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Edited by Gary Gurtler and Daniel P. Maher

This volume, the thirty-fourth year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2017-18. Paper topics include: the nature of unity in the Parmenides; the role of generation in understanding the priority of activity in Aristotle’s Metaphysics; the relation of language and craft in Plato’s critique of sophistry; the ambiguous place of pity for one’s slave in the Epicurean sage’s hedonistic egoism; using the distinction of praising and prizing as pointing toward the higher status of happiness to virtue in NE X.6-8. The commentators do their work in challenging some of these claims and supporting others. Contributors are Kelly Arenson, Daniel Gardner, David Horan, Colin King, Max Latona, D.C. Schindler, Mark Sentesy, Daniel Shartin, Susan Stark and Jan Szaif.

Series:

Gwynaeth McIntyre

As political power in Rome became centered on the emperor and his family, a system of honors and titles developed as one way to negotiate this new power dynamic. Classified under the modern collective heading ‘imperial cult’ (or emperor worship or ruler cult), this system of worship comprises religious rituals as well as political, economic, and social aspects. In this article, Gwynaeth McIntyre surveys the range of ancient literary sources and modern scholarly debates on how individuals became gods in the Roman world. Beginning with the development of exceptional honors granted to Julius Caesar and his deification, she traces the development of honors, symbols, and religious rituals associated with the worship of imperial family members. She uses case studies to illustrate how cult practices, temples, and priesthoods were established, highlighting the careful negotiation required between the emperor, imperial family, Senate, and populace in order to make mortals into gods.

Series:

Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the thirty-third year of published proceedings, contains four papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2016-17. Paper topics include: a liar’s paradox in Parmenides’ Poem centered on the role of the goddess; Aristotelian logic as rooted in natural things, not mental entities, in Posterior Analytics; authorial freedom in Aristotle’s Poetics rooted in the ‘likely and necessary’; Callicles’ attack on philosophy as taking away one’s substance and Socrates’ concurrence to preserve its pursuit of truth and the good in Plato’s Gorgias. The comments do their work in challenging some of these claims and supporting others.

Contributors are Lloyd W. J. Aultman-Moore, Rose Cherubin, Shane Ewegen, Joseph M. Forte, Owen Goldin, Edward C. Halper, Jean-Marc Narbonne and Yale Weiss.

Series:

Edited by William Wians and Gary Gurtler

This volume, the thirty-second year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2015-16. Paper topics include: Stoic constitution of bodies through blending as causal; the failure to distinguish divine and human eros in the Phaedrus; perception in the Republic’s tripartite soul, recognizing autonomy in the non-rational parts; Stoic identity, peculiar qualities and the role of the pneuma, and an alternative read of Plato’s politics that pairs his philosophical theory and historical events, the Republic as reconstruction of Socrates’ defense in the Apology and the Laws as a reconstruction of Plato’s idea of political reform in the Seventh Letter.

Series:

Edited by William Wians and Gary Gurtler

This volume, the thirty-first year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2014-15. Paper topics include: the volatility of ἔρως in the Symposium as not self-directed to good or bad; the ‘analytical’ reading of the tripartite soul as autonomous sub-agents and whether it resembles neuroscience; holiness in the Euthyphro as misconstrued by the difficulty translating finite passives and passive participles in English; evil in Proclus as an indefinite nature redefined by privation, subcontrary and parypostasis, contrary to Plotinus’ identification of matter and evil; Plato’s literary reworking of the encounter of Odysseus with the Cyclops in the Sophist and of his struggle with the suitors in the Statesman.

Edited by Ioannis Mylonopoulos

The polytheistic religious systems of ancient Greece and Rome reveal an imaginative attitude towards the construction of the divine. One of the most important instruments in this process was certainly the visualisation. Images of the gods transformed the divine world into a visually experienceable entity, comprehensible even without a theoretical or theological superstructure. For the illiterates, images were together with oral traditions and rituals the only possibility to approach the idea of the divine; for the intellectuals, images of the gods could be allegorically transcended symbols to reflect upon. Based on the art historical and textual evidence, this volume offers a fresh view on the historical, literary, and artistic significance of divine images as powerful visual media of religious and intellectual communication.

Magical Practice in the Latin West

Papers from the International Conference held at the University of Zaragoza, 30 Sept. – 1st Oct. 2005

Edited by Richard L. Gordon and Simón Marco

How different was the practice of magic in the Latin West from that of the eastern Mediterranean basin? Was it just derivative from Greek practice, or did it have its own originality? The recent discovery of important new curse-tablets in Mainz and in the Fountain of Anna Perenna at Rome has made the question newly topical. This volume contains the first commented editions in English of most of these new texts as well as major surveys of new prayers for justice. Other sections are devoted to the discourse of magic in the West, to the linguistics and aims of cursing, and to the major field of protective and eudaemonic magic up to and including the Visigothic slates and the Celtic loricae. The essays are by well-known scholars in the field as well as by established and younger Spanish scholars.

From Temple to Church

Destruction and Renewal of Local Cultic Topography in Late Antiquity

Stephen Emmel

Edited by Johannes Hahn and Ulrich Gotter

Destruction of temples and their transformation into churches are central symbols of late antique change in religious environment, socio-political system, and public perception. Contemporaries were aware of these events’ far-reaching symbolic significance and of their immediate impact as demonstrations of political power and religious conviction. Joined in any “temple-destruction” are the meaning of the monument, actions taken, and subsequent literary discourse. Paradigms of perception, specific interests, and forms of expression of quite various protagonists clashed. Archaeologists, historians, and historians of religion illuminate “temple-destruction” from different perspectives, analysing local configurations within larger contexts, both regional and imperial, in order to find an appropriate larger perspective on this phenomenon within the late antique movement “from temple to church”.

Mantikê

Studies in Ancient Divination

Edited by Sarah Iles Johnston and Peter T. Struck

This book thoroughly revisits divination as a central phenomenon in the lives of ancient Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians. It collects studies from many periods in Graeco-Roman history, from the Archaic period to the late Roman, and touches on many different areas of this rich topic, including treatments of dice oracles, sortition in both pagan and Christian contexts, the overlap between divination and other interpretive practices in antiquity, the fortunes of independent diviners, the activity of Delphi in ordering relations with the dead, the role of Egyptian cult centers in divinatory practices, and the surreptitious survival of recipes for divination by corpses. It also reflects a range of methodologies, drawn from anthropology, history of religions, intellectual history, literary studies, and archaeology, epigraphy, and paleography. It will be of particular interest to scholars and student of ancient Mediterranean religions.

Edited by Marvin Meyer and Paul Mirecki

This volume contains a series of provocative essays that explore expressions of magic and ritual power in the ancient world. The essays are authored by leading scholars in the fields of Egyptology, ancient Near Eastern studies, the Hebrew Bible, Judaica, classical Greek and Roman studies, early Christianity and patristics, and Coptology.
Throughout the book the essays examine the terms employed in descriptions of ancient magic. From this examination comes a clarification of magic as a polemical term of exclusion but also an understanding of the classical Egyptian and early Greek conceptions of magic as a more neutral category of inclusion.
This book should prove to be foundational for future scholarly studies of ancient magic and ritual power.

This publication has also been published in hardback (no longer available).