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Racines et déracinements au grand écran

Trajectoires migratoires dans le cinéma français du XXIème siècle

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Edited by Marianne Bessy and Carole Salmon

Racines et déracinements au grand écran examine les représentations de la migration dans le cinéma français contemporain. L’héritage du passé colonial français, la décolonisation et les vagues d’immigration vers l’Hexagone continuent de jouer un rôle majeur dans la société française d’aujourd’hui. Les débats liés à l’« identité nationale » et à l’insécurité, la banalisation du programme du Front National, les reconduites à la frontière de Roms ou la crise des migrants en Méditerranée font que la question migratoire est une préoccupation pour la société et la scène politique française. L’ouvrage analyse comment des réalisateurs français tels que Yamina Benguigui, Laurent Cantet, Philippe Faucon, Philippe Lioret ou Marie-Claude Pernelle abordent les trajectoires migratoires (passées et présentes) propres à l’espace national français et les débats qu’elles suscitent.


Racines et déracinements au grand écran examines representations of migration in contemporary French cinema. The historical legacy of the French colonial past and of decolonization, with its subsequent waves of immigration to the Hexagone continues to impact French society. Debates over “national identity” and insecurity, the increasing success of the Front National platform, the recent Roma repatriations, and migrant crisis in the Mediterranean are only a few examples of the importance of the migration question in French society and politics today. The book analyzes how migratory trajectories (past and present) within the national French space, and the debates surrounding them, have been addressed by contemporary French directors - amongst others Yamina Benguigui, Laurent Cantet, Philippe Faucon, Philippe Lioret and Marie-Claude Pernelle - in their films.


When Storyworlds Collide

Metalepsis in Popular Fiction, Film and Comics

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Jeff Thoss

One can find it in the classics of experimental literature such as Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy or the short stories of Jorge Luis Borges, but also in the horror and fantasy fiction of Stephen King, in Mel Brooks’s spoof films and Grant Morrison’s superhero comics. The talk is of metalepsis, the transgression of narrative levels. While this device was long perceived as a narratological oddity reserved for avant-garde texts, it has recently emerged as a phenomenon of much wider bearing that exists in numerous media and in popular as well as high culture. When Storyworlds Collide wishes to do justice to this situation and offers both a refined model for the analysis of metalepsis across media and a detailed investigation of the uses and functions of metalepsis in popular culture, thus providing a valuable addition to the burgeoning field of post-classical and transmedial narrative theory.
Starting from a thorough reevaluation of the concept of metalepsis as it is discussed both in classical narratology and more recent endeavours, this book puts forth a deceptively simple yet flexible definition and typology of this device, centred on the violation of the border separating the inside and outside of a storyworld and designed to be transmedially applicable. In a second step, this model is put to the test through an analysis of a wide range of metaleptic narratives drawn from popular fiction, film, and comics. When Storyworlds Collide takes popular culture seriously, employing it neither to merely exemplify theory nor to demonstrate that it is ultimately a knockoff of high culture. Rather, it shows that metalepsis possesses a unique dynamics in popular storytelling and has become an essential device for pop-cultural self-reflection – while still retaining an immense potential to create amusing and entertaining narratives.
This book will be relevant to students and scholars from a wide variety of fields: narrative theory, intermediality and media studies, popular culture as well as literary, film and comics studies.

The Global Trajectories of Queerness

Re-thinking Same-Sex Politics in the Global South

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Edited by Ashley Tellis and Sruti Bala



The Global Trajectories of Queerness interrogates the term “queer” by closely mapping what space the theorizing of same-sex sexualities and sexual politics in the non-West inhabits. From theoretical discussions around the epistemologies of such conceptualizations of space in the Global South, to specific ethnographies of same-sex culture, this collection hopes to forge a way of tracking the histories of race, class, caste, gender, and sexual orientation that form what is called the moment of globalization. The volume, co-edited by Ashley Tellis and Sruti Bala, asks whether the societies of the Global South simply borrow and graft an internationalist (read Euro-US) language of LGBT/queer rights and identity politics, whether it is imposed on them or whether there is a productive negotiation of that language.


