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Edited by Gary Gurtler and Daniel P. Maher

This volume, the thirty-fourth year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2017-18. Paper topics include: the nature of unity in the Parmenides; the role of generation in understanding the priority of activity in Aristotle’s Metaphysics; the relation of language and craft in Plato’s critique of sophistry; the ambiguous place of pity for one’s slave in the Epicurean sage’s hedonistic egoism; using the distinction of praising and prizing as pointing toward the higher status of happiness to virtue in NE X.6-8. The commentators do their work in challenging some of these claims and supporting others. Contributors are Kelly Arenson, Daniel Gardner, David Horan, Colin King, Max Latona, D.C. Schindler, Mark Sentesy, Daniel Shartin, Susan Stark and Jan Szaif.

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Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the thirty-third year of published proceedings, contains four papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2016-17. Paper topics include: a liar’s paradox in Parmenides’ Poem centered on the role of the goddess; Aristotelian logic as rooted in natural things, not mental entities, in Posterior Analytics; authorial freedom in Aristotle’s Poetics rooted in the ‘likely and necessary’; Callicles’ attack on philosophy as taking away one’s substance and Socrates’ concurrence to preserve its pursuit of truth and the good in Plato’s Gorgias. The comments do their work in challenging some of these claims and supporting others.

Contributors are Lloyd W. J. Aultman-Moore, Rose Cherubin, Shane Ewegen, Joseph M. Forte, Owen Goldin, Edward C. Halper, Jean-Marc Narbonne and Yale Weiss.

Nietzsche and the Dionysian

A Compulsion to Ethics

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Peter Durno Murray

Nietzsche and the Dionysian argues that the shuddering mania of the affect associated with Dionysus in Nietzsche’s early work runs as a thread through his thought and is linked to an originary interruption of self-consciousness articulated by the philosophical companion. In this capacity, the companion can be considered a ‘mask of Dionysus’, or one who assumes the singular role of the transmitter of the most valuable affirmative affect and initiates a compulsion to respond which incorporates the otherness of the companion. In the context of such engagements, Nietzsche envisages ‘Dionysian’ or divine ‘madness’ within an optics of life, through which an affirmative ethics can be thought. The ethical response to the philosophical companion requires an affirmation of the plurality of life, formulated in the imperatives to be ‘true to the earth’ and ‘become who you are’. Such an ethics, compelled by the Dionysian affect, grounds any future for humanity in the affirmation of the earth and life.

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Piotr Jaroszyński

Metaphysics or Ontology? treats the evolution of the object of metaphysics from being, to the concept of being, to, finally, the object (thought). Possible being must be non-contradictory, but an object of thought includes anything a human being can think, including contradictions and nothingness. When the concept of being, or object of thought, replaces existence as the object of metaphysics, it becomes something other than metaphysics—ontology, or something beyond ontology. However, ontology cannot examine existence because it only investigates concepts and possibility. Only classical metaphysics investigates reality qua reality. This book masterfully treats the history of this controversy and many other important metaphysical questions raised over the centuries

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Edited by Thorsten Botz-Bornstein and Giannis Stamatellos

Plotinus and the Moving Image offers the first philosophical discussion on Plotinus' philosophy and film. It discusses Plotinian concepts like "the One" in a cinematic context and relates Plotinus' theory of time as a transitory intelligible movement of the soul to Bergson’s and Deleuze’s time-image. Film is a unique medium for a rapprochement of our modern consciousness with the thought of Plotinus. The Neoplatonic vestige is particularly worth exploring in the context of the newly emerging “Cinema of Contemplation.” Plotinus' search for the "intelligible" that can be grasped neither by sense perception nor by merely logical abstractions leads to a fluent way of seeing. Parallels that had so far never been discussed are made plausible. This book is a milestone in the philosophy of film.

Contributors are: Cameron Barrows, Thorsten Botz-Bornstein, Michelle Phillips Buchberger, Steve Choe, Stephen Clark, Vincenzo Lomuscio, Tony Partridge, Daniel Regnier, Giannis Stamatellos, Enrico Terrone, Sebastian F. Moro Tornese and Panayiota Vassilopoulou.

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Edited by William Wians and Gary Gurtler

This volume, the thirty-second year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2015-16. Paper topics include: Stoic constitution of bodies through blending as causal; the failure to distinguish divine and human eros in the Phaedrus; perception in the Republic’s tripartite soul, recognizing autonomy in the non-rational parts; Stoic identity, peculiar qualities and the role of the pneuma, and an alternative read of Plato’s politics that pairs his philosophical theory and historical events, the Republic as reconstruction of Socrates’ defense in the Apology and the Laws as a reconstruction of Plato’s idea of political reform in the Seventh Letter.

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Edited by William Wians and Gary Gurtler

This volume, the thirty-first year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2014-15. Paper topics include: the volatility of ἔρως in the Symposium as not self-directed to good or bad; the ‘analytical’ reading of the tripartite soul as autonomous sub-agents and whether it resembles neuroscience; holiness in the Euthyphro as misconstrued by the difficulty translating finite passives and passive participles in English; evil in Proclus as an indefinite nature redefined by privation, subcontrary and parypostasis, contrary to Plotinus’ identification of matter and evil; Plato’s literary reworking of the encounter of Odysseus with the Cyclops in the Sophist and of his struggle with the suitors in the Statesman.

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Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the thirtieth year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2013-14. The paper topics include: pleasure in the Philebus under the rubric of the fourfold structure of reality; the tension between the good of the city and the good of the citizens in the Republic; the relation of self-knowledge to dialectic in Theaetetus and Alcibiades I; a close examination of the interplay of the characters in the Sophist to counter Plato’s replacement of Socrates by the Eleatic Stranger; and three autobiographical passages in different dialogues to establish philosophical practice as intellectual and emotional together.

Series:

Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the twenty-ninth year of published proceedings, contains six papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2012-13. The paper topics include: Glaucon's fate in the Republic, divine creation and human responsibility in the Timaeus, Aristotle on orexis in generation, on the biological use of analogy and finally on dialectic as proto-phenomenological, and lastly, Proclus on likeness and unlikeness as ontological first principles.

Avicenna and the Aristotelian Tradition

Introduction to Reading Avicenna's Philosophical Works. Second, Revised and Enlarged Edition, Including an Inventory of Avicenna’s Authentic Works

Dimitri Gutas

Through close study of Avicenna's statements and major works, Dimitri Gutas traces Avicenna's own sense of his place in the Aristotelian tradition and the history of philosophy in Islam, and provides an introduction to reading his philosophical works by delineating the approach most consistent with Avicenna's intention and purpose in philosophy. The second edition of this foundational work, which has quickened fruitful research into the philosopher in the last quarter century, is completely revised and updated, and adds a new final chapter summarizing Avicenna's philosophical project. It is also enlarged with the addition of a new appendix which offers a critical inventory of Avicenna's authentic works, updating the work of Mahdavi (1954) with additional information on all manuscripts and important editions and translations. Its usefulness enhanced, the book provides primary orientation to Avicenna's philosophy and works and constitutes an indispensable research tool for their study.

Winner of the I. R. Iran World Award for the Book of the Year 2014