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We live in a time of unprecedented media use, much of which can be accessed by devices that fit in our pockets. Young people, in particular, make use of media on a near-constant basis. How can this media use be better understood?

This text focuses on the scholarship and research of David Buckingham, a global leader in media literacy education and children’s and young people’s media cultures. It is not an exaggeration to state that studies and applications of media literacy education around the globe are indebted to the scholarship of Buckingham and that more nuanced understandings of how children and young people make sense of their media choices are due, in large part, to Buckingham’s work.

Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham focuses on the key contributions of Buckingham’s work over his prolific career, illuminating the advances he made in the field of media literacy education and understandings of young people’s media cultures. Through a close look at Buckingham’s theoretical advancements, contributions to the larger field of media literacy education, and the key strains of his research – how children and young people learn, what they already know about media and pop culture before they enter classrooms, end media content about and for youth – this text delineates Buckingham’s vast bibliography and will be an invaluable resource for anyone curious to know more about children, youth, and media literacy education.

Analysis of Buckingham’s work is drawn from his robust bibliography, exploration of scholarship he has critiqued, interpretation of contemporary social concerns through the lens of his research, and formal and informal conversations with him over the course of several years.
A Review of Educational Research
Preparing Indonesian Youth: A Review of Educational Research offers insights into the challenges and prospects in preparing Indonesian youth for 21st century living. The chapters feature empirically-based case studies focusing on three key aspects of education in Indonesia: teachers and teaching; school practices, programs, and innovations; and the social contexts of youth and schooling.

The case studies also represent different vantage points contributing to an enriched understanding of how larger social phenomenon—for example, education decentralisation in Indonesia, (rural-urban and transnational) migration, international benchmarking assessments, and the global feminist and women’s movement—impact and interact with enacted visions of preparing all youth educationally for work, as well as for meaningful participation in their respective communities and the Indonesian society at large.

Contributors are: Anindito Aditomo, Hasriadi Masalam, Juliana Murniati, Ahmad Bukhori Muslim, Wahyu Nurhayati, Shuki Osman, Margaretha Purwanti, Esti Rahayu, Ila Rosmilawati, Andrew Rosser, Widjajanti M. Santoso, Anne Suryani, Aries Sutantoputra, Novita W. Sutantoputri, Isabella Tirtowalujo, Nina Widyawati and David Wright.    
Advance Student-Scientist Partnerships beyond the Status Quo
Author: Pei-Ling Hsu
Working with scientists has been suggested as a powerful activity that can stimulate students’ interest and career aspirations in science. However, how to address challenges of power-over issues and communication barriers in youth-scientist partnerships? In Youths’ Cogenerative Dialogues with Scientists, the author describes a pioneering study to improve internship communications between youth and scientists through cogenerative dialogues. The findings show that cogenerative dialogues can help youth and scientists recognize, express, and manage their challenges and emotions as they arise in their internships. As a result, cogenerative dialogues help youth and scientists work productively as a team and enhance their social boding. Suggestions are also provided for science educators to design more innovative and effective projects for future youth-scientist partnerships.
Child-Parent Research Reimagined challenges the field to explore the meaning making experiences and the methodological and ethical challenges that come to the fore when researchers engage in research with their child, grandchild, or other relative. As scholars in and beyond the field of education grapple with ways that youth make meaning with digital and nondigital resources and practices, this edited volume offers insights into nuanced learning that is highly contextualized and textured while also (re)initiating important methodological and epistemological conversations about research that seeks to flatten traditional hierarchies, honor youth voices, and co-investigate facets of youth meaning making.

Contributors are (in alphabetical order): Charlotte Abrams, Sandra Schamroth Abrams, Kathleen M. Alley, Bill Cope, Mary Kalantzis, Molly Kurpis, Linda Laidlaw, Guy Merchant, Daniel Ness, Eric Ness, "E." O’Keefe, Joanne O’Mara, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie, Sarah Prestridge, Lourdes M. Rivera, Dahlia Rivera-Larkin, Nora Rivera-Larkin, Alaina Roach O’Keefe, Mary Beth Schaefer, Cassandra R. Skrobot, and Bogum Yoon.
Recognizing the vast numbers of old and young people alike that interact, socialize, and learn through gameplay, this book explores research approaches to games, their literacies, and the pedagogical possibilities of play. Consequentially, this volume is rooted in the idea that powerful forms of learning, communication, and multimodal production occur through and because of gaming. These profound literacy practices can mirror traditional literacies but the educational field’s approach to engaging in a pedagogy of playful literacies has been largely scattershot. By bringing together diverse voices, contexts, and research designs, the chapters in this volume present a snapshot of 21st century literacy practices at work and at play.

