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This essay presents Gould’s distinctive system for analyzing kin terminologies showing the system’s power, importance, and usefulness—and showing its relationship to other approaches and the payoffs each aims at. In revealing significant new empirical regularities and simplifications, Gould’s analytic system implies important constraints on future analytic and interpretative approaches to kin terminologies. Some of these new insights involve the demonstration of the effect of distributed collective cognitive systems over and above the effects of repeated iterations of individual cognitive constraints or pressures. It is the peculiar nature of the kinterm domain that allows these findings to be so directly shown, but the implication is that these findings apply more generally to the collective cognitive systems that make up language and culture.
Evil women, who are they really? What are their motives, and how are they remembered and constructed within our culture? Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film seeks to interrogate the nature and construction of evil women in the above fields. Through literature, poetry, history, ballads, film and real-life culture, scholars explore how the evil woman has been constructed and, in some cases, erased; the punishment and treatment of evil women; and the way evil women have been portrayed on and off screen through character, narrative and behind the camera development.
From Hip Hop Philosophy to Politics and Performance Art
Volume Editor: Jerold J. Abrams
This edited collection provides an in-depth and wide-ranging exploration of pragmatist philosopher Richard Shusterman’s distinctive project of “somaesthetics,” devoted not only to better understanding bodily experience but also to greater mastery of somatic perception, performance, and presentation. Against contemporary trends that focus narrowly on conceptual and computational thinking, Shusterman returns philosophy to what is most fundamental—the sentient, expressive, human body with its creations of living beauty. Twelve scholars here provide penetrating critical analyses of Shusterman on ontology, perception, language, literature, culture, politics, aesthetics, cuisine, music, and the visual arts, including films of his work in performance art.
Volume Editors: Tamara Nair and Maria Inês Amaro
Citizenship is one of the most important legacies of human development. It raises the human status from a biological condition into a cultural, moral, political and rationalistic one. It is a constantly evolving process, which at each new turn, adds complexity to human existence.
After the breakthroughs of the eighteenth century, with the first steps in recognition of civil and political rights, and of the twentieth century with the advancement of social rights and the emergence of cultural and environmental rights, one could conclude that the twenty-first century would see an enlargement of citizenship ideas and ideals. Has this indeed happened? Where are we now when it comes to identifying ourselves as citizens?
Varying across several disciplines, this volume addresses the complexities of citizenship and our attempts to make sense of them.