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The Global Trajectories of Queerness

Re-thinking Same-Sex Politics in the Global South

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Edited by Ashley Tellis and Sruti Bala



The Global Trajectories of Queerness interrogates the term “queer” by closely mapping what space the theorizing of same-sex sexualities and sexual politics in the non-West inhabits. From theoretical discussions around the epistemologies of such conceptualizations of space in the Global South, to specific ethnographies of same-sex culture, this collection hopes to forge a way of tracking the histories of race, class, caste, gender, and sexual orientation that form what is called the moment of globalization. The volume, co-edited by Ashley Tellis and Sruti Bala, asks whether the societies of the Global South simply borrow and graft an internationalist (read Euro-US) language of LGBT/queer rights and identity politics, whether it is imposed on them or whether there is a productive negotiation of that language.


Contributing Authors: Sruti Bala, Laia Ribera Cañénguez, Soledad Cutuli, Roderick Ferguson, Iman Ganji, Krystal Ghisyawan, Josephine Ho, Neville Hoad, Victoria Keller, Haneen Maikey, Shad Naved, Guillermo Núñez Noriega, Stella Nyanzi, Witchayanee Ocha, Julieta Paredes, Mikki Stelder, Ashley Tellis, and Wei Tingting

Scènes des genres au Maghreb

Masculinités, critique queer et espaces du féminin/masculin

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Edited by Claudia Gronemann and Wilfried Pasquier

Dans la lignée des études postcoloniales et des études sur le genre, Scènes des genres au Maghreb examine les manifestations du genre dans différentes formes d’expression artistique de l’espace franco-maghrébin. Ce volume réunit les réflexions et analyses captivantes de spécialistes en littérature, cinéma et linguistique dans le but d’éclairer la fonction structurante des mythes génériques et de souligner l’impact social des images et des codes genrés ainsi que leur incidence dans les différents champs artistiques. D’Isabelle Eberhardt à Yasmina Khadra en passant par Bernard-Marie Koltès, Assia Djebar, Abdelkébir Khatibi ou Rachid Boudjedra, la littérature du (ou en rapport avec le) Maghreb y occupe une place de choix, à côté d’œuvres cinématographiques de Julien Duvivier, Mehdi Ben Attia ou encore Merzak Allouache. L’ouvrage, qui aborde en outre la question de la musique (raï) et des traditions iconographiques et culturelles, interroge ainsi l’ensemble des modes de création, réécriture, subversion ou perpétuation des mythes.

Unreliable Truths

Transcultural Homeworlds in Indian Women’s Fiction of the Diaspora

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Sissy Helff

While many people see ‘home’ as the domestic sphere and place of belonging, it is hard to grasp its manifold implications, and even harder to provide a tidy definition of what it is. Over the past century, discussion of home and nation has been a highly complex matter, with broad political ramifications, including the realignment of nation-states and national boundaries. Against this backdrop, this book suggests that ‘home’ is constructed on the assumption that what it defines is constantly in flux and thus can never capture an objective perspective, an ultimate truth.
Along these lines, Unreliable Truths offers a comparative literary approach to the construction of home and concomitant notions of uncertainty and unreliable narration in South Asian diasporic women’s literature from the UK, Australia, South Africa, the Caribbean, North America, and Canada. Writers discussed in detail include Feroza Jussawalla, Suneeta Peres da Costa, Meera Syal, Farida Karodia, Shani Mootoo, Shobha Dé, and Oonya Kempadoo.
With its focus on transcultural homes, Unreliable Truths goes beyond discussions of diaspora from an established postcolonial point of view and contributes with its investigation of transcultural unreliable narration to the representation of a g/local South Asian diaspora.

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Ulrike Tancke

Early modern women writers are typically studied as voices from the margin, who engage in a counter-discourse to patriarchy and whose identities prefigure postmodern notions of fragmented selfhood. Studying a variety of literary forms – autobiographical writings, diaries, mothers’ advice books, poetry and drama – this innovative book approaches early modern women’s strategies of identity formation from an alternative angle: their self-writings should be understood as attempts to establish a coherent, stable and convincing subjectivity in spite of the constraints they encountered. While the authors acknowledge contradiction and ambiguity, they consistently strive to compromise and achieve balance. Drawing on social and cultural history, feminist theory, psychoanalysis and the study of discourses, the close reading of the women’s texts and other, literary and non-literary sources reveals that the female writers seek to reconcile the affective, corporeal, social, economic and ideological dimensions of their identities and thereby question both the modern idea of the unified self and its postmodern, fragmented variant. The women’s identities as writers, mothers, spouses, household members and economic agents testify to their acceptance of contradictions, their adherence to patriarchal norms and simultaneous self-assertion. Their pragmatic stances suggest that their simultaneous confidence and anxiety should be taken seriously, as tentative, precarious, yet ultimately workable and convincing expressions of identity.

