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Edited by Anthony Grenville and Andrea Reiter

Political Exile and Exile Politics in Britain after 1933 brings together a number of scholarly essays that shed light on a hitherto neglected aspect of the experience of German and Austrian refugees in Britain – their political activities in their country of refuge and how these were viewed (and used) by the British government and its Secret Service.
This volume does not claim to be exhaustive. However, it offers a range of case studies on various issues concerning political exile and the possibility of the continuation of political engagement in exile, even in the internment camps. Most of the contributions in this volume are based on archival material that has never been used before possibly because, like the MI5 files on Karl Otten which have only recently been declassified, researchers have not been able to access them.
Predictably, the majority of these essays show the political activities of men. The efforts of women which constitute the focus of three contributions therefore are all the more noteworthy.

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Edited by Charmian Brinson and Marian Malet

This volume focuses on a previously under-researched area, namely exile in and from Czechoslovakia in the years prior to the Second World War as well as during the wartime and post-war periods. The study considers, firstly, the refugees from Germany and Austria who fled to Czechoslovakia during the 1930s; secondly, the refugees from Czechoslovakia, both German and Czech-speaking, who arrived in Britain in or around 1938 as refugees from Fascism; and thirdly, those who fled from Communism in 1948. From a variety of perspectives, the book examines the refugees’ activities and achievements in a range of fields, both on a collective and an individual basis. The volume will be of interest to scholars and students of twentieth century history, politics and cultural studies as well as those involved in Central European Studies and Exile Studies. It will also appeal to a general readership with an interest in Britain and Europe in the 1930s and 1940s.

Rifts in Time and in the Self

The Female Subject in Two Generations of East German Women Writers

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Cheryl Dueck

The fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 marked the end of East Germany’s socialist regime and a new beginning for a unified German Federal Republic. Cultural historians agree that the event caused one of the deepest rifts in time and thinking seen by an entire generation of Germans—a rift that left its mark on the psyche of every citizen, challenging notions of the personal and the political, and crashing traditional understandings of the individual and the collective self.
In this bold rethinking of the question, Cheryl Dueck goes beyond the social, political, and psychological discourses that Marx and Freud, Foucault and Lacan viewed as the initiators of modern (socialist) identities to explore the literature and discourse of the quest for unity of the female subject. Reading such authors as Christa Wolf, Brigitte Reimann, Helga Königsdorf, and Helga Schubert, Dueck traces the striking fissures which run through time and through the female self, haunting women within the socialist project.
The book shows how two generations of women writers have struggled consciously and systematically in their letters, aesthetic writings, and literary production to create a new language to express their own sense of self within a restrictive socialist and patriarchal system. Rifts in Time and in the Self offers an unprecedented look at the reconceptualizations of the female subject during several phases of GDR history, and women writers’ persistent attempt to carve out spaces of identity and community.

Writing against Boundaries

Nationality, Ethnicity and Gender in the German-speaking Context

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Edited by Barbara Kosta and Helga Kraft

Writing against Boundaries. Nationality, Ethnicity and Gender in the German-speaking Context presents a series of essays by prominent scholars who critically explore the intersection of nation and subjectivity, the production of national identities, and the tense negotiation of multiculturalism in German-speaking countries. By looking at a wide spectrum of texts that range from Richard Wagner's operas to Hans Bellmer's art, and to literature by Aras Ören, Irene Dische, Annette Kolb, Elizabeth Langgässer, Karin Reschke, Christa Wolf, to contemporary German theater by Bettina Fless, Elfriede Jelinek, Anna Langhoff, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, and to Monika Treut's films, the volume explores the intersection of gender, ethnicity and nation and examines concepts of national culture and the foreigner or so-called 'other.' Focusing on such issues as immigration, xenophobia, gender, and sexuality, the volume looks at narratives that sustain the myth of a homogeneous nation, and those that disrupt it. It responds to a growing concern with borders and identity in a time in which borders are tightening as the demands of globalization increase.

After the GDR

New Perspectives on the Old GDR and Young Länder

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Edited by Laurence McFalls and Lothar Probst

This volume represents the efforts of fifteen scholars from Europe and North America to work through the complex and sometimes compromising past and the current struggles that together define eastern German identity, society, and politics ten years after unification. Their papers offer an exemplary illustration of the variety of disciplinary methods and new source materials on which established and younger scholars can draw today to further differentiated understanding of the old GDR and the young Länder. In a volume that will interest students of German history, cultural studies and comparative politics, the authors show how utopian ideals quickly degenerated into a dictatorship that provoked the everyday resistance at all levels of society that ultimately brought the regime to its demise. They also suggest how the GDR might live on in memory to shape the emerging varieties of postcommunist politics in the young states of the Federal Republic and how the GDR experience might inspire new practices and concepts for German society as a whole. Most importantly, the papers here testify to the multidisciplinary vitality of a field whose original object of enquiry disappeared over a decade ago.

