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Editor: Ali A. Abdi
With the limited availability of related foci in the area of critical educational studies, Critical Theorizations of Education is timely in both its topical relevance and time-space-themed discursive interventions. With its overall scope, constructed as both a counter-and-forward looking critical reflections and analysis of some of the most salient and contemporaneously active platforms of education, it prospectively and relatively comprehensively expands on dynamically intersecting learning and teaching contexts and relationships. As such, the volume’s contents by both established and emerging scholars, selectively locate the interplays of knowledge, learning and attendant power relations, which either transform or reproduce the status quo.

Contributors are: Levonne Abshire, Claire Alkouatli, David Anderson, Neda Asadi, N’Dri Thérèse Assié-Lumumba, Gulbahar Beckett, José Cossa, Ratna Ghosh, Shibao Guo, Yan Guo, Carl E. James, Dip Kapoor, Festus Kelonye Beru, Ginette Lafreniere, Qing Li, Oliver Masakure, Magnus Mfoafo-M'Carthy, Greg William Misiaszek, Dolana Mogadime, Samson Nashon, Selline Ooko, Bathseba Opini, Amy Parent, Thashika Pillay, Edward Shizha, Kimberley Tavares, Alison Taylor, and Stacey Wilson-Forsberg.
Volume Editors: Jane A. Van Galen and Jaye Sablan
The contributors to Amplified Voices, Intersecting Identities: First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power overcame deeply unequal educational systems to become the first in their families to finish college. Now, they are among the 3% of first-generation undergraduate students to go on to graduate school, in spite of structural barriers that worked against them.

These scholars write of socialization to the professoriate through the complex lens of intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social class.

These first-generation graduate students have crafted critical narratives of the structural obstacles within higher education that stand in the way of brilliant scholars who are poor and working-class, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, immigrant, queer, white, and women. They write of agency in creating defiant networks of support, of sustaining connections to family and communities, of their activism and advocacy on campus. They refuse to perpetuate the myths of meritocracy that reproduce the inequalities of higher education. In response to research literature and to campus programming that frames their identities around “need”, they write instead of agentive and politicized intersectional identities as first-generation graduate students, committed to institutional change through their research, teaching, and service.

Contributors are: Lamesha C. Brown, LaToya Brown, Altheria Caldera, Araceli Calderón, Marisa V. Cervantes, Joy Cobb, Raven K. Cokley, Francine R. Coston, Angela Gay, Josué R. López, Rebecca Morgan, Gloria A. Negrete-Lopez, Lisa S. Palacios, Takeshia Pierre, Alejandra I. Ramírez, Matt Reid, Ebony Russ, Jaye Sablan, Travis Smith, Phitsamay S. Uy, Jane A. Van Galen, Jason K. Wallace and Lin Wu.
First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power in Early Academic Careers
Volume Editors: Jane A. Van Galen and Jaye Sablan
The contributors to Amplified Voices, Intersecting Identities: First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power in Early Careers overcame deeply unequal educational systems to become the first in their families to finish college. Now, they are among the 3% of first-generation undergraduate students to go on to graduate school and then become faculty, in spite of structural barriers that worked against them.

These scholars write of socialization to the professoriate through the complex lens of intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, ability and social class.

These first-generation graduate students have crafted critical narratives of the structural obstacles within higher education that stand in the way of brilliant scholars who are poor and working-class, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, immigrant, queer, white, women, or people with disabilities. They write of agency in creating defiant networks of support, of sustaining connections to family and communities, of their activism and advocacy on campus. They refuse to perpetuate the myths of meritocracy that reproduce the inequalities of higher education. In response to a research literature and to campus programming that frames their identities around “need”, they write instead of agentive and politicized intersectional identities as first-generation graduate students, committed to institutional change through their research, teaching, and service.

