Chinese and African Entrepreneurs

Social Impacts of Interpersonal Encounters

Edited by Karsten Giese and Laurence Marfaing

This book offers in-depth accounts of encounters between Chinese and African social and economic actors that have been increasing rapidly since the early 2000s. With a clear focus on social changes, be it quotidian behaviour or specific practices, the authors employ multi-disciplinary approaches in analysing the various impacts that the intensifying interaction between Chinese and Africans in their roles as ethnic and cultural others, entrepreneurial migrants, traders, employers, employees etc. have on local developments and transformations within the host societies, be they on the African continent or in China. The dynamics of social change addressed in case studies cover processes of social mobility through migration, adaptation of business practices, changing social norms, consumption patterns, labour relations and mutual perceptions, cultural brokerage, exclusion and inclusion, gendered experiences, and powerful imaginations of China.

Contributors are Karsten Giese, Guive Khan Mohammad, Katy Lam, Ben Lampert, Kelly Si Miao Liang, Laurence Marfaing, Gordon Mathews, Giles Mohan, Amy Niang, Yoon Jung Park, Alena Thiel, Naima Topkiran.

Spatial Practices

Territory, Border and Infrastructure in Africa

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Edited by Ulf Engel, Marc Boeckler and Detlef Müller-Mahn

The edited collection Spatial Practices: Territory, Border and Infrastructure in Africa presents research findings from the German Research Council’s Priority Programme 1448 “Adaptation and Change in Africa” (2011-2018). At the heart of the volume are important new spatial practices that have emerged after the end of the Cold War in the fields of conflict, climate change, migration and urban development, to name but a few, and their ordering effects with regard to social relations. These findings bear particular relevance for the co-production of territorialities and sovereignties, for borders and migrations, as well as infrastructures and orders.

Contributors are: Sabine Baumgart, Andrea Behrends, Marc Boeckler, Martin Doevenspeck, Ulf Engel, Claudia Gebauer, Karsten Giese, Katharina Heitz Tokpa, Shahadat Hossain, Anna Hüncke, Gabriel Klaeger, Kelly Si Miao Liang, Andreas Mehler, Felix Müller, Detlef Müller-Mahn, Wolfgang Scholz, Sophie Schramm, Jannik Schritt, Michael Stasik, Florian Weisser, Julia Willers, and Franzisca Zanker.

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Tony Saich

This review essay provides an analytical review of the most important works on the evolving nature of the state-society relationship in China post-1949. It is not intended to provide a new theoretical framework for understanding state-society relations; rather, the goal is to draw together the most important analyses in Western and Chinese writings. We begin by looking at the changing role of two key institutions that have been used by the state to manage society: the household registration system and the workplace. The analysis of the Maoist period looks at theories derived from Soviet studies as well as those that draw on the Chinese Communist Party’s own experiences pre-1949. We complete the review by looking at competing theories such as civil society, corporatism, or authoritarian resilience that seek to define the relationship and then look in depth at how to categorize the variety of state-society relations at the local level.

Race and Racism in Modern East Asia

Western and Eastern Constructions

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Edited by Rotem Kowner and Walter Demel

Race and Racism in Modern East Asia juxtaposes Western racial constructions of East Asians with constructions of race and their outcomes in modern East Asia. It is the first endeavor to explicitly and coherently link constructions of race and racism in both regions. These constructions have not only played a decisive role in shaping the relations between the West and East Asia since the mid nineteenth century, but also exert substantial influence on current relations and mutual images in both the East-West nexus and East Asia. Written by some of the field's leading authorities, this groundbreaking 21-chapter volume offers an analysis of these constructions, their evolution and their interrelations.

Chinese Activism of a Different Kind

The Chinese Students' Campaign to Stay in Australia

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Gao Jia

In Chinese Activism of a Different Kind, Jia Gao examines the social behavior and patterns of actions of 45,000 or so Chinese students as they fought to obtain the right to stay permanently in Australia after the June 4 'Tiananmen Square' incident of 1989.
In a time of relative Internet infancy their response to the shifting stances of the Australian government saw them build networks, make use of media and develop a range of strategies. In achieving success this diverse group of students became the largest intake of onshore asylum seekers in the history of Australian immigration. Through their testimonies Jia Gao provides a fascinating addition to our knowledge of Chinese activism and to the history of Chinese migration.

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Edited by Kwok-bun Chan, Agnes Ku and Yin-wah Chu

The annual is a venue of publication for sociological studies of Chinese societies and the Chinese all over the world. The main focus is on social transformations in Hong Kong, Taiwan, the mainland, Singapore and Chinese overseas.

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Keping Yu

China has witnessed great economic, political and societal changes since the reform and opening up in 1978. As China's economic system has been experiencing fundamental changes, China’s structure of governance has also been substantially altered in response to globalization. A unique model of political development is underway in China, which differs considerably from those conceived under both traditional socialist and liberal Western models. Globalization and Changes in China’s Governance, now available in English translation, tackles these issues of global importance through the analytical prowess of one of China’s leading intellectuals. This volume is an essential resource for readers tracking the rapid changes in China’s political and economic systems and for those interested in the work of public intellectuals in the PRC.

This book is also available in hardcover.

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Edited by Tze-ki Hon and Robert Culp

This book examines forms of Chinese historical production happening outside the mainstream of academic history, through such new measures as the publication of textbooks, the writing of local history, the preservation of archival materials, and government attempts to establish orthodox historical accounts. The book does so in order to broaden the scope of modern Chinese historiography, when it focuses primarily on a small group of writers such as Liang Qichao, Gu Jiegang, and Fu Sinian.
Directly linking historical writings to the formation of the nation, the justification of elite authority, and the cultivation of active citizenry, this book shows that historiography is essential to understanding the uniqueness of Chinese modernity.

Also available in paperback.

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Edited by Yanjie Bian, Kwok-bun Chan and Tak-sing Cheung

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies is the offi cial annual of The Hong Kong Sociological Association. It publishes articles of original research that addresses theoretical, methodological, or substantive issues of sociological significance about social transformations in Chinese societies. The focus is mainly on Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan, the Mainland, Singapore, and Chinese overseas.

Love, Hatred, and Other Passions

Questions and Themes on Emotions in Chinese Civilization

Edited by Paolo Santangelo and Donatella Guida

This volume aims at starting a debate on functions, role and relevance of states of mind in Chinese History and civilization. It focuses on an anthropological aspect of human experience, the affective world, as it is represented and evaluated in the various sources. A number of well-known specialists, ranging from the philosophical basic concepts to some fundamental questions about terminology, analyze literary, historical and judicial materials: this collection of essays presents different opinions, experiences and perspectives on the understanding of emotional and mental states in Chinese civilization, as well as about the difficulties met on the topic. A fascinating and useful reading for all those who are interested in humanities and in the history of mentality.