Organized into two parts, Studying Gaming Literacies explores the rich methodological approaches to gaming literacies scholarship as well as the possibilities of engaging in research in both classrooms and informal learning settings. With a robust set of context-specific approaches, this book acts less as a how-to manual for equity-driven scholarship than as a companion to support and undergird other research and pedagogical approaches to play and gaming in literacy-rich learning environments.

Focused on presenting scholarly approaches to gaming research, this volume, too, presents pedagogical takeaways for educators, for students, and for game designers and curators. Across the seven case studies presented in this volume, we call for intentional playful practices in educational research. The literacies of play are myriad and complex and – particularly in the name of educational equity – they demand to be studied, uplifted, and leveraged for academic achievement.

Contributors are: Jolynn Asato, Ali Carr-Chellman, Sebastián Castaño, Laura D’Aveta, Jennifer S. Dail, Jason Engerman, James Paul Gee, Robert Hein, Michael Hernandez, Ellen Middaugh, Raúl Alberto Mora , Shannon Mortimore-Smith, Tyrone Steven Orrego, Daniel Ramírez, Nate Turcotte, Shelbie Witte, and Jennifer Wyld.
Pathways to Education Reform for Urban Youth Culture
Author: Nadira Jack
Integrating experience and observations with theoretical ideologies and philosophical dispositions, the author provides a refreshing methodology and vision to the development of curriculum and instruction for administrative leaders, educators and policymakers in an urban education setting.

Collectively combing her administrative and instructional experience as an educator, principal and superintendent, she shares with readers a new pedagogical approach that emphasizes principles of collaboration and co-investigation among educators and students to explore universal life lessons and confront systemic oppression that impact urban youth. The Pedagogy of Consciousness is one that emphasizes a humanizing approach to education with balanced partnerships and shared connections among educators and students. The promise of this compelling model is that it collectively revitalizes a broken, disenfranchised system, while demonstrating the capacity to revolutionize urban education and transform lives.

The book opens up with a historical analysis of education, beginning with its inception and culminating with its present state of affairs, confronting systemic inequities and modes of standardization that still permeate today. The author provokes administrative leaders and educators to value student diversity and rethink the architecture of the traditional school systems by placing students at the forefront of their education through the co-development of curriculum and learning themes that impact their lives on a daily basis.

The Pedagogy of Consciousness provides innovative measures for educators and students alike to recognize the excellence that they were born with. The model, which is based on the dynamic disposition of education as a fluid, organic process, highlights relationship building among educators and students as a core element necessary to create a classroom culture based upon facets of loyalty, trust and mutual respect. To this end, educators and students investigate issues that affect their lives on a daily basis to experience self-growth and liberation that ultimately transcends into a shift in perception, thoughts and action. Embedded in the model is also the use of coping mechanisms and daily affirmations that allow students to recognize the highest form of one’s inner consciousness.

The author demonstrates the importance of leading educational reform through teaching students that they are pillars of their own success.
Considerations for Implementing Gaming Literacies in the Classroom
The possibilities of gaming for transformative and equity-driven instructional teaching practice are more robust than ever before. And yet, support for designing playful learning opportunities are too often not addressed or taught in professional development or teacher education programs. Considering the complex demands in public schools today and the niche pockets of extracurricular engagement in which youth find themselves, Playing with Teaching serves as a hands-on resource for teachers and teacher educators. Particularly focused on how games – both digital and non-digital – can shape unique learning and literacy experiences for young people today, this book’s chapters look at numerous examples that educators can bring into their classrooms today.

By exploring how teachers can support literacy practices through gaming, this volume provides specific strategies for heightening literacy learning and playful experiences in classrooms. The classroom examples of gameful teaching described in each chapter not only provide practical examples of games and learning, but offer critical perspectives on why games in literacy classrooms matter today.

Through depictions of cutting-edge of powerful and playful pedagogy, this book is not a how-to manual. Rather, Playing with Teaching fills a much-needed space demonstrating how games are applied in classrooms today. It is an invitation to reimagine classrooms as spaces to newly investigate playful approaches to teaching and learning with adolescents. Roll the dice and give playful literacy instruction a try.

Contributors are: Jill Bidenwald, Jennifer S. Dail, Elizabeth DeBoeser, Antero Garcia, Kip Glazer, Emily Howell, Lindy L. Johnson, Rachel Kaminski Sanders, Jon Ostenson, Chad Sansing, and Shelbie Witte.
The transformative power of education is widely recognised. Yet, harnessing the transformative power of education is complex for exactly those people and communities who would benefit the most. Much scholarship is available describing the ways in which educational access, opportunity and outcomes are unequally distributed; and much scholarship is dedicated to analysing and critiquing the ‘problems’ of education.