Contributors are: Veronica R. Barrios, Candis Bond, Beth Buyserie, Noralis Rodríguez Coss, Charise Paulette DeBerry, Janette Diaz, Alfred P. Flores, José García, Cynthia George, Shonda Goward, Luis Javier Pentón Herrera, Nataria T. Joseph, Castagna Lacet, Jennifer M. Longley, Catherine Ma, Esther Díaz Martín, Nadia Yolanda Alverez Mexia, T. Mark Montoya, Miranda Mosier, Michelle Parrinello-Cason, J. Michael Ryan, Adrián Arroyo Pérez, Will Porter, Jaye Sablan, Theresa Stewart-Ambo, Keisha Thompson, Ethan Trinh, Jane A. Van Galen and Wendy Champagnie Williams.
Multilingual Immigrants in the United States
This edited book is a beautiful and powerful collection of poems and personal and visual narratives of multilingual immigrants in the United States. The purpose of this book is to create a space where immigrant stories can be told from their personal perspectives. The contributors are immigrants from all walks of life who represent a diverse picture of languages, professions, and beliefs from the immigrant diasporas within the United States. Inspired by the use of autoethnography, authors examine their own lives through poems and personal and visual narratives to share with others who might have similar experiences.

Contributors are: Gabriel Teodoro Acevedo Velázquez, Fatmeh Alalawneh, Bashar Al Hariri, Rajwan Alshareefy, Ana Bautista, May F. Chung, Zurisaray Espinosa, Manuel De Jesús Gómez Portillo, Jamie Harris, Ben Haseen, Lydiah Kananu Kiramba, Babak Khoshnevisan, Sharada Krishnamurthy, Judith Landeros, Jiyoon Lee, Pablo Montes, Aracelis Nieves, Gloria Park, Mauricio Patrón Rivera, Luis Javier Pentón Herrera, Tairan Qiu, R. Joseph Rodríguez, Cristina Sánchez-Martín, Sandy Tadeo, Ethan Tính Trịnh, Geovanny Vicente Romero, and Polina Vinogradova.
Overarching principles of human rights which shore up a nearly 30-year history of international efforts to develop educational systems that are responsive to the needs of all. Arguably the most widely recognised international inclusive education policy, the Salamanca Statement released in 1994 from the United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), recognised that every child has a basic right to education.

In so doing, however, it drew a line around special needs as a particular emphasis, in globalising efforts towards equal opportunity through decrees for first principles of universally attainable privileges. Considered a watershed moment in global responses to educational exclusion, the Salamanca Statement was core to increasing awareness among nations of the need for fostering more inclusive education policy and practice. Nonetheless, the liberal ideologies that frame human rights in inclusive education are seldom called into question, despite perpetual marginalisation and disadvantage post Salamanca.

Inclusive Education Is a Right, Right? brings the many together to consider educational democracy at a moment in global history where the political order fractures populations, and the displacement of socio-economic participation is displayed in every news bulletin – true, fake or otherwise. Under these conditions, the significance of academic activism, wherein diverse perspectives, methodologies and theoretical approaches are put to work to increase equity in education, has perhaps never been so stark. Across the collection the combined chapters engage with researchers, students, education professionals and leaders, advocacy organisations, and people experiencing exclusion and consider human rights in relation to inclusive education.

Contributors are: Kate Anderson, Alison Baker, Tim Corcoran, Edwin Creely, Jenny Duke, Peng-Sim Eng, Leechin Heng, Anna Kilderry, Sarah Lambert, Bec Marland, Julianne Moss, Philippa Moylan, Mia Nosrat, Joanne O’Mara, Jo Raphael, Bethany Rice, Andrew Riordan, Amathullah Shakeeb, Roger Slee, Kitty te Riele, Matthew K. E. Thomas, Peter Walker, Scott Welsh, Ben Whitburn, Julie White and Michalinos Zembylas.
Issues, Strategies and Good Practices for Inclusion
The social dimension of higher education emphasises the need to create more flexible learning and participation pathways within higher education for all students. In recent years, several projects have been developed and research groups created that have allowed considerable progress in the promotion and monitoring of more inclusive policies in this field. However, designing and implementing programmes providing attention to vulnerable groups remains a challenge for universities. Including the most significant contributions of the European project ACCESS4ALL, the book presents conceptual aspects related to the inclusive university, such as the quality and transitions linked to the treatment of diversity, good inclusion practices in six European countries, and a set of tools to identify dysfunctions and promote inclusion in higher education.