The Female Crusoe

Hybridity, Trade and the Eighteenth-Century Individual

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C.M. Owen

What does the story of Robinson Crusoe have to do with understanding past and present women’s lives? The Female Crusoe: Hybridity, Trade and the Eighteenth-Century Individual investigates the possibility that Daniel Defoe’s famous work was informed by qualities attributed to trade, luxury and credit and described as feminine in the period. In this volume, Robinson Crusoe and the female castaway narratives published in its wake emerge as texts of social criticism that draw on neglected values of race and gender to challenge the dominant values of society. Such narratives worked to establish status and authority for marginalised characters and subjects who were as different, and as similar, as Defoe’s gentleman-tradesman and Wollstonecraft’s independent woman. The Female Crusoe goes on to address the twentieth-century engagement with the castaway tale, showing how three contemporary authors, in their complex and gendered negotiations of power and identity, echo, even while they challenge, the concerns of their eighteenth-century predecessors. This work will be of interest to students interested in literary engagements with individualism and women’s rights in the eighteenth and twentieth centuries.

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Cristina Johnston

Through the prisms of ethnicity, gender, and sexuality, French Minority Cinema explores key questions of identity and social interaction in the context of republican France, across two significant ‘minority’ cinemas: cinéma de banlieue and gay cinema. It offers the first comprehensive parallel study of these two bodies of film and their inter-relations, examining issues of national cinema and identity and the problematic status of minorities within the contemporary Republic. Against a backdrop of political and media debates on the PACS, parity, the affaire du voile and the French principle of laïcité, banlieue youth dissatisfaction, and gay parenting, French Minority Cinema charts the negotiatory discourse that has emerged through, and around, a core corpus of films released over the past two decades. This study will be of interest to scholars and students alike, working in the fields of French, Film, and Gay and Lesbian/Queer Studies.

L’Énigme-poésie

Entretiens avec 21 poètes françaises

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John C. Stout

L’Énigme-poésie présente une série d’entretiens avec vingt-et-une poètes françaises contemporaines. Une grande diversité de voix et d’approches face à l’objet poème se fait entendre dans ces discussions exceptionnelles. A travers un dialogue en profondeur, chaque poète cherche à définir et à explorer sa conception et sa pratique de la poésie. Les écrivaines reconnaissent toutes l’influence des ancêtres poétiques, surtout celle des poètes de la modernité française et européenne. Ces entretiens fournissent une excellente introduction à la poésie française contemporaine, ce volume s’adressant à la fois aux universitaires et à un plus large public qui essaie de s’orienter face à la production poétique actuelle. Les échanges servent aussi de guide permettant aux lecteurs et aux lectrices de découvrir des oeuvres et des pratiques individuelles richement impressionnantes qui méritent d’être infiniment mieux connues. La question du féminisme revient, certes, souvent dans ces entretiens mais la plupart des poètes interviewées expriment une certaine ambivalence à l’égard d’étiquettes parfois trop contraignantes.

Of Love and War

The Political Voice in the Early Plays of Aphra Behn

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Judy A. Hayden

Of Love and War: The Political Voice in the Early Plays of Aphra Behn is a study which situates Behn’s early plays within their historical and political context. Behn (c.1640-1689), the first professional female playwright in England, is a fascinating study, having traveled to Surinam as a young woman, served as a spy for Charles II, and evidently supported her family through her writing, including plays, poetry, fiction, and translation.
Her early plays have often been dismissed as romances, largely because they treat such social and/or gender issues as forced marriage and female desire. This study argues that these same social issues frequently serve as tropes for political commentary and propaganda in support of foreign and domestic policies. Behn’s plays clearly demonstrate staunch loyalist support of the Stuart government, yet within the dramatic construction, she—like her contemporary male colleagues, offers fascinating covert political criticism.

A Recipe for Discourse

Perspectives on Like Water for Chocolate

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Edited by Eric Skipper

Slender and yet panoramic in scope, historical and yet relevant to current-day concerns, Laura Esquivel’s Like Water for Chocolate has provoked from the outset a divergent range of critical opinions. The essays in A Recipe for Discourse: Perspectives on Like Water for Chocolate represent the novel’s problematic nature in their many diverse approaches, perspectives that are certain to awaken in the reader new ways of approaching the text while challenging old ones. This volume’s ‘dialogue’ format, in which essays are grouped thematically, is particularly effective in presenting such a diverse range of viewpoints. The reader will find herein lively discussion on LWFC as it relates to such themes as gastronomy, superstition, mythology, folklore, the Mexican Revolution, magical realism, female identity, alteration, and matriarchy/ patriarchy. It is the editor’s hope that a diverse readership, from undergraduate students to seasoned scholars, will find this volume engaging and enlightening.

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Edited by Cecilia Donohue

This addition to Rodopi Press’s Dialogue Series presents a collection of essays solely dedicated to Woman Hollering Creek (1991), Sandra Cisneros’s groundbreaking collection of short fiction stories and sketches. The emerging and veteran scholars who have contributed to this text approach Cisneros’s work from varied perspectives, including negotiation of geographic and sociocultural borders, popular and material culture, and gender portrayals. Author dialogues, in which the scholars comment upon each other’s research, constitute a unique, innovative feature of this particular volume. This book will be of interest to those engaged in Chicano/a literature and feminist/gender studies, as well as instructors of literary critical analysis.