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The Global Trajectories of Queerness

Re-thinking Same-Sex Politics in the Global South

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Edited by Ashley Tellis and Sruti Bala



The Global Trajectories of Queerness interrogates the term “queer” by closely mapping what space the theorizing of same-sex sexualities and sexual politics in the non-West inhabits. From theoretical discussions around the epistemologies of such conceptualizations of space in the Global South, to specific ethnographies of same-sex culture, this collection hopes to forge a way of tracking the histories of race, class, caste, gender, and sexual orientation that form what is called the moment of globalization. The volume, co-edited by Ashley Tellis and Sruti Bala, asks whether the societies of the Global South simply borrow and graft an internationalist (read Euro-US) language of LGBT/queer rights and identity politics, whether it is imposed on them or whether there is a productive negotiation of that language.


Contributing Authors: Sruti Bala, Laia Ribera Cañénguez, Soledad Cutuli, Roderick Ferguson, Iman Ganji, Krystal Ghisyawan, Josephine Ho, Neville Hoad, Victoria Keller, Haneen Maikey, Shad Naved, Guillermo Núñez Noriega, Stella Nyanzi, Witchayanee Ocha, Julieta Paredes, Mikki Stelder, Ashley Tellis, and Wei Tingting

After Orientalism

Critical Perspectives on Western Agency and Eastern Re-appropriations

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Edited by François Pouillion and Jean-Claude Vatin

The debate on Orientalism began some fifty years ago in the wake of decolonization. While initially considered a turning point, Edward Said’s Orientalism (1978) was in fact part of a larger academic endeavor – the political critique of “colonial science” – that had already significantly impacted the humanities and social sciences. In a recent attempt to broaden the debate, the papers collected in this volume, offered at various seminars and an international symposium held in Paris in 2010-2011, critically examine whether Orientalism, as knowledge and as creative expression, was in fact fundamentally subservient to Western domination.
By raising new issues, the papers shift the focus from the center to the peripheries, thus analyzing the impact on local societies of a major intellectual and institutional movement that necessarily changed not only their world, but the ways in which they represented their world. World history, which assumes a plurality of perspectives, leads us to observe that the Saidian critique applies to powers other than Western European ones — three case studies are considered here: the Ottoman, Russian (and Soviet), and Chinese empires.
Other essays in this volume proceed to analyze how post-independence states have made use of the tremendous accumulation of knowledge and representations inherited from previous colonial regimes for the sake of national identity, as well as how scholars change and adapt what was once a hegemonic discourse for their own purposes. What emerges is a new landscape in which to situate research on non-Western cultures and societies, and a road-map leading readers beyond the restrictive dichotomy of a confrontation between West and East.

With contributions by: Elisabeth Allès; Léon Buskens; Stéphane A. Dudoignon; Baudouin Dupret; Edhem Eldem; Olivier Herrenschmidt; Nicholas S. Hopkins; Robert Irwin; Mouldi Lahmar; Sylvette Larzul; Jean-Gabriel Leturcq; Jessica Marglin; Claire Nicholas; Emmanuelle Perrin; Alain de Pommereau; François Pouillon; Zakaria Rhani; Emmanuel Szurek; Jean-Claude Vatin; Mercedes Volait

Der Opportunist

Eine Genealogie

Jonas Helbig

Opportunisten lösen Empörung und Bewunderung zugleich aus. Sie gelten als prinzipienlose, den eigenen Vorteil suchende Anpasser genauso wie als Meister im Ergreifen der günstigen Gelegenheit, der opportunity.
Dieser Doppeldeutigkeit spürt Jonas Helbig nach. In den Blick gerät so eine Geschichte, die im 19. Jahrhundert beginnt, bis heute anhält und sich in den Bereichen Strafrecht, Ökonomie und Politik abspielt. Zum einen handelt sie von der Erschütterung der dominanten Verhaltenslogiken jener Bereiche durch die massenhaft betriebenen, innerhalb einer Grauzone zwischen Anpassung und Abweichung verorteten Opportunismen von Gelegenheitsverbrechern, listigen Wirtschaftsakteuren und kompromissfreudigen Politikern. Zum anderen erzählt die Geschichte von der Bekämpfung dieser opportunistischen Masse. Unter Überschriften wie etwa Bewährungsstrafe, Governance oder politische Klugheit interessieren hier Regierungstechniken, die selbst eine Semantik des Opportunismus durchzieht.

Colonial Survey and Native Landscapes in Rural South Africa, 1850 - 1913

The Politics of Divided Space in the Cape and Transvaal

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Lindsay F. Braun

In Colonial Survey and Native Landscapes in Rural South Africa, 1850 - 1913, Lindsay Frederick Braun explores the technical processes and struggles surrounding the creation and maintenance of boundaries and spaces in South Africa in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The precision of surveyors and other colonial technicians lent these enterprises an illusion of irreproachable objectivity and authority, even though the reality was far messier.

Using a wide range of archival and printed materials from survey departments, repositories, and libraries, the author presents two distinct episodes of struggle over lands and livelihoods, one from the Eastern Cape and one from the former northern Transvaal. These cases expose the contingencies, contests, and negotiations that fundamentally shaped these changing South African landscapes.

