarity and research methodology. Our possibilities need to be forged on an anvil of diversity. These are the spaces, the interstices, where our voices become innovative and our silence offers a safe harbor. Spaces to listen, collaborate, and craft cautionary tales about our lives and the possibilities for a shared future.
Volume Editors: Eero Ropo and Tero Autio
This collection of essays from the most prominent scholars in the field of curriculum studies paint an intellectually rich palette of the present state of curriculum research across the countries and continents when the traditionally prevailed national imaginaries give increasingly way to transnational, international, and postnational impulses. The main parameters of education, subjectivity and its belonging, is shifting by employing the contradictory and broader issues around the question of nation and nation-state as well as around its traditional educational counterpart, the psychologized individual, both radically reinterpreted by post- and rereadings of old educational and social canons. International Conversations on Curriculum identifies the present transformations at work nationwide, worldwide, between and beyond, by focusing on these shifts from a variety of methodological, theoretical, national, political, and pedagogic concerns. It will open new and, one could argue, compelling vistas for reconsidering the social and political mission and moral purpose of education policies, of curriculum theory and practice in the increasingly but unevenly connected world characterized by economic volatility, unfair trade, ethnic and religious conflicts, and growing social instability and collective existential insecurity. As such, the essays are a vital international testimony to the scholarly vibrancy and to the global awareness of the current intellectualized field of curriculum studies to alertly recognize and register the cultural, educational, and political urgencies of our times.
"Places are made after their stories. Just as place names describe complex, and conflicted, place-making aspirations, so with all marks associated with the marking of places: tracks, the symbolic representation of these in song, dance and poetic speech, indeed all the technologies that join up distances into narratives—they all inscribe the earth’s surface with the forms of stories. Of course, these are not the same as the foundational myths of imperial cultures, whose aim is to displace any prior discourse of place-making. They are stories of, and as, journeys: passages in a double sense, constitutionally incomplete because they always await their completion in the act of crossing-over, or meeting, which, of course, is endless."
Paul Carter
‘Landscapes and Learning’ maps some of these stories and passageways to open up new place making possibilities. The book uses the lens of place to explore how we can respond differently to some of the major questions of our time. Postcolonial global concerns such as increased displacement and migration, the loss of indigenous knowledges, and the imperatives of environmental degradation and climate change, require critical educational responses. Place studies provides new languages and fresh metaphors to open up interdisciplinary conversations in the space between local and global, and indigenous and non-indigenous knowledges. Through its focus on the mutual constitution of bodies, identities, histories, spaces and places, place studies offers a conceptual tool for important cultural and environmental transformations.
Wisdom and activism come to us sometimes in the smallest and most unexpected ways through soft, previously silenced, yet passionate voices. Critical theory, critical literacy, and related approaches to learning about the world and many forms of knowledge can be a potentially effective way to address complexities of our changing world society. Critical pedagogists and other postmodern scholars speak often of the importance of educators taking on the risk and responsibility of being intellectual participants. By attending to both the sense of opposition and the sense of engaged participation intellectuals can explore the possibilities for action.
This book reports on qualitative research following educators—including parents, community elders and teachers using critical literacy—in several countries and documents the ways the educators use various funds of knowledge (Moll et al., 2005) for self-advocacy. It modestly attempts to address the funds of knowledge of educators (families and community members) in a variety of contexts from a variety of cultures, continents, and situations of living.
Thus, this book is for all of us striving to make connections with migrating people through our work—educators, researchers, community activists, classroom teachers, family advocates, and readers interested in the changing dynamics of societies.