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Language, Spirit, and the Development of Doctrine

God’s Breaking into Human Reality and Confronting the Problem of Language

Florian Klug

How do statements about God gain authority?
A hermeneutic analysis.

The revelation challenges humanity’s capacity of verbal expression in order to give a testimony. Aspects of current philosophy (Žižek, Badiou, Agamben, Eco), hermeneutics (Searle, Gadamer) and psychoanalysis (Lacan) render assistance to this task of understanding how this encounter is taken into the fields of language.
The horizon of this inquiry, though, also refers to the writings of the Church’s Magisterium. Decisive is here the Holy Spirit who not only enables faith but also provides the Church in the sensus fidelium with an infallible perspective. An ecclesiastical reception through the ages can mark an indirect demonstration of gifting process by the Spirit in both aspects (textualization and reception).

Reform(ing) Education

The Jena-Plan as a Concept for a Child-Centred School

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Ralf Koerrenz

"School as counter-public" is the hermeneutic key with which Ralf Koerrenz interprets the school model of the Jena Plan. Similar to the Dalton-Plan or the Winnetka-Plan, the Jena Plan is one of the most important concepts of alternative schools developed in the first half of the 20th century as part of the international movement for alternative education, the “World Education Fellowship”.

Peter Petersen's "Jena Plan" concept must be understood from his educational philosophical foundations. The didactic levels of action at school (teaching, learning) as well as the reflection of theory in pedagogical practice are made understandable by "school as a counter-public". Not least with a view to the today's Jena Plan schools, the question is asked for a context-independent core of what makes a school a Jena Plan school. The opportunities and ambivalences of the model thus become equally visible.

Edited by Ludger Honnefelder, Roberto Hofmeister Pich and Roberto Hofmeister Pich

The scholarly purpose of the volume is to restate and describe the historical reception of John Duns Scotus’ meta-physics, which, by taking the real concept of “being as being” as the first object of first philosophy, laid the ground-work for what scholars have called “the second beginning of metaphysics” in Western philosophy.
Scotus outlined a theory of transcendental concepts that includes an analysis of the concept of being and its prop-erties, and a general analysis of modalities and intrinsic modes, paving the way for a view of metaphysics as a sci-ence of “possible being.” From the fourteenth to the eighteenth century Scotists invented and developed special concepts that could embrace both real being and the being of reason. The investigation of the metaphysics of the transcendentals by subsequent thinkers who were guided by Scotus is the central focus of the present collective book.

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Edited by Ralf Koerrenz, Friederike von Horn and Friederike von Horn

The Lost Mirror traces cultural patterns in which the interpretation of learning and education was developed against the backdrop of Hebrew thought.

The appreciation of learning is deeply rooted in the Hebrew way of thinking. Learning is understood as an open and history-conscious engagement of man with culture. The consciousness of history is shaped by the motif of the unavailability of the “other” and the difference to this “other”. This “other” is traditionally remembered as “God”, but may also be reflected in the motifs of the other person or the other society. The Lost Mirror reminds us
of a deficit, which is that in our everyday thinking and everyday action, we usually hide, forget and partly suppress the meaning and presence of the unavailable other. The book approaches this thinking through portraits of people such as Hannah Arendt, Leo Baeck, Walter Benjamin, Agnes Heller, Emanuel Levinas, and others.

Public Baths and Bathing Habits in Late Antiquity

A Study of the Evidence from Italy, North Africa and Palestine A.D. 285-700

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Sadi Maréchal

In this book Sadi Maréchal examines the survival, transformation and eventual decline of Roman public baths and bathing habits in Italy, North Africa and Palestine during Late Antiquity. Through the analysis of archaeological remains, ancient literature, inscriptions and papyri, the continued importance of bathhouses as social hubs within the urban fabric is demonstrated, thus radically altering common misconceptions of their decline through the rise of Christianity and elite seclusion. Persistent ideas about health and hygiene, as well as perpetuating ideas of civic self-esteem, drove people to build, restore and praise these focal points of daily life when other classical buildings were left to crumble.

Contemporary Fairy-Tale Magic

Subverting Gender and Genre

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Edited by Lydia Brugué and Auba Llompart

Contemporary Fairy-Tale Magic, edited by Lydia Brugué and Auba Llompart, studies the impact of fairy tales on contemporary cultures from an interdisciplinary perspective, with special emphasis on how literature and film are retelling classic fairy tales for modern audiences. We are currently witnessing a resurgence of fairy tales and fairy-tale characters and motifs in art and popular culture, as well as an increasing and renewed interest in reinventing and subverting these narratives to adapt them to the expectations and needs of the contemporary public. The essays also observe how the influence of academic disciplines like Gender Studies and current literary and cinematic trends also play an important part in the revision of fairy-tale plots, characters and themes.

