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Editor: Pierino Gallo
Le statut polygraphique et la structure hétérogène de l’ Histoire des deux Indes invitent à réexaminer les méthodes et les stratégies employées par les rédacteurs, et amènent à lire le texte dans une double perspective : celle dictée par la tradition historiographique et celle suggérée, en parallèle, par les intrusions du discours philosophique. C’est ce dernier aspect que tâchent d’interroger les études ici réunies, en mettant l’accent sur le recyclage des sources et le croisement des voix textuelles (ce qui finit par « mettre en scène » une pluralité de visions sur les thématiques traitées), sur les phénomènes rhétoriques utilisés par les auteurs (apostrophes, commentaires, dialogues fictifs et apartés), et/ou sur les figures qui marquent la narration d’une polyphonie subjective.

The polygraphic status and the heterogeneous structure of the Histoire des deux Indes invite us to re-examine the methods and strategies employed by the editors, and lead us to read the text from a double perspective: that dictated by the historiographical tradition and that suggested, in parallel, by the intrusions of philosophical discourse. It is this latter aspect that the articles gathered here attempt to examine, focusing on the recycling of sources and the crossing of textual voices (which ends up "staging" a plurality of visions on the themes treated), on the rhetorical phenomena used by the authors (apostrophes, commentaries, fictitious dialogues and asides), and/or on the figures that mark the narrative with a subjective polyphony.
From the late sixteenth century until their expulsion in 1767, members of the Society of Jesus played an important role in the urban life of Spanish America and as administrators of frontier missions. This study examines the organization of the Society of Jesus in Spanish America in large provinces, as well as the different urban institutions such as colegios and frontier missions. It outlines the spiritual and educational activities in cities. The Jesuits supported the royal initiative to evangelize indigenous populations on the frontiers, but the outcomes that did not always conform to expectations. One reason for this was the effect of diseases such as smallpox on the indigenous populations. Finally, it examines the 1767 expulsion of the Jesuits from Spanish territories. Some died before leaving the Americas or at sea. The majority reached Spain and were later shipped to exile in the Papal States.
A Biographical Account of Racial, Class, and Gender Inequities in the Americas
Using auto-ethnography as a methodological framework, this book captures two diametrical poles of the author’s experiences growing up poor and being educated in a colonial school system in a developing country and currently working as a university professor in the United States. The author begins by recollecting his mixed childhood and adolescence experiences, including being subjected to abject poverty, escaping a sexual predator as a teenager, witnessing class, gender, and sexual inequities, while at the same time being supported by family, neighbours, and friends in his community. Next, the author talks about the social class privileges that he has enjoyed as a result of becoming a university professor while juxtaposing such privileges to micro-aggression, systemic racism, xenophobia, linguicism, and elitism that he has been facing in society, including in the Ivy Halls of White America.
The Post-Racial Hoax in South Africa and the United States
Author: Arnold Dodge
Sanitized Apartheid: The Post-Racial Hoax in South Africa and the United States examines the similar histories of South Africa and the US. After the invasion of foreigners, entire races of people were slaughtered, enslaved, and delegitimized. Heroic figures emerged along the way, only to have their efforts nullified by powerful white people. The historical parallels continued as freedom fighters won victories for the oppressed, in some cases codifying equality under the law. However, a powerful de facto current in the social/cultural environments remains in both countries. The book squarely addresses the vile strain which calls for a halt to protest and an acceptance of what is. The author examines these issues through an exhaustive research agenda and a personal narrative.
In Educating for Social Justice: Field Notes from Rural Communities, educators from across the United States offer their experiences engaging in rural, place-based social justice education. With education settings ranging from university campuses in Georgia to small villages in New Mexico, each chapter details the stories of teaching and learning within the often-overlooked rural areas of the United States.

Attempting to highlight the experiences of rural educators, this text explores the triumphs, challenges, and hopes of teachers who strive to implement justice pedagogy in their rural settings.