Contributing Authors: Sruti Bala, Laia Ribera Cañénguez, Soledad Cutuli, Roderick Ferguson, Iman Ganji, Krystal Ghisyawan, Josephine Ho, Neville Hoad, Victoria Keller, Haneen Maikey, Shad Naved, Guillermo Núñez Noriega, Stella Nyanzi, Witchayanee Ocha, Julieta Paredes, Mikki Stelder, Ashley Tellis, and Wei Tingting

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Edited by Theo D'haen and Reindert Dhondt

Ever since its appearance, Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote has exerted a powerful influence on the artistic imagination all around the world. This cross-cultural volume offers important new readings of canonical reinterpretations of the Quixote: from Unamuno to Borges, from Ortega y Gasset to Calvino, from Mark Twain to Carlos Fuentes. But to the prestigious list of well-known authors who acknowledged Cervantes’ influence, it also adds new and surprising names, such as that of Subcomandante Marcos, who gives a Cervantine twist to his Mexican Zapatista revolution. Attention is paid to successful contemporary authors such as Paul Auster and Ricardo Piglia, as well as to the forgotten voice of the Belgian writer Joseph Grandgagnage. The volume breaks new ground by taking into consideration Belgian music and Dutch translations, as well as Cervantine procedures in Terry Gilliam’s Lost in La Mancha. In all, this book constitutes an indispensable guide for the further study of the Quixote’s Nachleben and offers exciting proposals for rereading Cervantes.

Memories and Representations of War

The Case of World War I and World War II

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Edited by Elena Lamberti and Vita Fortunati

The contributors to the present volume approach World War I and World War II as complex and intertwined crossroads leading to the definition of the new European (and world) reality, and deeply pervading the making of the twentieth century. These scholars belong to different yet complementary areas of research – history, literature, cinema, art history; they come from various national realities and discuss questions related to Italy, Britain, Germany, Poland, Spain, at times introducing a comparison between European and North American memories of the two World War experiences. These scholars are all guided by the same principle: to encourage the establishment of an interdisciplinary and trans-national dialogue in order to work out new approaches capable of integrating and acknowledging different or even opposing ways to perceive and interpret the same historical phenomenon. While assessing the way the memories of the two World Wars have been readjusted each time in relation to the evolving international historical setting and through various mediators of memory (cinema, literature, art and monuments), the various essays contribute to unveil a cultural panorama inhabited by contrasting memories and by divided memories not to emphasise divisions, but to acknowledge the ethical need for a truly shared act of reconciliation.

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Daniel Barnett

This book offers sweeping and cogent arguments as to why analytic philosophers should take experimental cinema seriously as a medium for illuminating mechanisms of meaning in language. Using the analogy of the movie projector, Barnett deconstructs all communication acts into functions of interval, repetition and context. He describes how Wittgenstein’s concepts of family resemblance and language games provide a dynamic perspective on the analysis of acts of reference. He then develops a hyper-simplified formula of movement as meaning to discuss, with true equivalence, the process of reference as it occurs in natural language, technical language, poetic language, painting, photography, music, and of course, cinema. Barnett then applies his analytic technique to an original perspective on cine-poetics based on Paul Valery’s concept of omnivalence, and to a projection of how this style of analysis, derived from analog cinema, can help us clarify our view of the digital mediasphere and its relation to consciousness.
Informed by the philosophy of Quine, Dennett, Merleau-Ponty as well as the later work of Wittgenstein, among others, he uses the film work of Stan Brakhage, Tony Conrad, A.K. Dewdney, Nathaniel Dorsky, Ken Jacobs, Owen Land, Saul Levine, Gregory Markopoulos Michael Snow, and the poetry of Basho, John Cage, John Cayley and Paul Valery to illustrate the power of his unique perspective on meaning.

Theories on the Move

Translation’s Role in the Travels of Literary Theories

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Şebnem Susam-Sarajeva

Within translation studies books on translating conceptually dense texts, such as philosophical or theoretical writings, are remarkably few. Although the translation of literature has been a favourite topic for many decades, the translation of theories on literature has been neglected. The phrase ‘theories of translation’ is everywhere, but ‘translation of theories’ is a rare sight.
On the other hand, the term ‘translation’ has become a commonplace in literary and cultural studies – yet usually as a rhetorical figure describing the fate of those who struggle between two worlds and two languages, such as migrants or women. Not much attention has been paid to the role of ‘translation proper’ in contemporary circulation of ideas.
The book addresses these gaps in translation studies and in literary studies for the first time by examining two specific cases where translation strategies and patterns crucially influenced the reception of imported schools of thought. By examining the importation of structuralism and semiotics into Turkish and of French feminism into English, it invites the readers to think about the impact of translation on the transmission of ideas across linguistic-cultural borders and power differentials. It is, therefore, of particular interest to the scholars working in translation studies, in literary and cultural theory, and in gender studies.