Contributors are: Kati Clements, Fabio Dovigo, Joaquín Gairín, Romiță Iucu, Miguel Jerónimo, Lisa Lucas, Tiina Mäkelä, Elena Marin, Saana Mehtälä, Fernanda Paula Pinheiro, David Rodríguez-Gómez, Cecilia Inés Suárez, Mihaela Stîngu and Sue Timmis.
The rapid social, economic and technological changes taking place in the world today have led to the rise of social and emotional learning (SEL) as an essential requirement in positive human development and meaningful education. SEL competencies such as self-awareness, emotional regulation, problem solving, collaboration, understanding and empathising with others, embracing diversity and conflict resolution, are key 21st century competences.

The turbulences taking place in the Mediterranean region such as civil strife, violence, socio-economic hardship, forced displacement, human trafficking and child abuse, have directed academics’, policy makers' and practitioners’ interest towards SEL. SEL became an innovative avenue in preventing and addressing some of the main challenges being faced by countries in the Mediterranean basin in the healthy development and quality education of children and young people.

Social and Emotional Learning in the Mediterranean: Cross Cultural Perspectives and Approaches is the first publication of this kind to explore how the Mediterranean region is seeking to address the issues and challenges in the promotion and implementation of SEL. It is an attempt to raise awareness on the SEL policies, frameworks and practices taking place in the Mediterranean region, to share and celebrate good practices, and to critically reflect on the challenges faced in the effective implementation of SEL in the region, with recommendations for policy, interventions and research.
A Biographical Account of Racial, Class, and Gender Inequities in the Americas
Using auto-ethnography as a methodological framework, this book captures two diametrical poles of the author’s experiences growing up poor and being educated in a colonial school system in a developing country and currently working as a university professor in the United States. The author begins by recollecting his mixed childhood and adolescence experiences, including being subjected to abject poverty, escaping a sexual predator as a teenager, witnessing class, gender, and sexual inequities, while at the same time being supported by family, neighbours, and friends in his community. Next, the author talks about the social class privileges that he has enjoyed as a result of becoming a university professor while juxtaposing such privileges to micro-aggression, systemic racism, xenophobia, linguicism, and elitism that he has been facing in society, including in the Ivy Halls of White America.
In Educating for Social Justice: Field Notes from Rural Communities, educators from across the United States offer their experiences engaging in rural, place-based social justice education. With education settings ranging from university campuses in Georgia to small villages in New Mexico, each chapter details the stories of teaching and learning within the often-overlooked rural areas of the United States.

Attempting to highlight the experiences of rural educators, this text explores the triumphs, challenges, and hopes of teachers who strive to implement justice pedagogy in their rural settings.

Contributors are: Carey E. Andrzejewski, Hannah Carson Baggett, Sarah N. Baquet, T. Jameson Brewer, Brianna Brown, Christian D. Chan, Elizabeth Churape-García, Jason Collins, María Isabel Cortés-Zamora, Jacqueline Daniel, Joanna Davis-McElligatt, Katy Farber, Derek R. Ford, Sheri C. Hardee, Jehan Hill, Lynn Liao Hodge, Renee C. Howells, Adam W. Jordan, Rosann Kent, Shea N. Kerkhoff, Jeffery B. Knapp, Peggy Larrick, Leni Marshall, Kelly L. McFaden, Morgan Moore, Kaitlinn Morin, Nora Nuñez-Gonzalez, Daniel Paulson, Emma Redden, Angela Redondo, Gregory Samuels, Hiller Spires, Ashley Walther, Serena M. Wilcox, Madison Wolter, and Sharon Wright.
Advance Student-Scientist Partnerships beyond the Status Quo
Author: Pei-Ling Hsu
Working with scientists has been suggested as a powerful activity that can stimulate students’ interest and career aspirations in science. However, how to address challenges of power-over issues and communication barriers in youth-scientist partnerships? In Youths’ Cogenerative Dialogues with Scientists, the author describes a pioneering study to improve internship communications between youth and scientists through cogenerative dialogues. The findings show that cogenerative dialogues can help youth and scientists recognize, express, and manage their challenges and emotions as they arise in their internships. As a result, cogenerative dialogues help youth and scientists work productively as a team and enhance their social boding. Suggestions are also provided for science educators to design more innovative and effective projects for future youth-scientist partnerships.