Essays on the Song Cycle and on Defining the Field

Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Word and Music Studies at Ann Arbor, MI, 1999

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Edited by Walter Bernhart and Werner Wolf

This volume assembles twelve interdisciplinary essays that were originally presented at the Second International Conference on Word and Music Studies at Ann Arbor, MI, in 1999, a conference organized by the International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA).
The contributions to this volume focus on two centres of interest. The first deals with general issues of literature and music relations from culturalist, historical, reception-aesthetic and cognitive points of view. It covers issues such as conceptual problems in devising transdisciplinary histories of both arts, cultural functions of opera as a means of reflecting postcolonial national identity, the problem of verbalizing musical experience in nineteenth-century aesthetics and of understanding reception processes triggered by musicalized fiction.
The second centre of interest deals with a specific genre of vocal music as an obvious area of word and music interaction, namely the song cycle. As a musico-literary genre, the song cycle not only permits explorations of relations between text and music in individual songs but also raises the question if, and to what extent words and/or music contribute to creating a larger unity beyond the limits of single songs. Elucidating both of these issues with stimulating diversity the essays in this section highlight classic nineteenth- and twentieth-century song cycles by Franz Schubert, Robert Schumann, Hugo Wolf, Richard Strauss and Benjamin Britten and also include the discussion of a modern successor of the song cycle, the concept album as part of today’s popular culture.

Heroes and Heroism in German Culture

Essays in Honor of Jost Hermand April 2000

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Edited by Stephen Brockmann and James Steakley

As Brecht’s Galileo observed, a country which needs heroes is unfortunate indeed – words which suggest that a society’s need for heroes is always a function of its shortcomings. By examining the role that heroes and heroism have played in German literature and culture over the past two centuries, the essays in this volume illuminate and contour both a flawed German society in need of heroes and the flawed but essential heroes brought forth by that society. Beginning in he era of the anti-Napoleontic Wars of Liberation, advancing to the challenging situation Germany faced at the end of World War II, and concluding with the current reemergence of a unified Germany after almost half a century of division, this volume broadens our understanding of the inadequacies and breakdowns of German society. In addition to analyses of heroism in German culture during the last two centuries, this volume contains the first major essays in English on cultural representations of disability in German culture and on AIDS in German literature, as well as two essays on the scholarly accomplishments of Jost Hermand, to whom all of the essays in the volume are dedicated.

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Reinhard Andress

Mallorca läßt zunächst einmal nicht an deutschsprachige Schriftsteller als Exilanten des Dritten Reiches denken. Doch verschlug es einige von ihnen auch dorthin, so Albert Vigoleis Thelen, Harry Graf Kessler, Franz Blei, Karl Otten, Marte Brill, Erich Arendt, Klaus Mann und Herbert Schlüter. Einmal auf der Insel angelangt, verbrachten sie ihre Exilzeit dort unter unterschiedlichen Umständen und verließen Mallorca spätestens 1936, als der Spanische Bürgerkrieg anfing und sie sich gewissermaßen wieder auf der falschen Seite befanden. Ihre Inselerlebnisse haben sie z.T. auch literarisch verarbeitet: Otten und Thelen in den Romanen Torquemadas Schatten und Die Insel des zweiten Gesichts, Blei in einem Romanfragment mit dem Titel Lydwina und Arendt in Gedichten. In den Emigrantenromanen Der Vulkan und Der Schmelztiegel von Mann und Brill hat sich die Insel ebenfalls niedergeschlagen. Die vorliegende Studie setzt sich das Ziel, dieses unbekannte Kapitel in der deutschen Exilforschung aufzuarbeiten. Dabei werden die näheren Umstände der Exilzeit auf Mallorca beleuchtet und die erwähnten Werke analysiert. Zu einem großen Teil stützt sich diese Studie auf unveröffentlichte Quellen

Literaturvermittlung um 1900

Fallstudien zu Wegen ins deutschsprachige kulturelle System

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Edited by Florian Krobb and Sabine Strümper-Krobb

Der Band Literaturvermittlung um 1900 enthält neun Fallstudien, in denen an ausgewählten Beispielen die Voraussetzungen, Prozesse und Ergebnisse der Literaturvermittlung in den deutschen Sprachraum hinein untersucht werden. Als Ausgangssprachen/-literaturen werden das Jiddische, das Skandinavische, das Niederländische, das Französische und das Englische erfaßt; inhaltlich geht es um die anglo-irische Literatur, die Literatur des Ostjudentums, die flämisch-niederländische Literatur, Kontakte und Begegnungen von Vertretern dieser literarischen Systeme, Aufnahmevoraussetzungen im deutschen Sprachraum, Mechanismen der Anverwandlung und Übersetzung, die Etablierungsversuche von fremdsprachlich originierenden literarischen Figuren (wie Pierrot und Dandy) sowie um die Begegnung von Literaturvermittlern in fremdkultureller Umgebung.