She Changes by Intrigue

Irony, Femininity and Feminism

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Lydia Rainford

Contemporary feminist theorists have implied a special affinity between women and irony because of their ‘double’ relation to the prevailing order of things: both speak from within this order while remaining ‘other’ to it in some way. Irony can be regarded as the obvious mode in which a feminist might speak, as it reflects her relation to the patriarchal structure while refusing to validate the truth of the current sexual hierarchy. She Changes by Intrigue undertakes the first sustained analysis of the parallels between irony, femininity and feminism. By retracing the association of these terms through canonical and contemporary continental philosophy, the book seeks to illuminate a notion of sexual agency that has until now remained shadowy, in spite of its prevalence.
Examining the recurrence of the ‘ironic feminine’ in texts by Kristeva, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Irigaray, Derrida and Kofman, it argues that a radical revaluation of the legacy of patriarchal thought in feminism is necessary before irony can be embraced as a feminist strategy. In this context, She Changes by Intrigue offers a new reading of what it means to write as a feminist ‘subject’.
This volume will be of interest to students and academics working in the fields of gender studies, continental philosophy and critical / cultural theory.

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Edited by Nathalie Roelens and Yves Jeanneret

This book will be of interest to all those who have engaged with hypertext either as creators or as users. They will discover that screen writing has a history going back to a number of avant-garde practices which already incorporated a screen imaginary into the creative work. Readers of this volume will be offered a privileged insight into a debate between detractors and advocates of the new modes of writing and reading and the new means of cultural transmission (CD-ROM, the Internet, digitisation); they will thus be able to weigh up for themselves the assets and illusions, the heuristic merits and politico-commercial issues at stake. May these reflections convert the globe-trotters of hyperspace into knowledgeable navigators!

Cet ouvrage intéressera quiconque est confronté à l’hypertexte, que ce soit en tant que concepteur ou en tant qu’usager. Il découvrira ici que l’écrit d’écran a une histoire qui remonte à certaines pratiques avant-gardistes qui avaient déjà intégré un imaginaire de l’écran dans leurs créations. Il entrera de plain-pied dans un débat entre détracteurs et partisans des nouvelles modalités d’écriture/lecture et des nouveaux supports de transmission culturelle (cd-rom, Internet, digitalisation), afin qu’il puisse lui-même faire la part entre les atouts et les leurres, entre les mérites heuristiques et les enjeux politico-mercantiles. Que ces réflexions puissent convertir les globe-trotters de l’hypersphère en navigateurs avertis!

Word and Music Studies

Essays in Honor of Steven Paul Scher and on Cultural Identity and the Musical Stage

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Edited by Suzanne M. Lodato, Suzanne Aspden and Walter Bernhart

The eighteen interdisciplinary essays in this volume were presented in 2001 in Sydney, Australia, at the Third International Conference on Word and Music Studies, which was sponsored by The International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA). The conference celebrated the sixty-fifth birthday of Steven Paul Scher, arguably the central figure in word and music studies during the last thirty-five years. The first section of this volume comprises ten articles that discuss, or are methodologically based upon, Scher’s many analyses of and critical commentaries on the field, particularly on interrelationships between words and music. The authors cover such topics as semiotics, intermediality, hermeneutics, the de-essentialization of the arts, and the works of a wide range of literary figures and composers that include Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Proust, T. S. Eliot, Goethe, Hölderlin, Mann, Britten, Schubert, Schumann, and Wagner. The second section consists of a second set of papers presented at the conference that are devoted to a different area of word and music studies: cultural identity and the musical stage. Eight scholars investigate – and often problematize – widespread assumptions regarding ‘national’ and ‘cultural’ music, language, plots, and production values in musical stage works. Topics include the National Socialists’ construction of German national identity; reception-based examinations of cultural identity and various “national” opera styles; and the means by which composers, librettists, and lyricists have attempted to establish national or cultural identity through their stage works.