This volume gratefully builds on such analysis, to take a more constructive stance: examining how to better enable education to fulfil its promise of transforming lives.

Harnessing the Transformative Power of Education returns overall to a broader language of educational change rather than reduce our sense of scale and scope of ‘transformation’ to what might be measured in or by schools. It offers a series of practical, local but system wide and socially responsible practices, policies and analyses to support the ways that education can work at its best. The projects described here vary in scale and scope but are rooted in a wider sense of community and social responsibility so that education is considered as a necessary sustainable process to ensure productive futures for all.

Its contributors include not only scholars, but also professional experts and young people. The book’s aim is to share and advance authentic possibilities for enabling all children and young people to flourish through the transformative power of education.
This book presents nuanced small-scale studies and reflective essays, and is about voices of contemporary grandparents and grandchildren living in the State of Hawai'i which is rapidly going through economic, social, educational, and cultural transformation ushered in by forces of globalization and McDonaldization of society.

Hawai‘i is generally known as a great tourist destination that is no less than an imagined paradise. Hawai‘i is more than solely a site for tourism; it has a culturally and socially diverse population, and has a contested social history. In this context, in a deeper sense, the book gives the reader glimpses of family members at the level of intimacy among themselves in their place based situated interactions in today’s Hawai‘i. In its real essence, this book is an authentic collection of research papers, short stories, anecdotes, memories and reminiscences; of aloha (love, compassion, kindness) and mahalo (thanks, respect, and praise); of longing and search for legacy by diasporic elders, immigrants, settlers, American citizens, hyphenated Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders; by grandparents and grandchildren of diverse and multiple ethnicities, cultures, and races who have struggled hard through many decades to make Hawai‘i their permanent and beloved home and place, or long-term residence to live and raise their families.

The set of self-narratives in this book may have significant implications for understanding the process of aging in the State of Hawai'i; for social aging is both an individual and a social process in the sense that an individual’s biography is intimately related to her/his society’s biography. For “doing” roles such as being grandparents and grandchildren are heavily defined and structured by prevailing social and cultural processes.

The book may be useful for educators and students who are working and studying in areas such as education, sociology of family, social work, local and global social change, indigenous cultures and societies, alternative modernities and indigenizing social movements, race and ethnic relations, settler societies, social justice, health care, social gerontology, diaspora and immigration studies, and those working with youth in communities.

N.B. The Publisher notifies the readers that Voices of Social Justice and Diversity in a Hawai’i Context: Grandparents, Grandchildren, Schools, Communities, and Churches, edited by Amarjit Singh, M. Luafata Simanu-Klutz and Mike Devine, published in print in hardback, paperback and electronically on September 26, 2019, has been retracted as of March 12, 2020. On December 23, 2019, the Human Studies Program (HSP) of the University of Hawai’i (UH) notified the Publisher about alleged research misconduct by one of the editors and that a for-cause audit had been initiated on December 11, 2019. On February 27, 2020, the UH HSP shared the audit’s findings with the Publisher. The UH Social & Behavorial Institutional Review Board (IRB) identified research protocol violations by two of the editors, which constitute Serious Non-Compliance. Based on the audit’s findings, the Publisher has decided to withdraw both print and electronic versions of the book out of consideration for the research subjects and in view of irregularities identified by IRB.
Author: James Trier
Guy Debord, the Situationist International, and the Revolutionary Spirit presents a history of the two avant-garde groups that French filmmaker and subversive strategist Guy Debord founded and led: the Lettrist International (1952–1957) and the Situationist International (1957–1972). Debord is popularly known for his classic book The Society of the Spectacle (1967), but his masterwork is the Situationist International (SI), which he fashioned into an international revolutionary avant-garde group that orchestrated student protests at the University of Strasbourg in 1966, contributed to student unrest at the University of Nanterre in 1967–1968, and played an important role in the occupations movement that brought French society to a standstill in May of 1968.

The book begins with a brief history of the Lettrist International that explores the group’s conceptualization and practice of the critical anti-art practice of détournement, as well as the subversive spatial practices of the dérive, psychogeography, and unitary urbanism. These practices, which became central to the Situationist International, anticipated many contemporary cultural practices, including culture jamming, critical media literacy, and critical public pedagogy. This book follows up the edited book Détournement as Pedagogical Praxis (Sense Publishers, 2014), and together they offer readers, particularly those in the field of Education, an introduction to the history, concepts, and critical practices of a group whose revolutionary spirit permeates contemporary culture, as can be seen in the political actions of Pussy Riot in Russia, the “yellow vest” protesters in France, the #BlackLivesMatter movement, and the striking teachers and student protesters on campuses throughout the U.S.