Edited by Theodosia Prodromou

New digital technologies offer many exciting opportunities to educators who are looking to develop better teaching practices. When technologies are new, however, the potential for beneficial and effective implementations and applications is not yet fully recognized. This book is intended to provide teachers and researchers with a wide range of ideas from researchers working to integrate the new technology of Augmented Reality into educational settings and processes. It is hoped that the research and theory presented here can support both teachers and researchers in future work with this exciting new technology.

Contributors are: Miriam Adamková, Gilles Aldon, Panayiota Anastasi, Ferdinando Arzarello, Martina Babinská, Zuzana Berger Haladova, Robert Bohdal, Francisco Botana, Constadina Charalambous, Eva Csandová, Omer Deperlioglu, Monika Dillingerová, Christos Dimopoulos, Jiří Dostál, Jihad EL-Sana, Andrej Ferko, Michael N. Fried, Marian Fuchsová, Marianthi Grizioti, Tomáš Hlava, Markus Hohenwarter, Kateřina Jančaříková, Konstantinos Katzis, Lilla Korenova, Utku Köse, Dušan Kostrub, Zoltán Kovács, Blanka Kožík Lehotayová, Maria Kožuchová, Chronis Kynigos, Ilona-Elefteryja Lasica, Zsolt Lavicza, Álvaro Martínez, Efstathios Mavrotheris, Katerina Mavrou, Maria Meletiou-Mavrotheris, Peter Ostradicky, Georgios Papaioannou, Miroslava Pirhacova Lapsanska, Stavros Pitsikalis, Corinne Raffin, Tomás Recio, Cristina Sabena, Florian Schacht, Eva Severini, Martina Šipošová, Zacharoula Smyrnaiou, Nayia Stylianidou, Osama Swidan, Christos Tiniakos, Melanie Tomaschko, Renata Tothova, Christina Vasou, and Ibolya Veress-Bagyi.

Edited by Govert J. Buijs and Simon Polinder

International relations are in constant turbulence. Globalisation, the rise and fall of superpowers, the fragilisation of the EU, trade wars, real wars, terrorism, persecution, new nationalism and identity politics, climate change, are just a few of the recent disturbing developments. How can international issues be understood and addressed from a Christian faith perspective? In this book answers are presented from various Christian traditions: Neo-calvinism, Catholic social teaching, critical theory and Christian realism. The volume offers fundamental theological and Christian philosophical perspectives on international relations and global challenges, case studies about inspiring Christian leaders such as Robert Schuman, Dag Hammarskjöld, Abraham Kuyper and prophetic critiques of supranational issues.

Collaborative Practical Theology

Engaging Practitioners in Research on Christian Practices

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Henk de Roest

Collaborative Practical Theology documents and analyses research on Christian practices conducted by academic practical theologians in collaboration with practitioners of different kinds in Christian practices all around the world. These practitioners include professional practitioners, everyday believers, volunteers and students in theological education. The book offers rationales for setting up joint investigation groups with different ‘communities of practice’, describes a wide range of collaborative research strategies and methods and also has a clear eye for their limitations. In Christian practices faith is mediated, enacted and nurtured. The aim of the book is to improve the utility of theological research on these practices. It communicates the vision that academic research is for the people of God in today’s world.

Community Work and Adult Education in Staveley, North-East Derbyshire, 1969–1971

Retrospective Consideration, Selective Re-presentation, and a Reflective Critique

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Colin Kirkwood

In 1969, Colin Kirkwood took on the job of Area Principal for Adult Education in north-east Derbyshire. There he formed a remarkable creative partnership with Rob Hunter, a brilliant young community worker. This is the story of their collaboration and dialogue with the people of Staveley, a small coal, steel and chemicals town in the north-midlands of England. Together they created the local newspaper, Staveley Now, the Staveley Disabled Group, the Staveley Festival and much else. Community Work and Adult Education in Staveley, North-East Derbyshire celebrates this important collaboration by drawing on letters, interviews, poems, issues of the local newspaper and reports and articles written at the time. The research and critical assessment of their work together in the early 1970s can be linked with that of Paulo Freire in Latin America and throughout the world.