Contributors are: Carey E. Andrzejewski, Hannah Carson Baggett, Sarah N. Baquet, T. Jameson Brewer, Brianna Brown, Christian D. Chan, Elizabeth Churape-García, Jason Collins, María Isabel Cortés-Zamora, Jacqueline Daniel, Joanna Davis-McElligatt, Katy Farber, Derek R. Ford, Sheri C. Hardee, Jehan Hill, Lynn Liao Hodge, Renee C. Howells, Adam W. Jordan, Rosann Kent, Shea N. Kerkhoff, Jeffery B. Knapp, Peggy Larrick, Leni Marshall, Kelly L. McFaden, Morgan Moore, Kaitlinn Morin, Nora Nuñez-Gonzalez, Daniel Paulson, Emma Redden, Angela Redondo, Gregory Samuels, Hiller Spires, Ashley Walther, Serena M. Wilcox, Madison Wolter, and Sharon Wright.
A Global Studies Perspective on Brazil-Mozambique Development Discourse
New Books Network: Modernization Dreams, Lusotropical Promises

What history and motivations make up the discourses we are taught to hold, and spread, as common sense? As a member of Brazil's upper middle class, Ana Beatriz Ribeiro grew up with the image that to be developed was to be as European as possible. However, as a researcher in Europe during her country's Workers' Party era, she kept reading that Africans should be repaid for developing Brazilian society – via Brazil's "bestowal" of development upon Africa as an "emerging power." In Modernization Dreams, Lusotropical Promises, the researcher investigates where these two worldviews might intersect, diverge and date back to, gauging relations between representatives and projects of the Brazilian and Mozambican states, said to be joined in cooperation more than others.
From Eusebio Kino to Daniel Berrigan, and from colonial New England to contemporary Seattle, Jesuits have built and disrupted institutions in ways that have fundamentally shaped the Catholic Church and American society. As Catherine O’Donnell demonstrates, Jesuits in French, Spanish, and British colonies were both evangelists and agents of empire. John Carroll envisioned an American church integrated with Protestant neighbors during the early years of the republic; nineteenth-century Jesuits, many of them immigrants, rejected Carroll’s ethos and created a distinct Catholic infrastructure of schools, colleges, and allegiances. The twentieth century involved Jesuits first in American war efforts and papal critiques of modernity, and then (in accord with the leadership of John Courtney Murray and Pedro Arrupe) in a rethinking of their relationship to modernity, to other faiths, and to earthly injustice. O’Donnell’s narrative concludes with a brief discussion of Jesuits’ declining numbers, as well as their response to their slaveholding past and involvement in clerical sexual abuse.
Author: Ryan R. Gladwin
Although church historians often call the 19th century the Great Century of Protestant mission, for Latin America it was the 20th century that was the great century of Protestant growth and expansion. The 20th century witnessed vast societal changes and the realization of systemic poverty and injustice as well as the exponential growth, pentecostalization, and diversification of Latin American Protestantism. Latin American Protestant Theology emerged during this century of change.
This text provides an introduction to Latin American Protestant Theology by engaging its dominant theological streams (Liberal, Evangelical, and Pentecostal) and how they understand themselves through the lens of mission. The text offers both a critique of the Christendom cartography that is dominant in Latin American Protestant Theology as well as suggestions for how to move towards a transformative theology of mission. The primary intention of this text is to offer an informed outline and analysis of the theological landscape of Latin American Protestantism. The secondary intention of this book is to note the contributions as well as deficiencies of the streams of LAPT in the hope to signal a possible path towards the development of an integral, transformative, contextual, and decolonial theological voice.
Thomasina Borkman reviews English-language social science research on North American self-help/mutual aid groups (SHGs) and organizations and some from industrialized countries. SHGs, known by many names, are voluntary, member-run groups of peers who share a common issue, utilize lived experience, and practice mutual aid. Borkman’s autoethnographic approach highlights her international SHG participation. Despite initial common values and practices in the 1960s and on, Alcoholics Anonymous, the mental health SHGs, and other SHGs evolved in the US as three separate social movements that became institutionalized by 2000; their history, characteristics, achievements and supportive infrastructure are summarized. British contributors Munn-Giddings and Boyce show in European countries how socio-political contexts shape self-help/mutual aid. Research has shifted from SHGs to peer support since 2000.