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Author: Sam Mickey
New Materialism and Theology reflects on questions of human embodiment, nonhuman agency, technological innovation, and what really matters now and in possible futures. Bringing theological inquiry together with the philosophical movement of new materialism, Sam Mickey points toward a variety of ways for thinking about matter and everything that materializes in human and more-than-human worlds. Mickey provides introductory definitions and historical context for understanding the relationship between various theological and materialist ideas and practices. He examines the self-declared novelty and materiality of new materialism, noting the limitations of those labels while articulating the very new and quite material challenges that new materialism does indeed pose, challenges of urgent existential importance that demand theological responses. New Materialism and Theology faces the theological implications and material possibilities facing humanity while ecological and technological realities seem to be pointing toward posthuman or transhuman futures or perhaps something else entirely.
Educational equity, inclusion, belonging, and justice are widely considered to be the most important civil rights challenge of the 21st century. Many HBCUs began in the 1800s as institutions to prepare Black teachers to teach in segregated America. Although their focus has expanded since their critical beginnings, HBCUs remain significant producers of African American teachers. Today, as the United States grapples with educational disparities, lack of diversity among education professionals, systemic racism, and the recent politically-inspired assaults on Critical Race Theory, we need HBCU leadership in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade education more than ever. Black College Leadership in PK–12 Education amplifies the research and perspectives of HBCU leaders, including four HBCU education deans, on how HBCUs help school districts optimize education for Black preschool, elementary and secondary students. Specific topics include HBCU teacher preparation, building HBCU and PK–12 partnerships, culturally responsive teaching, inclusive assessment practices, and HBCU leadership in STEM education. This book is ideal for school teachers and administrators who want to use HBCUs as a resource to improve education, as well as HBCU leaders who want to work more effectively with local school districts.
At the dawn of the new millennium, immigration means a new beginning for many Cabo Verdean youth who arrive in Boston, Massachusetts. This new generation of Cabo Verdeans, however, faces different sets of challenges—ranging from family separation and reunification, to emerging street violence, to “sweeps” that culminate in deportation. This book chronicles the journey of Cabo Verdean young men as they negotiate their feelings around family, school, and neighborhood contexts. Ambrizeth Helena Lima discusses in depth the factors within these contexts that compel some of the young men to thrive and succeed, and others to spiral into a cycle of violence and eventual deportation. Lima also shows the young men’s vulnerability in their urban neighborhoods, as one of them declares that in this journey “you’re on your own.” The young men in her book discuss their dreams, love for their family and culture, and the struggle to become “American.” As with other racialized immigrant youth from places as diverse as the Caribbean and South Asia, these young men face racial, ethnic, and gender stereotypes that are grounded in America’s white/black racial rationalization process. Their journey is marked with emotional and psychological upheaval as they strive to find a path that leads to the better life that America promised them.