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Edited by Patricia Salazar-Campillo and Victòria Codina-Espurz

The present volume, edited by Patricia Salazar-Campillo and Victòria Codina-Espurz, is a timely contribution to the field of interlanguage pragmatics. The nine chapters presented here expand the scope of research to date by including different contexts (i.e., formal instruction, stay-abroad, and online) and age groups which have received less attention (for example, young learners and adolescents). Whereas the speech act of requesting is the one that has been most explored in the field of interlanguage pragmatics, as attested by several chapters in the present volume, disagreements and directives are also tackled. This book embraces research addressing both elicited and naturally-occurring data in studies which deal with pragmatic use, development, and awareness.

Dynamics of Teaching and Learning Modern Hebrew as an Additional Language

Using Hebrew as a means of instruction and acquisition

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Yona Gilead

In Dynamics of Teaching and Learning Modern Hebrew as an Additional Language Yona Gilead presents original research into classroom interactional practices by offering a thick description of a successful beginner-level Modern Hebrew program at an Australian university. The book charts and theorizes the cohort’s teacher and students’ trajectory of using Hebrew as the main means of instructing and acquiring the language, and highlights seven key features which contribute to students’ learning. The book’s research-based findings and analysis of classroom dynamics contribute to theorizing the currently largely praxis-based discipline of L2 Modern Hebrew instruction, hence providing a stronger theoretical understanding of how and why students can be assisted in their language learning.

This original research provides a template for renewed L2 Hebrew research.

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Michael Long, Gisela Granena and Yucel Yilmaz

The past 50 years have witnessed achievement of a set of widely attested empirical findings on major research issues in SLA. They pertain to such matters as cross-linguistic influence; processes and sequences in interlanguage development; age effects; incidental and intentional, learning and implicit and explicit knowledge; the role of the linguistic environment and of the broader social context as sources of positive and negative evidence and of opportunities for input, interaction and output; and effects of individual differences in language aptitudes and other cognitive and affect variables. Robust findings in any scientific field constitute empirical ‘problems’ that require explanation and motivate theoretical work. In this inaugural volume of Brill Research Perspectives in Multilingualism and Second Language Acquisition, Michael Long, Gisela Granena and Yucel Yilmaz review work on a selection of these issues, and note implications of some of the work for language teaching, educational language planning, human migration, and other important matters of social concern.

A Long the Krommerun

Selected Papers from the Utrecht James Joyce Symposium

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Edited by Onno Kosters, Tim Conley and Peter de Voogd

A LONG THE KROMMERUN offers a selection of the best papers delivered at the XXIV International James Joyce Symposium hosted by Utrecht University, the Netherlands, June 2014. The essays offer fresh insights into Joyce and De Stijl aesthetic movement which originated in the Netherlands, Joyce’s (language) politics, his use of multilingualism and dialects, and, by way of close readings and genetic approaches of Finnegans Wake, the intricate ways Joyce communicates with his readers.

Contributors: Boriana A. Alexandrova, Stephanie Boland, Austin Briggs, Tim Conley, Catherine Flynn, Philip Keel Geheber, Robbert-Jan Henkes, Maria Kager, Katherine O’Callaghan, So Onose, David Pascoe, Sam Slote, David Spurr, and Dirk Van Hulle.

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Bernard Spolsky

Until quite recently, the term Diaspora (usually with the capital) meant the dispersion of the Jews in many parts of the world. Now, it is recognized that many other groups have built communities distant from their homeland, such as Overseas Chinese, South Asians, Romani, Armenians, Syrian and Palestinian Arabs. To explore the effect of exile of language repertoires, the article traces the sociolinguistic development of the many Jewish Diasporas, starting with the community exiled to Babylon, and following through exiles in Muslim and Christian countries in the Middle Ages and later. It presents the changes that occurred linguistically after Jews were granted full citizenship. It then goes into details about the phenomenon and problem of the Jewish return to the homeland, the revitalization and revernacularization of the Hebrew that had been a sacred and literary language, and the rediasporization that accounts for the cases of maintenance of Diaspora varieties.