Insurgency and Counterinsurgency in Kenya

A Social History of the Shifta Conflict, c. 1963-1968

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Hannah Whittaker

In Insurgency and Counterinsurgency in Kenya, Hannah Whittaker offers an in-depth analysis of the Somali secessionist war in northern Kenya, 1963-68. Combining archival and oral data, the work captures the complexity of the conflict, which combined a series of local, national and regional confrontations. The conflict was not, Whittaker argues, evidence of the potency of Somali nationalism, but rather an early expression of its failure. The book also deals with the Kenyan government’s response to the conflict as part of the entrenchment of African colonial boundaries at independence. Contrary to current narratives of an increasingly borderless world, Whittaker reminds us of the violence that is produced by state-led attempts to shore up contested borderlands. This work provides vital insights into the history behind the on-going troubled relationship between the Kenyan state and its Somali minority, and between Kenya and Somalia.

Voices of Zimbabwean Orphans

A New Vision for Project Management in Southern Africa

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Manasa Dzirikure and Garth Allen

The voices of orphans and other vulnerable children and young people and of their carers and professional development workers are documented and analysed to both criticise the inadequacies of current social development work and to create a new, alternative theory and practice of project management in Zimbabwe and southern Africa. This is the first extensive and intensive empirical study of Zimbabwean orphans and other vulnerable children and young people. Chronically poor children and their carers can be corrupted or silenced by management systems which fail to recognise their basic human needs. Resilience in the face of such adversity is celebrated by the dominant project management ideology and practice but is a major barrier to achieve genuine sustainable improvements in the lives of vulnerable children. We propose a new person-centred project management approach aimed at delivering comprehensive services for orphans, which explicitly recognises the needs of orphans and other poor children to be fully socially, politically and economically included within their communities and which avoids the reinforcement of power based inequalities and their unacceptable consequences. The moral bankruptcy of much social development work in Zimbabwe and elsewhere in Southern Africa is described and we delineate an alternative project management policy and practice.

Jean Paul Barbier-Mueller

Unlike the Toba Batak, their more populous and powerful neighbours in northern Sumatra, the western Karo Batak today claim they have no creation myth. Yet certain clues point to shared cosmogony among several Batak groups, now reinforced by Jean Paul Barbier-Mueller’s discovery of a very old traditional house among the western Karo. The symbolic decoration of the house eliminates all doubt: the western Karo once viewed the cosmos as divided into three worlds – Upper, Middle and Lower. The giant dragon who lived in the Lower World carried the Middle World (where humans reside) on its back, while the Upper World was the abode of a supreme deity accompanied by his sons, spirits and the souls of human ancestors who had been rich and powerful.

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Edited by Akinyinka Akinyoade, Wijnand Klaver, Sebastiaan Soeters and Dick Foeken

This volume attempts to dig deeper into what is currently happening in Africa’s agricultural and rural sector and to convince policymakers and others that it is important to look at the current African rural dynamics in ways that connect metropolitan demands for food with value chain improvements and agro-food cluster innovations. It is essential to go beyond a ‘development bureaucracy’ and a state-based approach to rural transformation, such as the one that often dominates policy debate in African government circles, organizations like the African Union and the UN, and donor agencies.

Race and Racism in Modern East Asia

Western and Eastern Constructions

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Edited by Rotem Kowner and Walter Demel

Race and Racism in Modern East Asia juxtaposes Western racial constructions of East Asians with constructions of race and their outcomes in modern East Asia. It is the first endeavor to explicitly and coherently link constructions of race and racism in both regions. These constructions have not only played a decisive role in shaping the relations between the West and East Asia since the mid nineteenth century, but also exert substantial influence on current relations and mutual images in both the East-West nexus and East Asia. Written by some of the field's leading authorities, this groundbreaking 21-chapter volume offers an analysis of these constructions, their evolution and their interrelations.

Africa in Scotland, Scotland in Africa

Historical Legacies and Contemporary Hybridities

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Edited by Afe Adogame and Andrew Lawrence

Africa in Scotland, Scotland in Africa provides scholarly, interdisciplinary analysis of the historical and contemporary relationships, links and networks between Scotland, Africa and the African diaspora. The book interrogates these links from a variety of perspectives – historical, political, economic, religious, diplomatic, and cultural – and assesses the mutual implications for past, present and future relationships. The socio-historical connection between Scotland and Africa is illuminated by the many who have shaped the history of African nationalism, education, health, and art in respective contexts of Africa, Britain, the Caribbean and the USA. The book contributes to the empirical, theoretical and methodological development of European African Studies, and thus fills a significant gap in information, interpretation and analysis of the specific historical and contemporary relationships between Scotland, Africa and the African diaspora.

Contributors are: Afe Adogame, Andrew Lawrence, Esther Breitenbach, John McCracken, Markku Hokkanen, Olutayo Charles Adesina, Marika Sherwood, Caroline Bressey, Janice McLean, Everlyn Nicodemus, Kristian Romare, Oluwakemi Adesina, Elijah Obinna, Damaris Seleina Parsitau, Kweku Michael Okyerefo, Musa Gaiya and Jordan Rengshwat, Vicky Khasandi-Telewa, Kenneth Ross, Magnus Echtler, and Geoff Palmer.